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37

That would have depended on the ship and your destination. To get a sense of the savings (the travel times are from today), consider the presentation that's referenced on the Suez Canal wiki page. As a point of comparison, London to New York is a bit over 3,300 nautical miles (6,200km) when traveling by sea. So going through Suez when traveling from Hormuz ...


28

Abyssinia / Ethiopia (the borders of which expanded and contracted frequently over the centuries) maintained its independence until 1936 by a combination of diplomatic skill in playing would-be colonizers off against each other, and military strength. These factors were, in turn, facilitated by centuries of diplomatic contacts with (as commented on by Denis ...


19

Three steam ships of the Blue Funnel Line used both routes (round the Cape of Good Hope and via the Suez Canal) between Europe and Asia from 1866 to 1870. Upon switching from round the Cape to through the Suez Canal, these same ships saved between 10 and 12 days. Arthur Holt's Blue Funnel Line sister ships Agamemnon, Ajax and Achilles all sailed on their ...


10

Ascertaining details in legends might be a good thing. But it is a legend and curiously lacks detail, leaving open a huge space for projections and arbitrary symbols, to be filled by listeners. And perhaps to the detriment of flower sellers who have a more complicated time instead of always stocking for example coffee flowers, or others. It might be more ...


10

The reasons why African countries have, in most cases, maintained the borders they inherited from the colonial powers are summarized below. Note that, given how broad the question is, some factors may apply to some countries but not to others. 1. Both the Organization of African Unity (OAU) and most leaders of individual states have specifically rejected ...


6

The short answer is: where there was even a small Muslim population, there were usually schools for children at the elementary level, even in villages. Overall, we are thus talking about numbers which dwarf the number of Christian missions. Without a basic religious education, Muslims cannot perform the duties required of them. Some of these schools were ...


6

The answer is as simple as it may seem disturbing: gross and constant violence. The way the borders between African nations were drawn at the end of the colonial era (which often reflected borders between administrative districts during that era) were as you noticed largely artificial constructs with little or no relation to the ethnic and cultural makeup ...


6

I am not a historian, but here's what I've found from a cursory look at the literature. There's Pre-Aksumite, but that demonym isn't exclusive to D'MT. From "Punt and Aksum: Egypt and the Horn of Africa.": There are extensive remains of a Pre-Aksumite culture (that is, the kingdom of D'MT in particular) in the area surrounding Aksum, although little ...


5

This article on Precolonial trade in Africa by the Oxford Research Encyclopedia should give you a number of good starting points. It goes through just about everywhere one might expect trade to occur, complete with references to primary sources, including but not limited to: Coastal trade on the East and West coasts. River trade along the Nile, the Zambezi, ...


5

Just registered for the site, but I do know a bit about this! Following World War 2, Ethiopia wanted Eritrea, and the UN in 1950 came up with an agreement in which they would be a Federation together. By the end of the decade it was clear Ethiopian interest reigned supreme, and Eritrean separatists - predominately Muslim and known as the Eritrean Liberation ...


4

Though mostly recent works,several published books claim it was the bloom of the Mimosa Tree, also known as the Persian Silk Tree. (image from The Mimosa Tree Complete Guide) From the book Ethiopia By Steven Gish, Winnie Thay, Zawiah Abdul Latif (2007) Menelik's Queen Taytu marveled at the flowering mimosa trees in the area, and thus the town was ...


4

The horrific violence that accompanied the partition of India following independence in 1947 was still fresh in everyone's minds in the early and mid 1960's, when most African countries obtained independence. Nisid Hajari, in “Midnight’s Furies” (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), his fast-paced new narrative history of Partition and its aftermath, writes, ...


3

You should be aware that Ireland was a neutral country during the Second World War, and Ireland had no overseas colonies. As far as I can see, none of the 151 soldiers in "A" Company of the 35th Battalion of the Irish Army had any experience of active service. This was certainly not a "commando company" or other specialist unit. While most of the men ...


3

With the caveat that one arguably can't prove a negative, this doesn't seem to have gotten captured in historical records - or at least not those indexed by Google and Google Scholar. Seeing how there are more than a few beautiful flowers that are native to the area, perhaps no one will ever know.


2

Gérard Chouin (professor of history and director of medieval and renaissance studies) is adamant that the medieval-era bubonic plague epidemic, the Black Death, spread to Sub-Saharan Africa and killed scores of people there as it did in Europe and the Mediterranean basin in the 14th century. More details in this link:https://docsbay.net/the-second-plague-...


2

Karim Achab's Internal Structure of Verb Meaning: A Study of Verbs in Tamazight (Berber) spends a page on the debate over Tifinagh's origins. James Février was the author that advanced the Phoenician thesis, on the basis of the script's name and some similarity between symbols. Supporting the independent development hypothesis, distinct Western and Eastern ...


1

See the interesting diary published as 'Travels in the Interior of Africa' by late Eighteenth Century British explorer Mungo Park. He travelled through inland Sub-Saharan West Africa, learned local languages and traced much of the course of the River Niger. The rest of this answer is based on that. Park records that trade among the Africans of that region ...


1

Morocco has no claim to the Canary islands, they have never occupied the territory. They have no cultural or historical presence. The aboriginal population may have been distantly related to Berbers, but so were lots of other people in the Sahel, and that does not entitle Morocco to claim the Sahel any more than it entitles the other nations of the Sahel to ...


1

According to Bradshaw's Through Routes to the Capitals of the World and Overland Guide to India, Persia, and the Far East (from 1903, so a bit later than you're looking for), it would take about 16 days on a commercial steamship to get from Liverpool to Sekondi. The ports of call listed along the way for the "Express" steamer are Grand Canary, Sierra Leone, ...


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