96

The Hindenburg was originally built with 25 double-berthed cabins which accommodated up to 50 passengers. While the ship was laid up in Frankfurt during the winter of 1936-1937, 9 more cabins were added, accommodating an additional 20 passengers. The capacity was then 70 fare-paying passengers. The arrangement of cabins on the Hindenburg in 1936 is shown ...


94

They were called paper darts in the 19th century, as evidenced in this article, which contains many detailed references going back as far as 1864, and many illustrations In fact, it appears that they continued to be called "paper darts" until the mid-20th century, when the terminology switched largely because airplanes had come to more closely ...


92

Yes, I can tell you from personal experience that they certainly did whistle. When I was a boy I lived in Nottingham, and until May 1941 we were lucky in that, although we heard (and sometimes saw) German aircraft, they usually passed over on their way to less fortunate cities like Sheffield, Coventry or Birmingham. But on the night of Thursday 8 May 1941, ...


78

Short Answer (Paper) Dart and (Paper) Arrow These terms were used from at least the 1860s. However, not all of these designs were what we would today recognize and call 'paper planes'. Some clearly looked like the darts thrown at dart boards. Details There are 19th century references (with images resembling paper planes) to 'paper dart' and 'arrow' (UK &...


60

Yes, at least three entered production "Was there a fighter jet designed without cannons?" is a bit different from Why do fighter jets still have guns/cannons? which focuses on just the F-4. The obsession with missiles started a bit before the F-4. During WW2 and the Cold War bombers got faster, flew higher, and carried increasingly destructive ...


45

The Soviets were caught by surprise and suffered massive casualties as a result. See this Wikipedia article. Lots of aircraft were destroyed on the ground, not the air. The first attacks began at 03:00 on 22 June. The Soviets had been caught by surprise, their aircraft bunched together in neat rows which were vulnerable. The results were devastating ... ...


44

The B-52 was capable of carrying thermonuclear weapons. These were the second-generation of nuclear weapons with greatly increased destructive power over the original WW2 atomic bombs. By 1957, these weapons had yields measured in megatons compared to the tens of kilotons that the first atomic bombs produced. For example, the Mark 39 nuclear bomb had a ...


41

By Googling "Snowden"+"Ryanair Belarus" I've found four more relevant examples. One story from 2010 seems to be a direct equivalent to what happened in Belarus: Taalaibek Turumbekov, deputy chief of Kyrgyzstan Aba Joldoru, the national airline, told RFE/RL that a plane flying from Dubai was made to land in the southern Iranian city of ...


30

To begin with, when the air campaign ahead of Operation Husky (the campaign that culminated with the invasion of Sicily) began, the Allies already had a significant numerical superiority over the Axis air forces in the theatre: Operation HUSKY air planners had nearly 5,000 operational aircraft at their disposal compared to the 1,500–1,600 Axis aircraft ...


29

Never look at history with your own 'modern' perceptions! In those days there were only 2 ways to cross the Atlantic: by ship or by zeppelin. A ship took longer than a zeppelin. Everybody crossed by ship. The zeppelin was as new as space travel now is, so the rich and famous preferred it. If only to show off they could afford it. Boring? Today 4 days seems a ...


26

Yes I can tell you from personal experience also I was six years old we lived in Haverton Hill, County Durham, England, there was a lot of heavy industry in that area including Dorman & long steel works, the ICI Imperial chemical industries, Furness ship building company, and Smith's dry dock, for ship repairs plus many smaller companies. They were after ...


25

To my surprise, this may be somewhat accurate. In the critical Battle of Sedan on May 13, Guderian fielded 1st and 2nd Panzer divisions, reinforced by Grossdeutchland infantry regiment, one regiment of assault engineers, and divisional artillery from two panzer divisions. To compensate for the absence of his artillery reserve, still in transit to the front, ...


22

tl;dr US aircraft pioneers argued over the Wright brothers' patents while the rest of the world quietly ignored the patents and "borrowed" the idea - and went on to making planes. Remember that 110 years ago enforcing a foreign patent was not something a government would be willing to undertake. Wrights Wright Brothers' main achievement was controlled ...


20

There were trials and plans, but Mosquitos never actually operated from carriers. Eric "Winkle" Brown who was the chief naval test pilot at RAE Farnborough at the time, did deck-landing and takeoff trials aboard HMS Indefatigable on 25th March 1944. This was the first landing of a twin-engine aircraft aboard a Royal Navy carrier, and his memoirs (Wings On My ...


19

The earliest air drops of aid to Poland were made in February 1941 using Whitley bombers. To the best of my knowledge, none of these drops involved parachuting agents into Poland. By 1943, Halifax bombers attached to 138 Squadron were being used by the Special Operations Executive to drop agents and supplies into Poland. There is an excellent PhD ...


19

I'll note here that the Morales' plane story is much more complicated that it's made to be in the other answer. It was apparently a false flag operation to a good extent, misleading the Westerners as to whom was on-board; or at least Assange claimed he did that. Anyway, the Morales plane landed in Austria because its crew claimed it could not read its fuel ...


18

It all started with North American P-51 Mustang which had sufficient range to escort US bombers in daytime raids: General James Doolittle told the fighters in early 1944 to stop flying in formation with the bombers and instead attack the Luftwaffe wherever it could be found. The Mustang groups were sent in well before the bombers in a "fighter sweep"...


18

The island of Great Britain, chock full of military airports, was well within aircraft range of the landing beaches. So special ships to carry airplanes would have really been unnecessary. For all intents and purposes, England acted as a giant aircraft carrier.


17

It seems that it's a mock-up image produced as publicity for the passenger model of the 747 aircraft by Boeing/Pan-American Airways. It would have to have been from the late 1960s, since the 747 entered service with Pan Am in January 1970.


17

The Wikipedia article cited in another answer lists among reasons ...equipment, like that of the Red Army, was largely obsolescent and suffering from prolonged use. The Great Purges had also hit aircraft manufacturers, and the loss of personnel ended the Soviet lead in aircraft design and aeronautics (...) The aviation industry was disrupted, severely, and ...


17

In 2013, Bolivia president's jet heading from Moscow, Russia was rerouted and forced to land in Austria in search for Edward Snowden; Bolivian president’s plane forced to land in Austria in hunt for Snowden — The Washington Post Evo Morales grounding incident — Wikipedia


15

From reading the two wikipedia articles, they had different opinions on how the air force should be used in war theaters. Douhet offers (emphasis mine): Douhet believed in the morale effects of bombing. Air power could break a people's will by destroying a country's "vital centers". Armies became superfluous because aircraft could overfly them and ...


15

The G6M1 were simply G4Ms reconfigured for transport, so the two are practically identical. Nonetheless, the component circled below indicates that the first aircraft is the G4M1. That loop is featured on drawings of the G4M1: But not on the G6M1-L2 series. Click to enlarge the above thumbnails.


15

Organizational deficiencies, technical obsolescence, inexperience of pilots, surprise caused by Stalin's blunder First of all, claims that VSS lost 4000 planes in the first three days of war is somewhat dubious. This is mostly based on German sources, which is understandable since Soviets usually omitted exact data from this embarrassing period . Only ...


14

Looks a bit like a Vultee BT-13 Valiant


14

The "Sea Mosquito" was tested in March 1944 with carrier deck landing trials on HMS Indefatigable in the Irish Sea. The pilot (almost inevitably) was the legendary Eric 'Winkle' Brown. He discussed the trials in a 2015 video, where he noted several problems with using the Mosquito in carrier operation, not the least of which was that the carrier’s ...


13

Smoking was allowed on the hydrogen filled zeppelin, the Hindenburg, but only in a specially made pressurized smoking room. the smoking room was separated from the rest of the passenger section by a double-door airlock. The smoking room was closely monitored at all times by a member of the zeppelin’s staff, and only one electric lighter was provided; no ...


13

This happened many times during the period of World War 2, such as in the Battle of Coral Sea and Battle of Midway (Japan versus United States). During the Battle of Coral Sea the aircraft carrier of Japan, IJN Shoho was destroyed while its aircraft still in the air. They didn't have the technology to communicate to locate their main force. So they ditched ...


13

Aircraft losses in carrier battles could be staggering. At Midway the United States lost the Yorktown with a capacity of 90 planes, but they also lost 113 carrier planes. Some of the surviving aircraft from Yorktown landed on Enterprise, refueled and rearmed, and attacked the Japanese again in the afternoon. A slightly different principle applied during ...


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