94

They were called paper darts in the 19th century, as evidenced in this article, which contains many detailed references going back as far as 1864, and many illustrations In fact, it appears that they continued to be called "paper darts" until the mid-20th century, when the terminology switched largely because airplanes had come to more closely ...


78

Short Answer (Paper) Dart and (Paper) Arrow These terms were used from at least the 1860s. However, not all of these designs were what we would today recognize and call 'paper planes'. Some clearly looked like the darts thrown at dart boards. Details There are 19th century references (with images resembling paper planes) to 'paper dart' and 'arrow' (UK &...


60

Yes, at least three entered production "Was there a fighter jet designed without cannons?" is a bit different from Why do fighter jets still have guns/cannons? which focuses on just the F-4. The obsession with missiles started a bit before the F-4. During WW2 and the Cold War bombers got faster, flew higher, and carried increasingly destructive ...


41

By Googling "Snowden"+"Ryanair Belarus" I've found four more relevant examples. One story from 2010 seems to be a direct equivalent to what happened in Belarus: Taalaibek Turumbekov, deputy chief of Kyrgyzstan Aba Joldoru, the national airline, told RFE/RL that a plane flying from Dubai was made to land in the southern Iranian city of ...


19

I'll note here that the Morales' plane story is much more complicated that it's made to be in the other answer. It was apparently a false flag operation to a good extent, misleading the Westerners as to whom was on-board; or at least Assange claimed he did that. Anyway, the Morales plane landed in Austria because its crew claimed it could not read its fuel ...


17

In 2013, Bolivia president's jet heading from Moscow, Russia was rerouted and forced to land in Austria in search for Edward Snowden; Bolivian president’s plane forced to land in Austria in hunt for Snowden — The Washington Post Evo Morales grounding incident — Wikipedia


11

There was a lot of rapidly changing technology in the B-29's guns during the lifetime of the aircraft, and hence a lot of change in nomenclature for different crew roles. It seems that EMG was used at the end of the war for "Electrical Mechanical Gunner", as seen in crew rosters such as the ones given here in spelled out form, and here in ...


11

Interception of EgyptAir jet: Terrorists murdered a US citizen Egypt let the terrorists fly out on a commercial (chartered) airplane US intercepted the flight in international airspace and made it land in Italy Italians released the mastermind but tried the terrorists (calling them "soldiers fighting for their ideals")


10

They did, but the amounts of stuff they were able to deliver was not enough. Firstly: air superiority. Soviets didn't have that in the first part of the war. But they tried to supply nonetheless, at night for example. Secondly: sufficient number of suitable transport planes as well as transport containers to supply the troops. They lacked specialized ...


10

There's an article published by the BBC today on this very topic. It quotes three of the examples listed in the accepted answer, and this one from 1956: 1956: The arrest of the leaders of the Algerian independence movement On 22 October 1956 five leaders of the Algerian independence movement, the FLN, were on a civilian flight from Rabat in Morocco to Tunis,...


7

One of the most authoritative, go-to, books, in English, on the subject of Japanese Naval aviation is Mark Peattie’s Sunburst – The Rise of Japanese Naval Air Power 1909-1941. (See review by Robert Cressman, of the US Naval Historical Command, for the US Naval War College Review, here.) Peattie makes no mention of a doctrinal mandatory arrestor wire. ...


5

Modern planes without cannons are the F-35B, F-35C, and the FA-18G. The F-35A has an inbuilt gun. The two JSFs have an external pod with a cannon that they can carry by giving up something else. The FA-18G growler loses the cannon so it can carry more computers to process signals. The type of pods that could be carried on the JSF instead of a gun is a rear ...


5

Possibly yes but no concrete proof I found this list of units operating Me-262 during the war. What we have mentioned is Erprobungskommando 262, Kommando Nowotny, Kommando Schenk (Conversion unit for bomber pilots), KG 51 (Kampfgeschwader 51 Staff unit, as well as Gruppen I and II), Kommando Edelweis (Experimental unit usin KG 51 pilots), Jagdgeschwader 7, ...


4

One instance from 1954, Syrian plane captured by Israel: TEL AVIV, Israel, Dec. 12 -A Syrian Airways Dakota was intercepted by Israeli fighter planes this morning and escorted to Lydda Airport. Four passengers' and five crew members were detained, but one passenger, an American citizen, was released. Second instance from 2010, involving a flight from Paris ...


3

From what I've found, the Ju 88 was updated during the Battle of Britain: A series of field modifications were made to make the Ju 88 less vulnerable, including the replacement of the single MG 15 rear machine gun by a twin-barreled MG 81Z machine gun and the fitting of additional cockpit armour. Other than field modification, a newer version (A-4) was ...


3

This was a problem with an entire generation of jet fighters, mentioning a selection of the most used ones here: multiple US-designed fighters are described in the other two answers Sukhoi Su-9 Sukhoi Su-11 Sukhoi Su-15 Tupolev Tu-128 Yakovlev Yak-28P Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-25 Some of these had a later variant with builtin gun, some had the problem solved ...


2

These optional gadgets were like organ pipes and sounded like them, plus the acoustic effects the question explains. But the sound as such may also be produced just by the stabiliser fins alone. When the organ pipes are fitted, this is called a screaming bomb. If such a sound enhancer was used it might have looked like this: — History of War, SC50 a ...


2

"Paper darts" were the best way to have fun in the 1860s. As early as 1864, kids were flying "paper darts" that looked like what we call "paper airplanes" today.They were called paper darts because they looked and acted like "darts" to a degree of thinking.


2

To figure out when the tomato juice phenomenon started, it is probably useful to check when tomato juice had started to be offered at all. I've found this: II."THE ORIGIN OF TOMATO JUICE" In August 1933, at the initiative of our colleague Christian DOMBREVANNE, at the time Principal Director of the Aeronautics Division of the KLEBER-COLOMBES ...


2

The question could be divided in two parts: First, when did they loose the title of King of The Sea to Aircraft Carrier, then when did the naval strategy change? And of course, all of that should be considered in respect of each country's naval system. Germany The Germans aimed during WW1 to be challenger of the seas. They used battleships against UK's ...


1

It is difficult to pinpoint an exact date or even month when the Luftwaffe lost air superiority, because the Luftwaffe's defeat was a slow downhill spiral for about 18 months comprised of many smaller victories and defeats. There are 3 points along this timeline that could be considered the "loss" of Luftwaffe air superiority. First, The allied ...


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