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There were trials and plans, but Mosquitos never actually operated from carriers. Eric "Winkle" Brown who was the chief naval test pilot at RAE Farnborough at the time, did deck-landing and takeoff trials aboard HMS Indefatigable on 25th March 1944. This was the first landing of a twin-engine aircraft aboard a Royal Navy carrier, and his memoirs (Wings On My ...


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The "Sea Mosquito" was tested in March 1944 with carrier deck landing trials on HMS Indefatigable in the Irish Sea. The pilot (almost inevitably) was the legendary Eric 'Winkle' Brown. He discussed the trials in a 2015 video, where he noted several problems with using the Mosquito in carrier operation, not the least of which was that the carrier’s ...


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Never Tank and armored vehicles were main difference between WW2 and WW1, and major technological breakthrough that make us think about WW1 as static and WW2 as mobile war(fare). This was recognized during WW2 itself, and there was a large focus on destroying or disabling enemy armored formations. Aircraft, as another technical novelty, was considered as an ...


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To the question of the OP, what was the effective visibility radius, there is no straightforward answer: it depends of where you are, what was the weather, what is the training of the pilots to detect and identify ships, etc... But speaking specifically of Midway's battle, there is an answer: East of the fighting zone, the weather was : Partly cloudy. ...


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The 'Tank Busters'. From 'Myth of the Tankbuster' (HistoryNet) [T]he RAF was the first air force to field a dedicated anti-tank airplane, the Hawker Hurricane Mark IID, armed with two Vickers S 40mm cannons firing tungsten-tipped rounds. First in action at Bir Hakim in June 1942, No. 6 Squadron’s pilots quickly discovered one of the key ...


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