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Westcar Papyrus According to the World History Encyclopedia there are ancient Egyptian writings named the Westcar Papyrus and regarding magic and miracles dating as far back as approximately 2040 BC. Stories from the Westcar Papyrus, World history encyclopedia The Westcar Papyrus, dated to the Second Intermediate Period of Egypt (1782 - c.1570 BCE), but ...


10

This is at least partly correct. Egyptian titulaturs for pharaoh and Egyptian royal titulary changed significantly over time and between dynasties. What is remarkable in this context is that 'pharaoh' only became used to represent 'king' in the middle of the second millennium BCE. In inscriptions it was often only to be read as 'Horus did this and that', ...


8

Eric Peet, on page 117 of The Rhind Mathematical Papyrus offers what may be your explanation: So it would appear that des should describe the unit of liquid volume which would fill a des-jug, and that unit is unique (or at least originally referred to) to an item of the particular design of the des-jug.


6

Thutmose I It would be very unlikely that Hatshepsut managed to convince the people of the time that she was a man, considering she was the eldest daughter of Thutmose I, according to the Britannica. Hatshepsut, Britannica encyclopedia Hatshepsut, the elder daughter of the 18th-dynasty king Thutmose I Thutmose I, by Captmondo Thutmose II What would make ...


6

A Pharaoh must rule over all of Egypt; other sovereigns who rule over only part of Egypt are mere kings. One might think of Pharaoh being similar to a German or Anglo-Saxon King of Kings, except for the absence of subordinate kings. I would definitely not use Emperor as a synonym, as I can find no indication that the tile of Pharaoh implies imperial ...


6

The significance of Tutankhamun's tomb is simply that it's the only Ancient Egyptian royal tomb ever found that had not been stripped by looters. It seems to have been raided twice, fairly soon after the burial, but was re-sealed each time. It escaped further looting because the entrance was lost under subsequent building work. The quantity and magnificence ...


4

No, its not. In fact, that appears to be nonsense. However, its interesting 17th century nonsense. The obelisk in question, I'm not sure where the original is, but there's a copy to this day standing at a fountain in the Piazza Navona in Rome. As for the original... The obelisk, made of Aswan granite, has an interesting history. It is connected with the ...


4

Technically speaking, ancient Egyptian rulers wre all kings, and pharaoh was more or less a nickname for the ruler which later gradually became an official title. Pharaoh (/ˈfɛəroʊ/, US also /ˈfeɪ.roʊ/;[3] Coptic: ⲡⲣ̅ⲣⲟ Pǝrro) is the common title now used for the monarchs of ancient Egypt from the First Dynasty (c. 3150 BCE) until the annexation of Egypt ...


4

In general, they didn't. First off, some terms. Technically a nation is a coherent culture of people, so polyglot empires like Rome's or the Ottoman's don't qualify. It would probably be better to talk about Governments, or Sovereign States. Let's look at Rome. It was around from 509BC to 1453AD by some accounts. However, it wasn't at all the same government ...


4

Tl;DR As Ba'al is a King of the Gods and the Hedjet is certainly associated with royalty through Nekheb and Horus and the Pharaohs, it leaves little doubt in my mind that Ba'al wearing such a crown would certainly show people unknown with the god to instantly recognize him as a deity of great royal importance, just as a king could recognize another king by ...


4

Because Shields and Armor Changed It was not because Bronze was softer or more brittle than iron as the accepted answer stipulates The khopesh was mostly abandoned between ~1200-1100BCE which coincides nicely with the bronze age collapse, but the fact that it was historically made out of bronze has little to do with why the design was abandoned. Properly ...


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I found something, but I don't know how it jibes with the context you saw it in. I came across a presentation by Chaogui Zhang titled History of Mathematics: Hellenic Traditions that actually defines the period as 800BC to 800 CE. If I'm reading their slides right, they seem to be implying a shift of historical focus from river valley civilizations (Egypt ...


3

I'm the editor who had added the info to Wikipedia. I heavily expanded the novel's article in 2018, but had maybe gotten a touch lazy when I began tackling the section about historical accuracy, with terse explanations; I had suddenly become busy with real life, and soon returned my sources to the library. I have now added to the bit about the day of the ...


2

Women in Ancient Egypt According to the world history encyclopedia women did indeed enjoy the same rights as men. With those rights being decided by social class, and not sex, just the same as men. World history encyclopedia In ancient Egypt a woman enjoyed the same rights under the law as a man. What her de jure [rightful entitlement] rights were depended ...


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This is not a definitive answer, but I just read some lists of proverbs from various cultures and compiled a few below. The two things I would say are held in common by the samples below: The heart is the seat of emotion, whether joy or sorrow. The heart is the seat of moral character, whether virtue or wickedness. In our modern understanding, we might ...


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Orion correlation theory This is most likely connected to the Orion correlation fringe theory put forward by Robert Bauval. Orion correlation theory, History, Wikipedia The Orion correlation theory was put forward by Robert Bauval Photograph of Robert Bauval on the right, by Filipov Ivo 10,500 BC The theory, as written in "the Mars mystery" ...


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Its Language Pharaoh is the Term people use to refer to the leader or king of Egypt. Pharoah is not that different from a king. The term Phaora is just pure language and not a "New Invention".


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Chapter 64 is an old one and only in Late Period texts, authored by the priests, monsters with legs stuck on the neck and buttocks on the head can be found. The text in question has been copied many times and mistakes are expected. If, however, we have some respect for ancient texts, we have to try to discover what was in the mind of the original author. The ...


1

A History of the Persian Empire According to the book from Pierre Briant, as revealed on citation 9 on Wikipedia, From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire there is absolutely no debate to be had on who the pharoah of the time was, with that being Psamtik III. Conquest of Egypt and its surroundings, Wikipedia By 526 BC, Amasis II had died, ...


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Dynastic list List of pharoahs - Wikipedia The Dynastic list as mentioned elsewhere takes us to a Wikipedia page, and right at the bottom of that page we read that according to Von Beckerath (Citation 2) and "The Book of the Pharaohs" (Citation 110), the last Roman emperor to be conferred the title of pharaoh was Maximinus Daia 311–313 AD. Dynastic ...


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