27

Coins, dedications, and other 'ritual' objects have been buried in the foundations of buildings since prehistory. The function of these artefacts is unclear, but they do not appear to have been placed there for future generations. What you are looking for is usually called a 'time-capsule', and as the Wikipedia article observes: A time capsule is a ...


19

The ancient Sumerians and Babylonians, from about 3000 BC on, used to bury clay tablets in the foundations of their temples and other major buildings giving the name of the king who founded the temple and threatening to curse anyone who might in the future destroy the building. These inscriptions were not addressed to their contemporaries (they were buried ...


6

The earliest evidence of a footrace may well be from Sumer around 2000 BC. You may also want to consider the Sed festival in Egypt which dates back to before 3000 BC and which involved the pharaoh having to complete a race after ruling for 30 years, this in order to prove his fitness to continue to rule. Sumer Sumerian documents also record that some of ...


6

The modern sense of the word "archaeology" is less than 200 years old. Antiquarianism is only 400 years old. Thus, there can't be anything "intended for future archaeologists" more than 400 years old.


3

Summary: we do have evolutionary very old taste receptors that detect proteins, and we probably have rather well regulated protein intake. Knowing that this is protein is not necessary to achieve this. OTOH, while grains + pulses are good protein sources, of course meat, fish, eggs and later on milk are even better sources of protein (higher protein content ...


2

Ba'al was a title of authority of many masculine deities based in the ancient Levant, primarily Phoenicia——which is Canaan in the Bible. The fact is, the Phoenician cities were traders and merchants who sailed around the whole Mediterranean. They had close ties with Egypt when it came to goods and services. If you run a search for Phoenician ivory plaques ...


2

A detail worth considering is that high-protein pulse crops also happen to be nitrogen-fixing. In other words, higher protein crops would have also improved the quality of the soil. Growing them together with cereals would have noticeably increased productivity, even if the nutritional benefits were less obvious.


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