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If any cohorts gave way in battle, he (Augustus) decimated them, and fed the rest on barley. (Suetonius, Life of Augustus, 24.2) More confirmation for the practice, not necessarily always in connection with decimatio: Polybios: 6.37, Frontinus: Stratagems, 4.25/37, Plutarch: Antony 39, Plutarch: Marcellus 25.6, as well as Livius 27.13.9; Cassius Dio 49.27.1,...


5

The Romans did not "inherit" the Greek gods. The Romans practiced the interpretatio romana whereby they identified foreign gods as being their own under different names, just as the Greeks practices interpretatio graeca. Religiously, they tended to use their own terms in their own languages, although it was not unknown for a Roman in Greece to ...


5

Trying a short answer that would sum up what is said farther below: It's because the Greeks were there, representing the most influential cultural area, because their culture did not seem foreign to the Romans, because it was intelligible to them, and seemed to provide superior answers to familiar problems. — Beside its cultural prestige, the Hellenistic ...


1

I probably should not but, since we have no choice but to live through interesting times, I'll provide my perspective - a different one to the accepted answer. Fair warning: keep in mind we're discussing history, not graphic design -- almost nothing aligns neatly in history. Roman history especially. I like it exactly because it's fuzzy and warm, enough to ...


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