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37

For the Anglo-Saxons, the knowledge that it was the Romans whose city it was is less relevant than why those cities were there no more, or, well, why they were in such a poor state. However, for a direct answer, Gildas and Bede describe Britain as part of Rome (though possibly not with a specific statement that "The Romans built these") and this ...


10

The authors of historical texts which reached us knew that Britain was ruled by the Roman empire some time ago. Educated people who wrote historical texts read Latin books, knew some history and knew about Roman empire. But this was a very tiny minority. Most of people were illiterate, and even those who could read have not seen many books, they saw Roman ...


8

Most likely sometime after 25 BC, or even 23 BC. However, there is no concrete evidence; these dates are disputed and have been proposed by historians based on uncertain and / or circumstantial evidence. Cicero Minor disappears from the known historical record after his appointment to the legateship of Syria (then comprising approximately modern-day Syria, ...


2

From the article "Roman Beauty Culture" (Wilner, 1931): [T]he type preferred for the young woman was the tall, stately build which Catullus (Carm. LxxxVI) admits Quintia possesses and which the lover in Terence's Eunuchus (vss. 313-16) contrasts favorably with "our girls, whom their mothers want slope-shouldered, with bound breasts, to make ...


2

Good question. I don't claim to know the full answer, but this quote from Mary Beard's SPQR might shed some light. IN 212 CE the emperor Caracalla decreed that all the free inhabitants of the Roman Empire, wherever they lived, from Scotland to Syria, were Roman citizens. It was a revolutionary decision, which removed at a stroke the legal difference between ...


4

Roman Law is very complex. But many ancient Roman practices existed by universal consent as part of the unwritten 'mos maiorum' - 'practice of the ancestors'. The life and death rights of the paterfamilias were of this nature. Unwritten laws of this sort could fall into abeyance without specific legislation, or, later, be set aside by imperial dictat. So,...


20

This is a Roman bust excavated at the French city of Arles (see also French Wikipedia on Arelate). Currently, it's part of the collection of the Musée de l'Arles antique (previously Musée Lapidaire). Initially, it was assumed that it's a bust of the Roman emperor Augustus (Octavian). You can still find online sources describing the bust as one of Octavian. ...


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