New answers tagged

-1

There is PERHAPS one major distinction between the Ancient Greeks and Romans regarding their religious practice. While the Romans adopted many of the Greek Deities, Mount Olympus was not necessarily as holy or as sacred to the Romans as it was to the Greeks. For the Romans, the construction of the Pantheon in Rome, was arguably, their most sacred site for ...


-3

Medieval Constantinople was on the European side of the Bosporus. The Asian side of Bosporus is largely associated with modern Istanbul and is literally connected by the Galata Bridge-(Wikipedia should have the exact date of its construction, which I believe was built in the middle of the 20th century).


0

Although Constantine was a Roman Emperor, he was not ethnically or genealogically Roman. His Mother, Helena, was Greek, his Father was Illyrian/Albanian and he was born and raised in the Balkans. During his early years, Constantine, would have been exposed to the Latin, Greek and Illyrian languages, due to his geographic, demographic and familial settings. ...


-1

There were a variety of modes of transport within the Greco-Roman world. While the Romans were known for their well paved roads, the Greeks did help to pioneer street plans, with one well preserved street plan that is still functional in Naples, Italy-(which, incidentally, was founded by the Greeks nearly 2700 years ago). These ancient roadways throughout ...


0

I tend to agree with one of the above written statements regarding the existence of Roman Scholars around the 400's AD/CE. The scholarship during this time was primarily located in the East, in places, such as Alexandria, Egypt, as well as Ephesus in Western Asia Minor-(present-day Turkey), Antioch in Syria and Constantinople. There was 1 Roman oriented ...


-1

Books don't survive that long. Outside of the Dead Sea Scrolls and some other examples there are no copies of surviving books, only copies of copies of copies. For Josephus this problem is compounded, in that every surviving copy we have today is a descendant of the copy Eusebius owned in the 4th century. Since a growing number of experts are of the opinion ...


-1

As a rule, they did not speak Greek. Roman generals often wrote in Greek to each other so that their enemies could not understand. On the other hand, Greek alphabet was as common at the time in Europe as Latin alphabet is today. Even Latin alphabet itself is based on Greek alphabet. Many unrelated languages used (often modified) Greek letters for writing. ...


Top 50 recent answers are included