New answers tagged

4

Trying a short answer that would sum up what is said farther below: It's because the Greeks were there, representing the most influential cultural area, because their culture did not seem foreign to the Romans, because it was intelligible to them, and seemed to provide superior answers to familiar problems. — Beside its cultural prestige, the Hellenistic ...


40

If any cohorts gave way in battle, he (Augustus) decimated them, and fed the rest on barley. (Suetonius, Life of Augustus, 24.2) More confirmation for the practice, not necessarily always in connection with decimatio: Polybios: 6.37, Frontinus: Stratagems, 4.25/37, Plutarch: Antony 39, Plutarch: Marcellus 25.6, as well as Livius 27.13.9; Vegetius Mil. 1.13; ...


1

I probably should not but, since we have no choice but to live through interesting times, I'll provide my perspective - a different one to the accepted answer. Fair warning: keep in mind we're discussing history, not graphic design -- almost nothing aligns neatly in history. Roman history especially. I like it exactly because it's fuzzy and warm, enough to ...


4

The Romans did not "inherit" the Greek gods. The Romans practiced the interpretatio romana whereby they identified foreign gods as being their own under different names, just as the Greeks practices interpretatio graeca. Religiously, they tended to use their own terms in their own languages, although it was not unknown for a Roman in Greece to ...


24

There’s a detailed description of the mosaic in Meyboom’s The Nile Mosaic of Palestrina, and in this answer I will be mostly quoting from this work. Organization of the mosaic It has always been agreed that there is an essential difference in content between the upper and lower half of the mosaic so that actually consists of two parts. In the upper part we ...


11

According to both Livy (died circa. AD 17) and Dionysius of Halicarnassus (died after 7 BC), Mettius Fufetius's intention was to observe how the battle went and then join the winning side. In doing so, he was prepared to betray both sides for he had made promises to both the Romans and the Etruscans. Livy attributes this prevarication to a lack of courage. ...


-4

The answer to this question is very simple. He never thought of taking Rome, he always thought after Rome suffered so many defeats, the Battle of Cannae the worst, he only thought that Rome will Sue for peace after so many defeats, many say the reasons why he didn't attack Rome was his army too small, or he was afraid of soldiers protecting Rome, what are ...


Top 50 recent answers are included