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166

A hunting dog (tesem) named Akbaru is depicted in the tomb of the Fourth Dynasty pharaoh Khufu (died c. 2566 BC). There is a stone relief dated to circa 2400 BC from the Fifth Dynasty showing a dog called Beha, probably a greyhound. The name Beha is possibly an abbreviation of "behkai" (oryx antelope), a dog's name known from other contexts Beha, ...


23

Somebody has compiled info about Roman dogs, mostly literary (Ovid) but also a few real ones, although sources for 'real' dogs may be questionable. https://www.unrv.com/culture/names-for-roman-dogs.php The oldest one appears to be this: Perseus. m. The name of the dog of Aemilia Tertia, daughter of the 2nd century BC Roman consul Lucius Aemilius Paullus ...


20

Long before well known Cerberus from Greek mythology the Mesopotamian goddess Bau, later named Gula, is depicted with a dog's head: Bau seems originally to have been goddess of the dog; as Nininsina she was long represented with a dog’s head, and the dog was her emblem. This dates from around 3300 B.C. when depictions of collared dogs appear in art. ...


13

In a 1960 article Pigeons in a Pelican, B. F. Skinner gave an account of his experiments, the problems he encountered and how they were overcome. The details are too lengthy to cite in full here, but his final demonstration (1944) before the project was rejected shows that - on an experimental level in a laboratory - the system showed promise. A later ...


11

Yup. Although not vital to the war, they were useful. First, WW1 was the first war to use chemical weapons. Due to dogs superior sense of smell, they could smell oncoming gas attacks and and alert their handlers, thus minimizing the effect of the poison gas before gas masks could be donned. Another use was guarding. This was not really specific to WW1. ...


11

Short answer Although we don't have much detail on how this large animal was handled beyond "muzzled and chained" and "collar and a ‘stout cord’", it is likely that the white bear was relatively tame and that its keeper was experienced at handling the animal. The experience of late 19th century / early 20th century circus keepers was that polar bears were ...


10

Cats in ancient Egypt were certainly revered, and there are suggestions that they may have been regarded as "demi-gods in their own right". In later periods, the cat came to be associated with the Goddess Baset, and it is because of this association that so many cats were mummified. Similar associations exist between other commonly mummified animals and a ...


9

Riding a horse is a hell of a lot more fun than riding a donkey. So from a pure pleasure aspect, moderns are far more likely to want to maintain a horse for amusement than a donkey. The ceremonial aspects are almost entirely down to the horse being a central animal of warfare for millennia. This produced an air of romance around the horse that does not ...


9

According to Five thousand years of livestock in Britain Biological Journal of Linnean Society (1989), 38: 31-37 : There may also have been some interbreeding between domestic and wild cattle in Britain during the prehistoric period, but by 3000 years ago the aurochs was probably extinct (Clutton-Brock, 1986). The latest radiocarbon date for the ...


9

Skinner's work was pretty good, but in his analysis on why it was discarded he might be ignoring several factors outside of his area of expertise. First of all - while in his " Pigeons in Pelican" article Skinner states that no other guidance system existed for the bomb, in fact, Pelican already had two of them - televised and semi-active radar homing; ...


8

I found an interesting paper that gives some numbers similar but slightly different from those in Pieter's source. U.S. Equine Population During Mechanization of Agriculture and Transportation: 1900 21,531,635 1905 22,077,000 1910 24,042,882 1915 26,493,000 1920 25,199,552 1925 22,081,520 1930 18,885,856 1935 16,676,000 1940 13,931,531 1945 11,629,000 1950 ...


8

This is somewhat difficult to pinpoint to a single date. But from the basics to narrow the search: wild animals have been used for entertainment from pre-history, bears or tame-bears being among the most popular from the beginning. So that doesn't really give us a starting point for a search. But the invention of the bicycle does: Bicycles were introduced ...


8

The name al-batriq was first used by bishara zalzal in the article named al-batriq. The article is published in al-muktatef magazine on june 1878. In that article he talked about the penguin and he said "I used al-batriq as the Arabic name for this bird because in Latin it is named penguin which means the "chubby bird" and batriq means the same thing in ...


8

Ok, this is an answer to the literal question, not the spirit of the question: The largest place named after an animal is the Tadpole Galaxy as it has a volume in the millions of cubic light years and appears to be the only named galaxy named after an animal.


8

T.E.D. is right here. It is mentioned that Jorrocks "trotted home". A "trot" is a type of horse gait. Therefore, Jorrocks is most likely a horse, and presumably Street was the owner of Jorrocks. Jorrocks is actually a somewhat famous horse name (the name of a famous racing horse), so it makes sense as a horse name (though the original would have been long ...


7

I'm betting they don't really mean brains, that they are talking instead about the spermaceti organ in sperm whale's head. Spermaceti was valuable. They certainly wouldn't skip collecting the spermaceti. See also this article on sperm oil, a major commercial product.


7

The people who invented this proverb had somewhat different lifestyle from yours. And lived in different environment. They worked the land. For them a horse was not a liability but an asset. And these people were the majority of population. So even if one of them had no grass to feed a horse, or no desire to work with it, s/he would easily sell it. Even if ...


7

Well at least there is social commentary in the form of cartoons. St. Louis Post-Dispatch cartoonist Bill Mauldin drew a cartoon of a dog with its own personal fallout shelter, which was widely reprinted. On the fallout shelter debate Mauldin observed, “The government provided plans for do-it-yourselfers, and speculators got rich selling family-size ...


7

Cthonic sacrifices generally resulted in the animals being burnt entire. Totally cremating doves meant the smell of burnt feathers as well as burning meat. Normally sacrifices resulted in bones and fat being burnt for the gods on high altars. I suspect the height was not only part of the spectacle but got the greasy smoke above the heads of the crowd rather ...


7

I'm looking at the list of battles involving war elephants The Battle of Ipsus wiki page, a conflict between some of the successor states of Alexander the great, has an interesting passage on elephant-cavalry interactions: "The ancient sources repeatedly emphasize the effect of elephants on horses, which are alarmed by the smell and noise of elephants and ...


7

A lot of it comes from conditioning and training the animal to battle conditions along with genetics. For horses, Kikkuli, the master horse trainer of Hittites in 1345 BCE, described his methods for conditioning horses or chariot warfare in one of the first horse training treatises. His methods aren't too far removed from techniques used today. Europeans, ...


7

First, to get an idea of what a ship might be provisioned with, here's the meat the British Sloop Alert in 1777 carried with her for 60 men. Beef 462 pieces in 6 barrels weighing 2238 lbs Pork 777 pieces in 5 barrels weighing 1753 lbs Those numbers cut down to 42% for a crew of 25 means 940 lbs of beef and 736 lbs of pork. Another way to look at it is ...


7

As a supplement to Schwern's answer, from Janet MacDonald's book on provisioning ships during the Napoleonic period What is noticiable when studying these log reports of killing cattle is the great disparity in weights, beasts producing anything between 140 and 675 pounds of meat. This was not a random thing, but more or less related to where they came from....


7

Apparently the rule did exist. John Dundas Cochrane clarified its origin in his Narrative of a pedestrian journey through Russia and Siberian Tartary, from the frontiers of China to the Frozen sea and Kamtchatka; performed during the years 1820, 1821, 1822, and 1823: Much benefit has been derived to the colony from the exertions of the present Chief, ...


6

I think that TRiG is probably closest... The hare-haggada connection, as explained in the article, is a medieval Jewish appropriation of the hare-hunt motif, retroactively attached to the jag den Has/YaKNeHZ pun, and ultimately it probably relates to the hare/rabbit as a springtime symbol appropriate for the Pesah celebration (as well as the persecuted-but-...


6

This happening is known as The Great Hanoi Rat Massacre. It took place in 1902 in Hanoi, which was a French colony at that time. At the beginning action was a success, but as the bounty was granted for every rat's tail, soon the town was occupied by rats with cut out tails, that were left alive for breeding, and there were more and more rat farms in the ...


6

The Wiki-biography on George E. Waring Jr., Street Commissioner of New York City 1894-1898, is informative. At the time of his appointment to this post NYC was awash in (mostly) horse manure, shin-deep, with predictions that the city's first floors would soon be manured under. Outfitting his workers in sparkling-clean white uniforms, and instilling an ...


6

HISTORICAL (NAMED) ANIMALS Alexander the Great, in addition to naming numerous cities after himself, also named cities after his horse, Bucephalus, (example: Alexandria Bucephalous and Phalia), and one city after his dog, Peritas. This is also cited by John Kistler: Just as Alexander’s horse Bucephalus would have cities names in his honor, so Peritas had ...


6

This got to be a bit long for comments, so I'm moving the content here. farmers sent away their hunters to be trained for harness work. Many riding horses took badly to this humble duty, but Street’s Jorrocks trotted home like a gentleman. This is presumably simply a real-world example of a farmer and his horse, of the type he's talking about. In ...


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