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40

The leading people of the Ottoman empire were not Arabs, but from Turkish tribes. They speak a variety of the Turkish languages (Ottoman Turkish). Turkish is its own language family, Arabic belongs to the Afro-Asiatic/Semitic language family. Big areas of the empire were Arab, but there where also big non-Arab areas and peoples (Greece, Albania, the former ...


25

That is actually a false perception that All Arabs consider themselves to be descendants of Ishmael. According to Arab traditions, Arabs categorized themselves into two main branches1: Adnanites عدنانى Qahtanites - قَحْطَانِي Among these two, only the Qahtanites, those who are believed to have originated in Southern tips of Arabian peninsula (Mainly ...


15

The critical factor all these answers leave out: The Black Death. The Plague of Justinian swept through the Byzantine and Sassanid Empires a few generations before Islam. On the Byzantine side, the reduction in manpower available for warfare was near 90%. The damage to the economies of both empires made it unlikely they'd rebuild the population losses ...


14

Long lasting wars between Sassanians and Byzantine empire had made cripple armed forces of both of them and made their borders vulnerable. Lakhmids were acting as a buffer state between nomad Arabs and Persia. But Khosrow II made them into neutral force practically. the practice made Iran's southern border more vulnerable. Kavadh II massacred a lot of ...


13

This is because the English word for the country of Jordan is ultimately derived from the biblical Hebrew word for the Jordan River, not from the modern Arabic name for the country. After World War I, the region was made a British protectorate called Transjordan (as Pieter Geerkens points out), although English use of "Transjordan" predates the ...


12

To address Mark C Wallace's point, being ethnically Arabic and speaking the Arabic language are not the same thing. Arabic people existed long before the language we now call Arabic developed, albeit we tend not to refer to them as Arabic until the era of the spread of Islam and the Arabic language. This is not a detailed answer, and it relies on Wikipedia (...


10

At about 80 million people, Egypt has about as many people as the rest of the Arab nations combined, and by far the strongest military in the region. Leaving it out of an "Arab League" is just plain unsustainable. According to Syria and the Middle East Peace Process, the sticking point on getting Egypt back was Syria. Particularly Asad. In the wake of the ...


9

Byzantium and Persia were both greatly weakened by titanic wars they had fought with each other during the reign of Heraclius - at one point Byzantium was surrounded, and at another Heraclius was taking Persia's capital city. But aside from that, there was a structural weakness in the Eastern provinces near where Islam was being born - the Monophysite ...


8

The name al-batriq was first used by bishara zalzal in the article named al-batriq. The article is published in al-muktatef magazine on june 1878. In that article he talked about the penguin and he said "I used al-batriq as the Arabic name for this bird because in Latin it is named penguin which means the "chubby bird" and batriq means the same thing in ...


8

Much of that seems exaggerated (as you'd expect for a book portraying a young child's point of view). Gaddafi imposed restrictions on private property but never totally abolished it. Law 4 in 1978 restricted people to one plot of land to build a house on; Law 7 in 1986 abolished private ownership of land, though people could still own their own home. After ...


8

There is little reason to believe in the historicity of Abraham. He could be a real person, a character composite of many different people, a symbolic representation, or just entirely fictional. And accordingly, there wouldn't be any proof as such that anyone is descended from him. Even if archaeologists were to miraculously stumble upon his remains, it is ...


4

German troops operated in three of the countries in that region. To call them invasions would be misleading. The word "presence" in your title is about right. In Libya, the Germans were only there to assist the Italians. The Italians were the civil authority in that country and any anti-European resentment was directed their way rather than towards the ...


4

I am no expert on the topic, but I know Arabic and I have access to sources in Arabic (but disclaimer, I am a Sunni Muslim, so my sources are "Wahhabist" sources, and I do not agree with that misleading term "Wahhabism", but just you would understand). From Al Alukah Website, an author called Shareef AbdulAziz Al-Zuhairi wrote: "The Sad Ending: The new ...


4

This is by no means a complete answer, but is far too long for a comment. tl; dr It does seem that there is no complete published list of the resolutions taken by the Arab League from its foundation in Cairo in June 1945. The lists that are available have been compiled from various sources, some of which are now available online, and these are listed ...


3

The Maronites sharing power with two more parts of state instead of just the Druzes might seem strange. But before, in the 19th century, the situation largely favoured the Druzes, especially in the so called mixed areas of the two qaim-mayqamam. The Druzes and Maronites also didn't share power as much as they were forced to cooperate by the Ottomans and told ...


2

The Joint Defense Council (JDC) and the Permanent Military Commission (PMC) of the Arab League were created, with the JDC in existence until at least August 2015. Since then, both bodies seem to have been superseded by or absorbed into other organizations. There is no mention of either organization on the current Arab League website, but both organizations ...


2

Genealogy is family history based on records. There exists no such records that far back in time, so the question is not answerable. If we widen the question more, some sort of answer is possible however: People having been living in Arabia since the first humans migrated out of Africa, and as pretty much everywhere in the world, they have moved in and out ...


2

The quotation below comes from A Short Story of Arab Peoples by J.B. Glubb, 1969, page 275. The book say nothing about direct actions against both British or the Turks. When the Turkish Empire entered the First World War, Ibn Rasheed declared his support for the sultan, while Ibn Saud asked for help from the British government in India. Captain W.H.I ...


1

The relations between Nazi Germany and the Arab world are well-documented. As a general rule, the Arabs and other occupants of North Africa tended to be politically neutral. Many people in the Tunis and other areas under Italian occupation were probably not too happy to see the Germans. On the other hand, Egyptian nationalists were secretely hoping to be rid ...


1

On August 31, 1918, President Wilson wrote a letter to Rabbi Stephen Samuel Wise which referred to the Balfour Declaration and said in part: I welcome an opportunity to express the satisfaction I have felt in the progress of the Zionist movement in the United States... This letter was published a few days later, September 5th, 1918, in the New York ...


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