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51

The answer lies in your second map, and the extensive exploration of Siberia's Arctic sea coast through the 1600's in search of a Northern Passage. Note how well mapped that area has become in the intervening century. Russian settlers and traders on the coasts of the White Sea, the Pomors, had been exploring parts of the northeast passage as early as the ...


7

Whether it was 2 years or 200 years, the academic consensus was that it was incredibly fast. I would likely lean more toward the longer time-frame, as the archaeological record is more consistent with a "slower" migration. Stuart Fiedel gives the mainstream account of a migration that took around 100-150 years. The Thule culture, which is ancestral to ...


7

Semaphore's hypothesis was right. I found interesting resource which tells us that islands actually had been considered terra nullius till 1926. Until the year 1926 the islands had been considered "Terra Nullius", or other words, "No Man's Land". However, following practices of Canada, the Soviet Union claimed that all land in the sector between ...


5

First: I have a problem with what I see as an implicit assumptions in the question that primitive peoples were simpletons. To understand the phenomena of midnight sun only a few straightforward facts need to be recognized: Time can be measured. Days are longer in summer and shorter in winter. The variation in day length is more extreme as you approach the ...


5

No, they didn't. There is no evidence of human occupation in Iceland before Irish monks and later the Vikings settled there. Eskimo technology wasn't bad at all, kayaks are pretty nifty boats. But not suitable for migration.


3

Your basic assumption that there is Canadian control of everything between Greenland and Alaska is more or less true. But there are a few existing problems of sovereignty between the two countries of Canada and Denmark (Greenland). Grise Fiord, Nunavut is located at the southern tip of Ellesmere Island and Grise Fiord is only one of three permanent ...


3

Well, they did, but not before they were discovered by europeans. Some inuits have moved to Denmark since Denmark had Greenland under their jurisdiction.


3

From the Wikipedia page on Svalbard, the area was being used as a base for arctic exploration, so quite possibly he was hoping to run into another expedition that could evacuate him. Given that he walked across the ice-pack for a year it may not be as crazy as it sounds, though if he hadn't run into Jackson he would have had to wait until 1897.


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