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158

Actually, good arguments can be put forward for both dates as the the 'start' of World War 2. In fact a number of other dates have also been suggested for the 'start' of World War 2, including: Japan seizing Manchuria from China in 1931. Italy’s invasion and defeat of Abyssinia (Ethiopia) in 1935 Adolf Hitler’s re-militarization of Germany’s Rhineland in ...


56

Based on what you've told us, your teacher is most likely thinking of the Proto-Indo-European people (Note: I am NOT saying it is accurate to call the PIE people "Proto-Ukrainians"). According to the most mainstream theory, the Kurgan hypothesis, these speakers of the ancient Proto-Indo-European language emerged from the Pontic-Caspian steppes some 6-8,000 ...


50

Siberia was colonized earlier than the 18/19th centuries. There actually were a few challenges by great powers to Russia's colonial empire as it expanded and later: from China to some extent early on, if one is willing to count the latter as a great power in the 16-18th centuries, and later from Great Britain and Japan in the 19th century. Russia conquered ...


44

Because it was the participation of the British and French empires, beginning with Declarations of War against Germany on Sept. 3, 1939, that turned several isolated regional conflicts into a World War. The other conflicts of the 1930's had either already substantially ceased (as the Italo-Ethiopian and Spanish Civil wars) or been strictly regional affairs ...


31

Short Answer The Wikipedia entry for World War II uses the start date of 1 September 1939 because Wiki is applying the Wikipedia definition of the term "world war" as a basis, for internal consistency. One must start with a definition of that term to formulate an answer as to why. Long Answer Many good answers here already - each with valid points to ...


30

Well there were a few reasons They pretty much had all they needed resource-wise in the country, trade was not a prerogative and even though Zheng He did go out exploring they were not interested in colonies or mercantilism. Mercantilism was pretty much frowned upon within the Confucian system, merchants did not produce goods they moved them around and made ...


28

Because China was actually pretty far from India. For most of the past millennia, China and India were not "neighbouring countries" in any meaningful sense of the word. Most Chinese empires did not actually stretch all the way to the Indian subcontinent. It seems you're considering China and India based on their modern borders, but that is misleading: ...


20

This is a good question that must come to many people's minds when they see the two very similarly sized (Taiwan only slightly larger) islands. The similarities are a even more numerous than the visual. They were both long at the margins of power in Chinese empires, had significant minorities who vigorously defended their autonomy (in Hainan it was the Li)...


19

Short Answer Roughly speaking, in the early decades after 1867: ~7% became educators ~16% became public servants ~25% became corporate employees the rest became unemployed or farmers Overview Most of them actually did not do particularly well. After the Meiji Restoration, the samurai became the new shizoku class and initially received stipends from a ...


19

First off, I think Semaphore's answer has it right (which is why I upvoted it). Your teacher is almost certainly thinking of the Proto-Indo-Europeans. "Proto-" is a prefix commonly used to talk about the theoretical common ancestors of several seemingly related languages. Thus "Proto-Indo-European" would refer to the ancestors of all Indo-European speakers. ...


16

Another Wikipedia article might hold your answer. News of Japan's surrender didn't reach everyone all at once (as you'd expect), though it is surprising how many Japanese soldiers were still holding out for years. According to that article, the following number of soldiers surrendered or were killed (by decade): 1940s: 85 1950s: 34 1960s: 2 1970s: 4 As ...


15

Your question assumes that some kind of a formal decision was made and that most countries explicitly agree that there is an official demarcation. As this boundary is mostly cartographical, no country has ever, to the best of my knowledge, made an issue out of this location. It's been the practice to just use whatever demarcation that other cartographers ...


15

Kind of, but not as such. The closest to what you're probably thinking of is the nihonjin-machi that began to form in the Pacific around the same time as Europe's Renaissance. These were primarily mercantile communities, but later also housed significant numbers of samurais, Christians and other exiles from Japan. None of them survived after the early modern ...


14

One of the major reasons why Spanish invasion of Americas was so successful was that Columbus voyages came just in the right time: Spanish had a huge standing army of war-toughened soldiers with nothing to do, nothing to lose, and eager for adventure. Serendipitously, in the same year as Columbus discovered America, Spaniards drove Moors out of Iberian ...


13

The people living along the northern coastline of Australia, in the Kimberley, Arnhem Land, Gulf of Carpentaria and Cape York had encounters with various visitors for many thousands of years. People and traded goods moved freely between Australia and New Guinea. Indonesian "Bajau" fishermen from the Spice Islands (e.g. Banda) have fished off the coast of ...


12

Only four Asian teams – Burma, India, Indonesia and the Philippines - entered the 1950 World Cup qualification rounds and these were placed in Group 10 with the top team qualifying for the finals in Brazil. According to the article India and the 1950 FIFA World Cup: "What If...", the reason that Burma, the Philippines and Indonesia withdrew was that ... ...


11

As to why en.wikipedia lists particular start dates, I commend to you en.wikipedia’s arcane consensus policies, the article’s page history and talk page history. For why anglophone editors from the global north construe the texts they read to support their edit warring, I supply the following: Popular conceptions of history reflect myth-making, national ...


10

SHORT ANSWER There is evidence of the use of dictionaries and dialogues but we should not imagine that the resources available came anywhere close to matching the vast array of second language learning materials that are available today. It is also highly likely that what are today known as authentic materials (objects, texts etc which people encounter in ...


10

Well, written language was, at the time, an economic tool primarily. It was used to record business, political and liturgical transactions, and to cary on a conversation at a distance through correspondance. The things we use it for, instructive texts (such as language instruction courses) and recreational reading, developed much, much later. But! There ...


10

Yes, your suspicion is correct. Once man had boats (no later than 40,000 years ago) and the ability to live in the arctic, the island chains strung across the Bering Straight could not have been a significant barrier. There are native peoples who traverse it regularly today using native methods. As for evidence, archeologically we know about the Thule ...


10

This is not really true because there is no such thing as "proto-Ukrainian people". Both Ukrainians and Russians were invaders who came to their current homelands between 350 AD and 1000 AD. In other words, they were relatively recent immigrants, certainly long after any invasion of India took place. When the Ukrainians originally invaded the area was ...


10

What your teacher teaches you is unfortunately a complete nonsense and political propaganda. There were no "Ukrainians" until the 17 century, and the notion of "proto-Ukrainians" (as people who lived of this territory) is unscientific. This is a good example of the use of history for political propaganda. Very many different peoples lived on the territory ...


9

I would like to emphasize the role that the Chinese mindset played. As MichaelF mentioned, the attitude of the rulers dictated the direction of China's advancements. Belief that China was "perfect" and had everything necessary was reinforced by Confucian notions of harmony and society. Signs of political and military weakness that appeared near the end of ...


9

The Sri Lankan Civil War was a war where the Sri Lankan government fought the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, who were lead by Velupillai Prabhakaran. Velupillai Prabhakaran was killed on May 19 (or 18 depending on your sources), 2009, the Tigers of Tamil Eelam admitted defeat on May 17th, 2009, and the government declared the Civil War over on May 19th, ...


9

"Europe" can mean different things depending on context. To geologists, there is no such thing as a distinct European land-mass since it is inseparable from Asia (hence Eurasia). Politically, Europe might mean the member states of the EU or the EEC. In sporting terms, Israel and Kazakhstan are in Europe. According to Turkey, country is entirely in Europe, ...


9

There is no good answer to this question as posed, because many Asian-American ethnicities are poorer than the U.S. general public. In fact, Asian Americans' high incomes are largely due to Indian Americans, which is not necessarily the group most Americans think of when they hear the term "Asian American." Let's look at a 2012 Pew study of "The Rise of ...


9

The history is disputed between the Rakhine and Rohingya, but in essence it is related to population movement between the Chittagong region (now south-eastern Bangladesh) and Arakan (now Rakhine state in Burma/Myanmar), and so whether the Rohingya should be seen as recent immigrants or as indigenous people. Most Rakhine, Burmese and Buddhists from other ...


8

Good Fences Make Good Neighboors The answer consists of 1 word - Himalayas. Okay, let me add the second word: Tibet. Basically, the two cultures have been completely separated by an insurmountable barrier (not to mention that the fact that India and China share a border today is an artifact of the 20th century, when China annexed Tibet).


8

They are tibetan buddhist prayer flags. More info here.


8

One theory I have read—I believe Jared Diamond—is that Europe's diversity and fragmented nature spurred innovation, while the united China was much easier to control. To explain that: China produced more Iron, better ships etc. than similarly situated European nations in the early 1600s but when the empire's bureaucracy feared the growing power of the ...


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