12

The Babylonians and Assyrians had several versions of a king list, at least one of which enumerated the kings from the Old Babylonian period down to the Neo-Assyrian period. There is also a much older Sumerian king list, copies of which were discovered in Neo-Assyrian sites, so it is evident that these texts were still being copied and read many centuries ...


8

Judea has always been a key part of the "land bridge" that connects what we now know as the Arab world, specifically north Africa and the Middle East. In biblical times, Judea was the gateway by which Egypt attacked Middle Eastern countries, and vice-versa. In 146 BC For instance, Ptolemy VI, aided by Jonathan Macabee, had invaded Syria and captured ...


7

The area had multiple claims to fame. From a strategic viewpoint, it connected the Tigris and Euphrates basin to the Nile basin, as already mentioned by Tom. It was also part of the fertile crescent, a moist and fertile tract of agricultural land compared to its otherwise arid and semi-arid surroundings: The Eastern Mediterranean wasn't as hot and dry ...


6

The winged disk in Ancient Egypt usually represents the god Horus-Behdety, and yes it is known from the Old Kingdom. I couldn't find any references online (other than the Wikipedia article) to monuments created by Sneferu which include representations of Horus-Behdety. However, the earliest representation is supposed to be in a carving in the Step Pyramid ...


6

The Bronze-Age site in the Tollense Valley is an interesting one. However, I would treat many of the claims in that article with caution. To date, only a few peer-reviewed papers have been published, and in particular we are still waiting for the reports documenting the human osteo-archaeology in detail. Furthermore, some of the claims in that article do ...


3

Adding to @Timothy's answer: I concur that there are no detailed accounts of the destruction of the Hittites. However, there appear to be at least two very, very short and incomplete accounts: Ugarit was probably under Hittite suzerranity, but maybe not. In any case, it was not far from the core areas of the Hittites. A desperate letter written by king ...


3

Wouldn't these warriors be considered the world's first standing army? Possibly. Am I missing something here or is this archaeological dig that significant? Also, what is this line, "Tollense could force a re-evaluation of the whole period in the area from the Baltic to the Mediterranean", referring to? I'm not too familiar with that time period, ...


2

They were well aware of earlier empires, and many Kings of the subsequent empires would intentionally style themselves as the 'rightful successors' to the previous ones, by taking the names of earlier monarchs(eg. Sargon), or using many of the same titles(eg. King of the Four Quarters).


2

Mediterranean Cultures oiled and styled their beards with curling irons to create ridges or ringlets or dangly spirals.


2

We know that Assur-danin-pal rebelled even before the death of his father, King Shalmaneser III. We know that it was a serious rebellion that spread to at least 27 cities, including Ashur Nineneh, and Arbela. We know that it took four years to put the rebellion down [Kuhrt, 1995, Vol 2 p490]. It seems that the rebellion was eventually put down by Assur-...


2

The problem with determining Tiglath Pileser III's origins is lack of evidence. As Amélie Kuhrt has repeatedly observed in her 2-volume work The Ancient Near East, C. 3000-330 BC, alteration of Assyrian inscriptions in antiquity was commonplace. In the case of Tiglath Pileser III, we have contradictory evidence. As Dr Floyd Nolen Jones noted: It is well ...


1

I am willing to be corrected but as far as I know there is no surviving contemporary source for the circumstances in which the Hittite empire ended. There are various theories see e.g. http://semiramis-speaks.com/causes-of-the-collapse-of-the-hittite-empire-at-the-end-of-the-bronze-age/ but I am not aware that anyone has proved that it was due to civil war....


1

Lots of examples of cannibalism with regards to sieges. Lev,26:29; Deut, 26:53-57; 2 Kgs. 6:28-29: Per. 19:9; Ezek. 5:10; Larn. 2:20; 4:10; It's used as a metaphor in the Bible. A metaphor for how bad things were. Political treaties record parents eating their offspring without any explicit mention of siege, see SA A II 6:449-450, 547-550, 568-569 (...


1

The identity of Xenophon’s Mespila is actually debated. Whereas early researchers took for granted that it was the same place as Nineveh, more recent studies have suggested that it is more likely to have been located in or near Mosul, and it has even been suggested that the modern name Mosul (al-Mawṣil) derives from the name Mespila. Xenophon’s actual ...


1

The Assyrians did not shave. They had beards. Ancient Egyptian reliefs, such as those at Abu Simbel, showing captured Assyrians depict them with beards.


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