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18

First of all, less than 20% of Athenians were citizens, so comparing to the total population voter turnout in the USA may actually be higher. Second, because of the smaller size of Attica as compared to USA the decisions the citizens would vote for had direct consequences to each of them. Third, the voting class was also the class with most citizenship ...


15

Michael's answer is a very good one but I'd like to add a couple of details. First, Athenian citizens were not always as enthusiastic about voting as you'd think: voting required a whole day which meant they'd be missing out on one day of revenue from labor. To compensate for this, Athenians were paid (type f3 and search for paid) about as much as the daily ...


14

Information on how slaves were treated in the 1,000 or so city states other than Athens is thin on the ground; for most of these city states we know next to nothing about them so comparisons between Athens and other cities are very difficult. Further, much of what we do know (even about slaves in Athens where are sources are far better than elsewhere) comes ...


11

Given the lack of a clearer definition by the author, I would imagine that your interpretation of "Control of the seas in the modern sense" being "Mahanian" is probably a good starting point. From A.T. Mahan's perspective, sea power has two aspects; the protection of your interests at sea (and overseas) and your ability to interfere with your enemy's ...


9

The Peloponnesian War (431 to 404 BC) was a testing time for the Athenian judicial system, every victory brought forth new heroes and every loss new scapegoats. The Athenians had lost their strongest asset, the leadership of Pericles, when the plague hit the city in the first year of the war, the lack of an experienced successor and the physical and mental ...


8

The third book of Aristotle's Politics is focused on citizenship and its merits, and from early on it provides enlightening information about the benefits of citizenship: [Aristot. Pol. 3.1274b] But a state is a composite thing, in the same sense as any other of the things that are wholes but consist of many parts; it is therefore clear that we must first ...


8

Premise: I do not have Buxton's book, so my objections are based on other sources. The origin of this claim are to be traced in a series of references. These include: Children of inferior parents, and of the better, when they chance to be deformed, will be put away in some mysterious, unknown place, as they should be. Plato, The Republic, 461 C As to ...


8

There's a model of the Stoa Basileios (or Royal Stoa), seat of the archon basileus, at the end of 5th century BC on the site of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA). This is close to the date (399 BC) that Plato's Euthyphro took place. "Model of the Royal Stoa at the end of 5th c. B.C. with the addition of the annexes. Model realised ...


7

This question probably can't produce anything but opinion-based answers, but I'll take my shot. I would say two factors are at play here: First, the lauding of extravagant praise on an "alien" system was often used by classical-era writers as a method of criticizing flaws in their domestic system. Tacitus' Germania is a typical example of this. Athens ...


7

According to http://www.historyofinformation.com/, the first Latin translation was commissioned by Pope Nicholas V and completed in 1452 by Lorenzo Valla. The image below is from the first page of the first book. My Latin is below basic, but the first line seems interesting, a specific reference to 'Peloponnesian War'.


7

I am unsure if this is the first mention of Thucydides' 'history of the Peloponnesian war' but this is Thomas Hobbes' first sentence, thirteenth paragraph of the section titled 'On the life and history of Thucydides' from "History of the Peloponnesian War, Thomas Hobbes, Ed." It comes from the 1843 translation of his 1628 version. To this I say, that ...


7

This is a complicated issue. One thing seems certain - there was no law against exposure of infants anywhere in Greece, in particular in Athens. (Unlike, say, in the late Roman Empire where such a law was promulgated in 374). It was certainly done occasionally, but whether this was a prevalent or a fringe practice in Athens is a matter of much scholarly ...


7

Edit: I think I have to revise quite a bit. One thing is that the Peloponnesian Wars went through various stages which themselves got different titles (Ionian, Corinthian, etc). As a result the poster on Yahoo Answers may be quite right. In the Ionian War, which crushed Athens, the Persians provided the gold for the Spartan Fleet. In the Corinthian War, ...


6

I believe some of the lists - at least fragmentary ones from epigraphic sources - can be found in Fornara's volume in the "Translated Documents of Greece and Rome" series: http://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/classical-studies/ancient-history/archaic-times-end-peloponnesian-war-2nd-edition


6

According to The Formation of the Greek People, by A. Jarde: The new system took no account of the old politico-religious associations, but created new cults for the new groups; of the four villages of the Marathonian Tetrapolis, three belonged to the tribe Aentis and the fourth to the tribe Pandionis. Tetrapolis (Attica) on Wikipedia: ...


6

There is a vast amount of literature covering the period you are interested in. What follows is but a small sample, but it should set you on your way. The following ancient sources cover 5th century BC Athens. They are not specifically about the daily lives and culture of Athenians but there is much to be gleaned from them. Plutarch's Parallel Lives, ...


3

It should be noted that Cleon wanted to destroy Mytilene; the males killed and the females enslaved. The others are not the people of Mytiline left(because if his policies were to be implemented there would be no one left to rebel) but other Athenian allies. And where he says "ally" you should read "vassal". which of them, think you, is there that will ...


3

I interpret that claim as alluding to galley tactics. Galleys of Antiquity and the Medieval period had severe limitations; cruising relied on wind power which was slow, and in combat they relied on many rowers. Thus any naval action required lots of men, food and water. They could not blockade, in the modern sense, of cutting off all sea trade and ...


3

I believe this question puts the cart before the horse. It is not that (aspects of) Athenian democracy somehow motivated its citizens to great political activity; but that the highly motivated political activity of Athenian citizens created and sustained Athens' democracy. A people always get the government they deserve, and the citizens of ancient ...


2

I found this interview with historian Josiah Ober on the economy of ancient Greece, particularly Athens, interesting on many counts. From the transcript: Athenians, would be called in the center of the main city of Athens. And at that point any citizen -- that is free adult male native of Athens over age 18 -- could come to the assembly, typically ...


2

You were paid for participating in assemblies. You could marry Athenian citizens.


2

A further clarification of the issue would also be to remember that a lot of Athenian citizens actually did not live in the city of Athens itself, but in the smaller cities spread out over Attica. Many of them were situated so far from the city that they did not participate in the day-to-day politics of the state at all. Also, I guess we should ask ...


2

I think I've found it: the Chersonese. Googling for "Cimon exile Attica" landed me in the Perseus site. Andocides, in On the Peace says this: Now take the days when we were fighting Euboea and controlled Megara, Pegae, and Troezen. We were seized with a longing for peace; and, in virtue of his being Sparta's representative at Athens, we recalled ...


2

Allow me to state a few preliminary points before proceeding to answer. The entire paragraph is available here (MIT Classics Archive). I am using the entire paragraph for better context (reproduced below). Cleon (who was debating Diodotus) was the leader of the pro-faction and wanted to carry out the punishment as agreed (on the day before). Diodotus, the ...


2

Question: can one give a good account of the decline of Athenian democracy, in the approximately hundred year span between the Peloponnesian War and conquest by Macedon, that explains it in terms internal systemic socioeconomic weaknesses, building over time, comparable to though clearly not the same as the above example of the decline of republican Rome? ...


1

There was a story of an event that took place in Athens. A group of men were watching an athletic contest. An old man wandered into the auditorium, where all the seats were taken. Finally, one young man arose, and offered the old man his seat. The other young men in the vicinity applauded. The old man said something like, "You Athenians know what to do, but ...


1

You should check out some of the well known playwrights of the era. Aristophanes and Euripides are two good and different examples. Euripides wrote tragedies and Aristophanes wrote comedy, often satirizing tragedies written by Euripides. I also agree with looking at Athenian vase painting. Red figure was the dominant type but white ground vase painting ...


1

I'll add a few extra details which may be of use to you since the scope of the question now seems to include events outside the Peloponnesian war of 431–404 BC Persian gold was said to have made its way into the hands of the prominent Athenian orator and statesmen Demosthenes, who led the opposition forces against Phillip of Macedon and other Pan-Hellenists ...


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