7

In the words of Rudolf Hoess, Commandant of Auschwitz, in his testimony at Nuremburg in 1946: Those who were fit for work were sent into the camp. Others were sent immediately to the extermination plants. Children of tender years were invariably exterminated since by reason of their youth they were unable to work. (my emphasis) So it seems that there ...


7

If inability to work is your main argument, you should remember children have been heavily involved in the work force until recent times.See Child Labor. Children are still used as labor in some parts of the world today: In 2010, sub-saharan Africa had the highest incidence rates of child labour, with several African nations witnessing over 50 percent ...


7

I have not found information relating directly to this individual child you ask about, but there is other discussion of imprisoned children coping with the horrors around them through play. A blog site article Kids, the Holocaust, and “Inappropriate” Play discusses this topic, and brings up a couple of references you might find enlightening, Children and ...


7

Some aspects can and have to observed for that endeavour, some cannot, some just can't be provided by me now, but some you are also free to invent. Of course, try to be careful with what to 'invent' if writing such a story and around that topic. First, the physical aspects: Wikipedia: KZ Auschwitz We see that the actual train rails lead to Kattowitz/...


6

What's absurd (or, at least, one of the things that's absurd) about The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas is not that there was a 9-year old in the camp, but that a 9-year old in the camp had been given a striped uniform and sent off to work. The uniforms given to the camp inmates were not tailored, and frequently ill-fitting as a result. If you look at the famous ...


4

Looks to me like a case of many compounding effects. Firstly, Mala vs Malka. Polish WP entry (and the English one for that matter) both signify that her formal name was Malka Zimetbaum, but she was known as Mala. In this case, the SS used the formal name in a telegram about her while the article has chosen the more friendly method of referring to her. ...


3

I read through a lot of reviews, and the only thing I could find hinting at any inaccuracy at all was his own narrative voice. It turns out he had a life-long battle with depression (before and after the camp). I'm not sure why that particular reviewer thought that fact ought to have been more obvious from the reading, but they did.* I can't find any ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible