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23

Paul von Hindenburg called Hitler a "böhmischer Gefreiter". He (and others) wrongly assumed that Hitler was born in Broumov (called Braunau in German) that is indeed in Bohemia (today Czech Republic). However, that was a mistake, as Hitler was born in the actual town of Braunau in Austria. At the time of Hitler's birth, both towns belonged to the Austro-...


22

At the time nation-states (and in particular France) consolidated themselves, the governance of the German-speaking parts of Europe was based on an older model, small principalities loosely associated in large empires. Consequently, many German thinkers developed a view of the nation as a bound based on ethnicity and, in particular, language and transcending ...


22

Wikipedia (in German) has a long and fascinating article on the history of the German national colours. Without getting in all the details, it seems that the link with the colours of the Holy Roman Empire symbols isn't historically established and might have been a later rationalisation for the choice. Still according to this article, the first use of these ...


20

You are writing fiction - there is no need to be 100% accurate. The Vienna sewer system was, and still is, regarded as one of the most impressive in Europe. Although repairs from WW2 bombing were not completed until 1950, this did not interfere with a fascinating portrayal of the sewer system in 1949's The Third Man. My opinion is that if the protagonists ...


18

The industrial revolution obviously had nothing to do with it. Maria Theresa reigned from 1740 to 1780; the Industrial Revolution only began in Britain from around the 1760s and didn't come to Central Europe until much later. Her laws on forestry were enacted over a period of decades. The measures you cited were clearly motivated by a concern for ...


17

Hitler's ultimate motive was 'Upliftment of the Aryan Race'. For this an auxillary goal was making the 'pure' German Nationality walk tall, and be strong. Hitler was not a exactly a German nationalist, he was a Pan German, strifing for uniting the German race. This essentially opposed the rise of sub - nationalism among various states of German nationality....


15

The obvious interpretation is your point that the position of Vienna was similar to that of Berlin: both were in the eastern part of the country, surrounded by the Soviet occupation zone, even if the position within the city itself was different. So if you drew a line across Europe showing the areas controlled by the Soviet Red Army or by local ...


14

Bavaria joined Prussia after the Franco-Prussian War. Prussia had emerged as the state that could defend "German" interests by leading the Germans in the defeat of France. Earlier, Prussia had beaten Austria in the Seven Weeks War of 1866. Austria had to settle accounts with Hungary after the 1866 war (after having quashed that country's bid for ...


14

The normal ballpark estimate of how much heat a person gives off is comparison to a 100W (sometime 120W) incandescent light bulb. The Theater an der Wien had a capacity of 2,000 in Beethoven's time, which was more than sufficient to heat a building in temperatures only near freezing. Originally, it was “more spacious than any in Vienna”, with a capacity ...


13

I would not put Hitler, Trotsky and Stalin under the title "incubator of intellectual activities". That said, it is indeed true that intellectual activities flourished in the beginning of 20s century in the Austro-Hungarian empire. (Budapest, Prague and Lemberg (now Lviv) also qualify for the surge of intellectual activities at the same time). Your ...


12

Brigitte Hamann's Hitler's Vienna: A Portrait of the Tyrant as a Young Man lists the commitee members. (I've also quoted from her book here). The decision was made by the faculty: professors Rudolf Bacher, Franz Rumpler, Heinrich Lefler, and Kasimiar Pochwalski, but above all, the directors of the two paining schools, Christian Griepenkern and Alois ...


12

I strongly doubt labeling Salzburg as "Stadt der Lebensforschung" was some sort of official honorary title. As far as I see, the only source for this title is an article in the "Salzburger Landeszeitung" (in those times, an Austrian national socialist's newspaper; not to be confused with a modern-day government gazette holding the same name) by Eduard Paul ...


12

Prince Metternich is reputed to have said, "The Balkans begin at the Rennweg". The Rennweg is a street that led southwest out of the Austrian capital, Vienna. It runs through modern Vienna's third district, Landstraße. Another variant of the supposed quote is, "Asia begins at the Landstrasse".


11

Retrospectively, the only answer to your question is: "because of poor grasp of the local political and cultural context". In the 1920s, dominant countries were organized on the notion of nation state. This was a relatively recent development; for instance, Germany had formally existed only for 50 years or so at that time. Other countries had turned into ...


11

@Relaxed is right to point out that Germany was unified under Prussian, not Austrian hegemony. Prussia’s 1866 military victory over Austria at Koeniggraetz definitively shut out the Austrians. Subsequently, the 1870 war between Prussia and France, with many of the remaining German states outside Austria joining in, led to William I of Prussian being ...


11

Comparing both autopsies archived officially at (AT-OeStA/HHStA UR FUK 2790, 2791 Title: Zwei nach dem Ableben der Kaiserin und Königin Elisabeth aufgenommene legalisierte Protokolle über die stattgehabte Leichenschau und Autopsie (Obduktion) (1898.09.12)) reveals that they are consisting of more pages than are visible in the picture above. Both went ...


10

I believe it is ultimately inherited from the colors of the holy roman empire.


9

As a bride, Marie Antoniette might have been disliked by some due to the longstanding conflict between the two dynasties. But in terms of legitimacy, I'm not sure what could be illegitimate about being an Archduchess of Austria. Indeed, I'm not sure how one could ask for a more legitimate bride than a princess of Europe's most prestigious royal house. In ...


9

The road in question, the Rennweg, begins at the Landstrasse in the south center of modern Vienna, at the southern edge of what was then Vienna. When Metternich referred to the "Balkans," he was referring to the non-German speaking part of Austria, variously referred to as the "east" of even as "Asia." This was because it represented the "high water mark" ...


9

No, absolutely not. In the 30's chewing gum in Europe wasn't a common sweet. Chewing gum in public was considered highly impolite, to say the least. People saw it as eating in public, something you normally don't do either. Only chewing gum was far more rude. It was sold in Europe, marketed mainly towards children, but as far as I know not in great ...


8

In that situation and given the presumed social status of your protagonists: impossible! Well, almost impossible and highly frowned upon, socially, but it gets even worse, for all involved. While extramarital sex was never fully controlled by the authorities, not at anytime and not in Vienna, Austria had quite a few laws, similar to German laws that ...


8

In any case there will have been "attempts" to flee. The most intriguing follow up question is then to ask whether any of these attempts would have been successful, or whether all attempts were in vain. For the camps in question, there were attempts, and some of them were successful. The camp Wöllersleben has some incidents recorded: Translation: ...


7

One answer is the battle of Koeniggratz, against Bismarck's Prussia, which Austria-Hungary lost. Bismarck looked for allies in his war against Austria-Hungary, and found a ready "taker" in Italy, who wanted Venezia, and had previously been allied with France (and gotten Lombardy out of the bargain). The Italian participation occupied enough of the Austrian ...


7

Semaphore's hypothesis was right. I found interesting resource which tells us that islands actually had been considered terra nullius till 1926. Until the year 1926 the islands had been considered "Terra Nullius", or other words, "No Man's Land". However, following practices of Canada, the Soviet Union claimed that all land in the sector between ...


7

Because the House of Austria became Counts of Tyrol, and later acquired Vorarlberg. When feudalism gave way to modern states, these territories fused into Austria as we know it today. The thing is, borders are the way they are because of history. You cannot infer geopolitical divisions from only geography, and then act astonished that reality isn't ...


7

tldr; Both were fascist parties fighting for power. Austrofascism was oriented on the Italian fascists, whereas the Nazis were strongly influenced by Hitler's German Nazis. Austrofascism was derived from the conservative parties Christlichsoziale Partei and Landbund. Both more or less favoured Austrian independence from Germany, although the Landbund ...


7

The general verdict expressed in @Jos' answer is absolutely correct. It was not customary for young upper-middle class women to chew gum in public in German-speaking Europe. However, in the given or intended context there might be some additional aspects to consider. Chewing in public was seen as "eating" and that was very highly frowned upon until the ...


6

The apparent reason for the creation of these Slavic "multinational" states was to create states that were strong enough to act as "buffer states" against Austria, Hungary, and Bulgaria (Germany's allies in World War I). Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia and Romania would, in fact go on to form the "Little Entente", with which France later formed an alliance. So ...


6

https://www.scoopnest.com/user/intlspectator/873260921212293120 HISTORY: Mexico was the only country in the world to protest Germany's annexation of Austria in 1938 https://t.co/OKb8R6COmQ "Mexikoplatz (Mexico Square) is a square in the Austrian capital Vienna. It is located in the city's 2nd district, Leopoldstadt, near the banks of the Danube, on the ...


6

This depends on what you mean by protest. Mexico was apparently the only country that protested officially to the League of Nations. The Soviet Union condemned the annexation of Austria, of course, as did the Spanish Republic, and (surprisingly) the Vatican.


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