15

The production of safety belts in Soviet Union was started in Estonian SSR by NPO Norma which still exists. According to AS Norma website: Our connections with the international automotive industry were established in 1973, the year in which Norma started producing safety belts for cars. The obligation of using safety belts (if a car is equipped with ...


13

Most cars actually had left-side steering even before the switch. Most imported cars were from countries with left-side steering. Cars made in Sweden kept this, as people were used to it, and it easier to export the cars. Here is a picture from the day of the switch, with people driving into Stockholm to try driving on the other side. Of the four cars you ...


12

Depending on the measure of success you are willing to allow, some manufacturers made the transition. Admittedly with varying success: The first car was actually build by Chaisen-Bauer, Pferdekutschen, Wilhelm Wimpff & Söhne, upgraded with not an after market but pre-market modification by Gottlieb Daimler of Mercedes Benz heritage. H.H. Babcock ...


10

I wasn't able to find a definitive proof yet, but most likely it was because of the largest taxicab company (associated with both livery service AND manufacturing of taxicabs) that was called "Checker Taxi". The 'Checker', particularly the 1956-82 A8/Marathon, remains the most famous taxi cab vehicle in the United States. The vehicle is comparable to the ...


8

The deadliest road accident not caused by an explosion that I could find took place in Sotouboua, Togo in 1965, where two trucks crashed into a crowd of dancers, killing 125 people. While this is widely reported on many "Deadliest Road Accident" lists (such as this one) the only contemporary source that I could find for it is the 1965 edition of Africa Diary ...


7

To answer your side questions about paucity of information about Soviet industry: having established a superb intelligence network in the West, USSR was understandably paranoid about the symmetric efforts and classified all information about its industry to the degree that no official numbers could ever be trusted. Combine this with приписки and you see that ...


7

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the first use of the word "van" in print to refer to "A covered vehicle chiefly employed for the conveyance of goods" was in 1829. These were not motor vehicles as we think of vans today, just horse-drawn wagons. See the Wikipedia page for Pantechnicon van for information and a photo of a particular type of English ...


5

The seat belts appeared in the Soviet Union in the 1970s, first without enforcing laws, and shortly after the laws were introduced. I do not remember the year when this happened but some time in the late 1970s or early 80s.


4

This isn't a complete answer, but may help. An alternate line of attack is to look at the history and etimology of the word 'Valet' itself. I can't vouch for the reliability of the source, but etymonline.com drops these suggestive titbits: Modern sense is usually short for valet de chambre; the general sense of "male household servant of the meaner sort" ...


4

The transition was indeed slow: Cars were very unreliable and infrastructure did not exist for large numbers of cars for a long time. This is not just roads but also service stations, etc. Horses were used up to and including WW2 definitely in Poland but possibly also in the USA armed forces. Old horses were processed for things like glue and their meat was ...


3

In the WWII, the basis of logistic (Wehrmacht and Red Army) was a horse. The infantry company (Wehrmacht / RKKA) had one wagon with one horse for supplying ammunition. At a higher level of supply (battalion, regiment, division), the Wehrmacht and the Red Army used trucks. During major offensives, the supply route stretched out up to 100 kilometers. However, ...


3

Working Class People, including his assembly line workers. The cost of the car had dropped from $850 - $340 from 1908 - 1920's. 1920's Ford introduced easily obtainable financing with an installment payment plans. In 1914, Henry Ford announced that it would pay workers a minimum wage of $5 a day. This was more than double the average for the automobile ...


3

Absent further clarification in the question, we might first have to differentiate between: 1. the first car with an electric lighter ("installed/wired in"?), 2. with such a lighter as standard equipment, 3. with a lighter executed as a "receptacle", 4. with a lighter receptacle standardised? The cases 1 and 2 might result completely different results ...


2

Single real road accident of a vehicle(truck) which caused highest deaths was near nagbavji in desuri ki nal Rajsthan in India on 8 sept 2007.This truck was carrying 150 pilgrimage to Ramdevji temple.In this accident truck plunged into 84 feet deep george.84 people died onthe spot.64 injured. In other high casualties of road accidents it is due to fire or ...


2

According to the National Safety Council, the worst single auto accident in U.S. history occurred on July 31, 1954 when 11 people died in a single car crash on Pine Mountain, eight miles south of Whitesburg, KY. There were 12 people in the vehicle, only one survived. The victims included three adults, a teenage girl and seven small children. Thomas Brown had ...


2

The rural population was indeed a significant source of demand for cars. From 1911 to 1920 the number of automobiles owned by farmers increased 21 times, while overall registrations increased 13 times. By 1920, more than a quarter of cars were owned by farmers. Rural doctors were also heavy buyers of cars, as they could serve a wider area, respond to calls ...


2

In most areas transition was indeed gradual. They just stopped breeding them in large numbers. However there is one exception. Military horses. Main transition happened during WWI, and after the war many millions of war horses were slaughtered. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horses_in_World_War_I http://grey-mare.co.uk/articles/general-interest/real-war-...


1

Soviet Union: On 22nd June 1941, the Red Army had around 270,000 trucks, and received another 745,000 during the war. Out of these, 150,000 were new domestic production, 221,500 trucks drafted from the industry and agriculture sectors, 60,600 captured enemy's trucks and 312,600 lend-lease trucks. The average lift capacity of a Soviet truck was 2 tonnes, ...


1

There is also the 1955 Le Mans disaster. 83 spectators were killed and 180 injured when the Mercedes 300 SLR of Pierre Levegh flew out of control near the pits, and major parts of the Mercedes like the engine and rear axle, sliced into a large crowd that had gathered near the pits. A good deal of the fatalities resulted from poor crowd control... allowing ...


1

In the US, a truck filled with migrant workers ran off the road, hit a tree, and burst into flames in Phoenix, Arizona, in about 1960. 21 people were killed. At that time it was the worst 1-vehicle accident in the history of the history of the US, and well might still be.


1

As gleaned from my research, it seems that the road accident with the highest death toll in history was the Salang Tunnel fire, having occurred on November 3rd, 1982. Here is the link for the Wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salang_tunnel_fire. If the Soviet bulletin is to be believed (giving the one who posed the initial question the ...


1

In the United State, the Checker Taxi company of Chicago was established in 1917. The company used Commonwealth Mogul purpose built taxicabs built by Commonwealth Motors of Chicago. Markin Auto Body was the body supplier for the Mogul taxicabs. By 1922 Markin took over Commonwealth Motor, and changed the name to Checker Cab Manufacturing company. Markin ...


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