10

Except during periods of War or high tension, overland travel via India between the 2 wings was possible. However, after the introduction of a visa and passport requirement in 1952, this became much more expensive and time consuming for most people. Prior to 1955, Pakistanis found travel through India more expensive than it should have been because Pakistan ...


5

East Pakistan had population of majority whose mother was Bangla which is close to Sanskrit Western Pakistan was forcing Urdu on to Bengali people in East Pakistan which would mean demeaning there own language and culture, which was not acceptable by many in East Pakistan. Hindi is not National language of India there is no definition of National language ...


2

This article does not paint entire truth. Urdu is not native to West Pakistan. Urdu is native to modern day northern India and the Deccan valley. Urdu also had its fair share of speakers in East Pakistan. Hindi did face opposition in India especially in the southern states, most significantly modern day Tamil Nadu.


1

Yes, it was possible. There were two entry exit points on West Pakistan India border, one is still active Wagha in Punjab and probably Munabao in Rajasthan. However, because of well connected Rail and Bus service Wagha border check point was/is most preferred. It is learned that there was no problem in civilian movement (though always under Indian scrutiny), ...


1

I think the question totally glosses over the fact that "East Pakistan" was created out of the partition of Bengal. The people were all Bengali speaking people. It is only natural that they would not accept the imposition of an "external" and foreign language. While the basis of division of districts and subsequent migrations to and from the 2 Bengals were ...


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