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14

Bavaria joined Prussia after the Franco-Prussian War. Prussia had emerged as the state that could defend "German" interests by leading the Germans in the defeat of France. Earlier, Prussia had beaten Austria in the Seven Weeks War of 1866. Austria had to settle accounts with Hungary after the 1866 war (after having quashed that country's bid for ...


10

Update Here is a 1931 overview map of Bavaria (click on the link Zur historischen Karte im DigiTool-Viewer) appearing to show the municipal (ie gemeinden) divisions, labelled as Bezirksamtsgr(enze). Your required time-frame is uncertain, so I am not sure if that is early enough for your need. Translations: Landesgrenze => national borders Kreisgrenze => ...


8

There were two Roman provinces that encompassed part of modern Bavaria: Raetia and Noricum. In both the ancient population primarily were herders and loggers, not farmers. So they weren't particularly populous provinces. Both were essentially overrun by Germanics during the Migration period. These "Germanics" were primarily speaking either West Germanic ...


7

Because the House of Austria became Counts of Tyrol, and later acquired Vorarlberg. When feudalism gave way to modern states, these territories fused into Austria as we know it today. The thing is, borders are the way they are because of history. You cannot infer geopolitical divisions from only geography, and then act astonished that reality isn't ...


7

I think the question comes from misinterpretation of the expression "Romans abandoned". This was not related to any substantial movement of population. This only means that the Roman army (as an organized force) abandoned the defense and law enforcement in certain place. Population remained the same, part of it "Romanized", others not. The army itself ...


2

Catholicism, whose liturgical language is Latin, is prevalent in Bavaria, so as long as there have been priests and parishioners there, Bavaria has had a population of Latin speakers, for example in the Seminarium Internationale Sancti Petri.


2

National borders are not defined by geography. They are not even defined by ethnic and cultural boundaries. If that was the case, we probably would have much less wars ongoing. National borders are defined by politics and history. In case of Tirol (Tyrol) and Vorarlberg, the whole Tirolean region (larger than what is today Tirol and Vorarlberg) belonged a ...


2

First of all there are more than 1000 years of history you have to know and then you understand maybe a small part :-). But let`s begin. The roots for the house Habsburg are in Switzerland. The rise and fall of the empire especially the House Habsburg is well known, otherwise use the link for further reading. The answer why Vorarlberg is not part of ...


1

For a project like this you might want to consider that just the list of all those Gemeinden fills a book with more than 300 pages: Friedrich Zahn: "Gemeinde-Verzeichnis für das Königreich Bayern nach der Volkszählung vom 1. Dezember 1910 und dem Gebietsstand vom 1. Juni 1911", Lindauer: München, 1911. 380 pages Bavaria is quite big and now has 2056 ...


1

At least for half of your time frame since (from mid of the 3rd century) it were the Alemanni see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alemanni Before maybe the Suebi see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suebi


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