25

The initial decision to divide Berlin into sectors was made around the 12th of September 1944 by the European Advisory Commission (EAC). E.A.C. (44) 9th Meeting Berlin Area (as shown on the annexed map "B") The Berlin area (by which expression is understood the territory of "Greater Berlin" as defined by the law of the 27th April 1920) ...


25

how did it stay competitive with West Germany, which would be free of West Berlin's particular logistical challenges? Or were they being directly subsidized by the Federal Republic and/or the western allies, for political reasons? Yes. There was a Berlinförderungsgesetz (Law of Promotion of Berlin). Daher entschied sich die Bundesregierung, die ...


18

As the documents establishing (internal organization of) the BASC and the initial flight rules show, these were "mini-agreements" signed within the framework of the Allied Control Council and its specialist sub-committees like the Committee on Aviation of the Air Directorate. I haven't found a detailed secondary narrative of these negotiations (...


16

That can mean two different things: A call to relocate the parliament seat from provisional Bonn to the old capital: like it was done after 1990. Small problem with that: The Reichstag was in ruins. So, did they want to build a new house of parliament as well? Likely not in this context. West-Berlin was just a Bundesland, not the capital, and the allies ...


13

In short: Political compromise based on economic and primarily logistical considerations slowly solidified over the initially symbolic and political reasons. Kliment Voroshilov formed the crucial ideas and formulated the argument for the Soviet side. An idea the other two western allies accepted, initially for a short period of time: follow pre-existing ...


11

I think you need to know some background information concerning the division of Germany. There was one Germany, the Deutsches Reich. The Allies defeated it and divided it into four parts: the British, French and Americans in the West and the Soviets in the East. It was soon apparent that after the party more and more rifts were opening. What to do with the ...


9

This is a call for solidarity after the building of the Wall in Berlin. In the 1950's the Bundestag met in Berlin, expressing the political will, that Berlin (West) was a part of the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany). After the Khrushchev's Berlin ultimatum of the 27th of November 1958 this was discontinued. The shown signs Bundestag nach BERLIN are ...


8

In particular, why didn't the Soviets refuse to allow air corridors? "Refusing to allow" would have required the Soviets to enforce that refusal. In other words, having just completed a war with Germany, it would have directly caused a further war with Britain and the US. As good as the Soviet air force were, even a conflict restricted to air ...


8

It has to be this picture, or better scene (video clip), from Wings of Desire: DER HIMMEL ÜBER BERLIN, brd, frankreich 1987 But then we have a certain problem: Filming took place at actual locations in West Berlin, such as Hans Scharoun's Berlin State Library, though the Wall was recreated in studio, due to shooting the true Wall being outlawed. ...


6

the main benefit was not getting the government arrested and replaced by others who were more likely to do as they were told by the USSR. The GDR government was under a lot of pressure from Moscow to "do something" about the flood of their citizens fleeing to the west. That flood of refugees, most of them the brightest and best educated of the country, was ...


5

Note that food was rationed at that time, not generally bought. Wikipedia says, emphasis mine: In response, starting on 1 August, the Soviets offered free food to anyone who crossed into East Berlin and registered their ration cards there, but West Berliners overwhelmingly rejected Soviet offers of food. So, yes you could get your food in East Berlin, ...


5

During the Conference Between Marshal Zhukov and Soviet Representatives, General Clay and US Representatives, General Weeks and British Representatives at Marshal Zhukov’s Headquarters on June 29, 1945, the topic of air corridors were briefly mentioned (mostly in context together with road and railway connections through the Soviet Zone): Marshal Zhukov ...


4

I found some news reports from the 1970s saying that the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) had evidence that heroin was being smuggled into West Berlin, and that the smuggling was being done with the knowledge of the East Germans. The Senate investigation was prompted by reports that the heroin was being targeted at US military personnel in Germany. ...


4

The Berlin Wall was brought down in 1989. Before, the GDR (eastern part of Germany) had been a communist satellite state and when it collapsed, it was almost bankrupt. Both German states reunified. Unified Germany poured nearly 2 Trillion € into the reconstruction of it's eastern states. 25 years later, there is still a difference between the former FRG ...


2

Other answers have provided official historical documents related to the question. Yet nowhere is the rationale stated of how the boundaries were decided. I will offer a chain of reasoning instead , which may shed some light. We start with the assumption that a region is divided between opposing parties. This directly means that maximum possible separation (...


2

The London Protocol in September 1944 established the occupation zone boundaries which later became the East—West German border and the West Berlin periphery. However, it was not until the early days of July 1945 that those boundaries were actually implemented on the ground. Until then all of Berlin was in the hands of the Soviets, while substantial areas of ...


2

After World War II, four allied powers divided Germany into four occupation zones. The American, British, and French zones became the Federal Republic of Germany (BRD/FRG, West Germany) and the Soviet zone became the German Democratic Republic (DDR/GDR, East Germany). Berlin had a special status, and it was itself divided into four sectors. The three western ...


2

After WW2, the German currency (The Reichsmark) took a large hit in value, both due to losing the war, and the Soviets continuing to print RMs (precisely to prevent the economic recovery of Germany). The Western Governments, to facilitate the recovery of (Western) Germany introduced the Deutsche Mark (DM), which the Soviets disapproved of, banning the use of ...


2

West Berlin wasn't just shut off to the Allies, it was under total blockade. Quoting from the relevant Wikipedia article: On 24 June, the Soviets severed land and water connections between the non-Soviet zones and Berlin.[34] That same day, they halted all rail and barge traffic in and out of Berlin.[34] On 25 June, the Soviets stopped supplying ...


2

Your question is legitimate and in fact the unique state of West-Berlin had much influence what would happen in the Future. The city was depopulating. Berlin lost nearly half a million people from 1957 to 1984. The special status of the West Allies meant that conscription was not allowed in West-Berlin. This meant many, many young people who had no ...


1

There is a jumble of minor and not so minor differences. In addition to the income difference mentioned by nvoigt, there is a difference in pensions. A larger fraction of power comes from lignite. Two of three major regions are in the east, one is in the west. Different voting patterns leading to different economic policies. Die Linke, a leftist party ...


1

The last known escape at a crossing point was actually at this checkpoint on the 18th August 1989. 2 persons hid inside the trunk of an Allied vehicle. There was also specific crossing points where only West Germans could cross over. Bahnhof Friedrichstraße could be used by all, other than Allied personel. Allied personel were only allowed to use ...


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