Hot answers tagged

102

The hexagram is not an exclusively Jewish symbol. For that matter, the Star of David as a symbol of Judaism (as opposed to a symbol used by Jews) is far newer than people realize, dating only to 1897 and the First Zionist Congress. Given that, seeing a six-pointed star on top of a Christmas tree in 1924 is no surprise. Also, Jesus was of the house of ...


35

The French Postal Service started operation in the fifteenth century and by 1632 - 150 years before your inquiry - there was already a network of over 623 coaching inns operated by it across the length and breadth of France - typically about seven miles apart. These coaching inns provided refreshment, accommodation and fresh teams for all travelers, not just ...


23

I agree with Kobunite, but by a different route. I can't make out the cap badge well enough to identify it positively, but the collar badges are either Royal Artillery or Royal Engineers, which are quite similar. The cap badge definitely isn't Royal Artillery, which looks like this: So he's Royal Engineers. The uniform is that of a commissioned officer: the ...


11

Among the best primary sources for this are Institutio Oratoria by Quintilian (c.35 to c.100 BC) and Dialogus de oratoribus, usually attributed to Tacitus (c.56 to c.100). Both of these are cited extensively by Stanley Bonner in Education in Ancient Rome: From the Elder Cato to the Younger Pliny. It should be noted, though, that the liberal education ...


11

Starting with the regiment - looking at the cap badge (see below), I believe that he was in the Corps of Royal Engineers. The uniform appears to be that of a commissioned officer, however the exact rank will be difficult as the British Army wears rank insignia on the shoulder boards and sleeves.


11

Post stages existed in France (and elsewhere in Europe) before the Revolution where horses would be exchanged along the route The Wikipedia article Stage station deals more about the 19th century than the 18th century, but otherwise gives a good overview on how the system worked. It also explains the Origin of the name posting: Medieval couriers were ...


11

No idea if the story occurred exactly as described, but FWIW it is plausible. Louis XVI sought to flee his plight during the French Revolution a few years later. A number of things went wrong after he left with his family during the night: he opted for a slow, heavy coach instead of the two light ones that had been recommended to him so the family wouldn't ...


11

The tradition is both older and newer than this. As an example, in 1602 Samuel Rowlands produced a pamphlet poem Tis Merrie when Gossips meete, which included the verse Well wot you Besse, to whom Ile drinke too now, Sure as I liue, vnto your sister Sisse, And to the Youth that did the Angell bow. And sent it for a token : trueth halfe ...


8

These "North Saxons" were exactly there where you would expect them, in the North of England — or were they? In any case, naming a region with a string of letters that somehow stuck was anything between 'just not important' to 'not really fitting anyways'. For some breadcrumbs: Annals of Ulster (Vol. I, ed. W. M. Hennessy, 1887), sub anno 912 alias 913: ...


8

According to this article in the British Art Journal from 2014: [Lily] married John Boyden Barrett in 1898 and, probably because her husband did not approve, her modelling career ended. For two decades she appears to have lived a comfortable, married life, living in rented houses in various parts of London with her husband. Thereafter, her ...


6

For a detailed account, see Syndney Mintz's classic book Sweetness and Power, especially the chapter "Consumption". On p. 149 he mentions that by 1900, sugar "was contributing on average nearly one-sixth of per-capita caloric intake" for England as a whole, and that the portion would have been significantly higher for working-class women and children. You ...


5

An Ancestry study has this to say (slightly reformatted for readability): This is according to new analysis of the genetic history of two million people worldwide by Ancestry, the leader in family history and consumer genomics, based on data collated from the AncestryDNA home DNA test that examines a person’s entire genome at over 700,000 ...


5

It seems unlikely. Especially with the commoners, it's hard to know for sure because "the rebels do not represent themselves for the written record." (source) I don't see any evidence that English peasants were aware of events on the continent in any way at all, nor that the elites followed this sort of thing. However, this is not to say that the two ...


4

By 1939 around 100 permanent airfields had been constructed. Year Military Licensed Civil 1935 60 90 1940 280 0 1945 720 1950 270 90 1955 210 105 1960 130 115 According to the Aeroplane Directory, in 1945 the UK contained 720 operational service airfields (including flying-boat bases), occupying in total ...


4

The bocage country of Normandy, which the British were just entering subsequent to Operation Jupiter, made offensive action much more difficult. Up to July 2 the British forces were operating almost exclusively in bocage-free Nort-East Normandy. Normandy Bocage Marked up manually from Maps #55, #63, #64, and #65 of the West Point Military Atlas - WW2 ...


4

It's called the substitution effect in economics. Eggs are fundamentally cheaper than other forms of protein such as meat or fish. When shortages of "high end" proteins cause their prices to rise, people "trade down" to eggs. The prices of eggs rise less in absolute terms than those of the other proteins. But eggs rise more in percentage terms (from a ...


3

The Defence of Cyprus in 1941 Taking into account the other answers and comments, I'll limit this to filling in a couple of the gaps. Naval Forces I agree with the comment that the British Mediterranean Fleet based at Alexandria was the primary naval force responsible for defending Cyprus. Air Forces I also agree with the comment that few planes were ...


2

I would agree with Royal Engineers. The lapel badge of the Royal Fusiliers, although similar to the RE, is more "splayed - eg !


1

When you are roughed up by a bunch of hooligans you don't worry too much about their (lack of) sense of fashion. You have more urgent problems. Hitler was somewhat lucky when his people found a load of tropical uniforms in a dump store for a bargain price. That's why the brown shirts wore brown shirts. Only much later was he able to afford to have Hugo ...


1

Question: How did American colonial rights and conditions compare to those within the British Isles? Did most American colonists have it better or worse than most British (England, Scotland, Wales, Ireland) before the revolution in the 1750s? Short Answer Better in some ways. The colonials in the 1750's were able to ...


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