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101

The hexagram is not an exclusively Jewish symbol. For that matter, the Star of David as a symbol of Judaism (as opposed to a symbol used by Jews) is far newer than people realize, dating only to 1897 and the First Zionist Congress. Given that, seeing a six-pointed star on top of a Christmas tree in 1924 is no surprise. Also, Jesus was of the house of ...


40

The news reached London on the 10th of August. It was, of course, known by British officials in the colonies much earlier, but It is astonishing how casually the Declaration was first reported to official London. On July 8 ex-Governor Tryon in New York wrote to Lord George Germain, the colonial secretary, and Admiral Shuldham wrote to the Admiralty ...


29

This would appear to be the badge of the No. 300 Polish Bomber Squadron which fought alongside the Royal Air Force and operated from airfields in the United Kingdom. Above: Badge with colour. Source: Wikipedia. Below, badge (no colouring) on memorial plaque. Source: Aircrew Remembered The CCC is 300 in Roman numerals and the badge combines the ...


26

Not repeating info in the other answer(s), but it should be realized that by the time the Declaration of Independence was written, the Battles of Lexington and Concord were already more than a year old (April 19, 1775), as was the Colonials' Continental Army (June 1775). Parliament in London by this time was already quite certain they had an organized ...


16

The Imperial War Museum, in association with the publisher J.B. Hayward, has published a series of volumes listing all British & Commonwealth POWs held in Germany and German Occupied Territories. volume 1: Prisoners of War. The British army 1939 --1945 volume 2: Prisoners of war naval and air forces of Great Britain and the empire 1939-1945 volume 3: ...


12

This question should probably be in the Myth & Folklore SE but let's answer it anyway. King Arthur is such a major figure in Brittany because Brittany was largely settled by Britons towards the end of the 4th Century and into the 6th Century. The reasons for this vary by time period, in the earlier wave sources state that Britons were sent to the ...


8

T.E.D. is right here. It is mentioned that Jorrocks "trotted home". A "trot" is a type of horse gait. Therefore, Jorrocks is most likely a horse, and presumably Street was the owner of Jorrocks. Jorrocks is actually a somewhat famous horse name (the name of a famous racing horse), so it makes sense as a horse name (though the original would have been long ...


7

I've not seen any documentation for this particular circumstance, however, sailing 'up' the channel (as the Spanish Armada had discovered) was risky, not least because of the bad weather that was present as the dispatches arrived on the English coast. The vessels (HMS Pickle and HMS Entreprenante) that were given the dispatches were small and relatively ...


5

This got to be a bit long for comments, so I'm moving the content here. farmers sent away their hunters to be trained for harness work. Many riding horses took badly to this humble duty, but Street’s Jorrocks trotted home like a gentleman. This is presumably simply a real-world example of a farmer and his horse, of the type he's talking about. In ...


5

This blog on mince pies from the organisation English Heritage contains the following passage. Our mince pies undoubtedly have medieval origins, although we would not immediately recognise them. Pie crusts were known as coffins, and used as a vessel to cook delicate foods or house pre-boiled meat fillings. Pastry was little more than flour mixed with ...


5

Question: In early WW2, how much of the merchant marine was American? Short Answer: Sept 1939, The United States had 19% of the merchant ships and 27% of the tonnage relative to the British Empire, US, and France. Detailed Answer For the purposes of this question WWII started in Europe, Sept 1939 when Germany invaded ...


5

The names and dates of these archaeological periods can be contested, but as a preliminary, we are concerned here with the: Nordic Bronze Age (c. 1700 BCE - c. 500 BCE) Pre-Roman Iron Age (c. 500 BCE - c. 1 BCE) Roman Iron Age in northern Europe (c. 1 CE – 400 CE) Germanic Iron Age / Early Christian Ireland (c. 400 – 800 CE) Kerry L's suggestion of ...


4

Near Thetford in Norfolk, there is a place called Thetford Warren. The remains of Thetford Warren Lodge is still standing, and is managed by English Heritage. The lodge was used by the warren keeper. There is a write-up on their website: https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/thetford-warren-lodge/history/rabbits-warreners/ The following quote ...


3

In the late 1930s, Britain organized the 1st Anti-Aircraft (AA) division. Armed with over 100 anti aircraft guns, it reported to the Fighter Command, and its mission was to defend London against air attack, which did during the Blitz, and at other times. In the early 1940s, it was expanded to defend large parts of Southeast England.


3

According to: http://armed-guard.com/about-mm.html Prior to the beginning of World War II there about 55,000 civilian sailors employed in the U.S. merchant marine. This number increased to as many as 250,000 men who served in the U.S. merchant marine by the end of the war. A pre-war merchant fleet of 1,340 cargo ships and tankers expanded to at least 4,...


3

Producing eggs on a large scale requires feeding your hens grain. I deduce that the shortage of shipping space meant that priority would have been given to grain for human consumption, so the price of chicken food would rise. Since eggs weren't rationed during WWI, but meat was, demand for eggs would rise. With production costs and demand both rising, eggs ...


3

I believe you are referring to a pasty. This pie with a savory filling has been popular in England for centuries, but the method you describe of eating it and throwing away the crust is often associated with tin miners in Cornwall. The pasty was a convenient, sealed way for miners to carry a meal with them. It is alleged that the pasty was a way for them to ...


2

I'm not sure whether a list has been compiled and published, but it should be possible to extract the information (at least for air crew) from the Operational Records of 300 Squadron. These have been digitised, and can be accessed from the website of the UK National Archives. However, note that these records are not free to download. An alternative may ...


2

'Street' in this case is the English farmer, writer and broadcaster A. G. Street, 'Jorrocks' was his horse, and the anecdotes are taken from Street's book From Dusk Until Dawn, published in 1945. This online edition of Hastings' book has a different version of that paragraph: "Wiltshire farmer Arthur Street ploughed up his grassland as the government ...


2

British pacifism and anti-militarism was just a fad When we talk about British pacifist and anti-militarist tradition, it largely revolves around Peace Society and people like Robert Spence Watson, John Scott etc ... People like these were usually well respected and known in their professions (scholars, religious figures, businessmen ...) but they had ...


1

This depends on when you think King Arthur existed. The Bretons moved to France at some time between the fifth and tenth centuries from southern Britain. This is why Britain and Brittany are similar words (identical in French, distinguished only by calling Britain "Great Britain"). They took their language, social structure, folklore, placenames (e.g. there ...


1

There was also the Cyprus Regiment, mostly recruited locally, and whilst quite a large part fought well across the Med Theatre, there must have been an element that was involved in the defence of Cyprus. This might be a further area for your research.


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