44

I suppose that the Neolithic Silbury Hill in Wiltshire, built about 2470 - 2350 BC, is probably a contender for any list of the tallest European structures from ancient times. At 39.3 metres (129 ft) high, I'm pretty sure it is the tallest prehistoric structure in Europe. Photo by Greg O'Beirne, CC BY-SA 3.0, unchanged


40

I'll put in the Hagia Sophia, which reached the height of 182ft (55.6 meters) in the year 562: ...The emperor ordered an immediate restoration. He entrusted it to Isidorus the Younger, nephew of Isidore of Miletus, who used lighter materials and elevated the dome by "30 feet"[18] (about 6.25 meters or 20.5 feet)[clarification needed] – giving the ...


30

It's a "single pot lime kiln", adjacent to the beach, at Wallog. Coal and limestone would have been landed on the beach from small sailing vessels. The burnt lime would then be used to improve the local acidic soils. There are a number of these kilns in Ceredigion. This particular kiln dates to the early nineteenth century, and is described by Cadw as "a ...


28

Possible currently existing candidates after the Colosseum and the Nimes Aqueduct. at 91 feet, the aqueduct of Ferreres, tarragona, Ic B.C. at 89 feet, the aqueduct of Segovia. The Hercules lighttower, Galicia. 118 feet of roman building, 72 more feet added in the 1600's during a rebuild process. a "detailed" plan of the roman stone structure ( no ...


19

Borsippa was a city that was closely connected to Babylon. It had a Ziggurat built by Nebbuchadnezzar II, on the site of an older building. It belonged to the god Nabu. Originally standing at 70 meters, the remains of the ziggurat are now 52 meters tall. Medieval people thought that it was the tower of Babel. Its known as the "the tongue tower" because of ...


18

What about the Pantheon in Rome, finished circa 126 AD? It is 142 feet to the inside of its oculus, and the dome adds another 1.2 metres (3.9 ft). (shared from engineeringrome.com via CC 3.0, attibuted to Lancaster, 2005). Not only that, it is still is the world's largest unreinforced concrete dome, and the only one surviving from the time of the Empire.


18

If you look at the details of the oldest buildings on your list, all of them are built from fieldstone or minimally-shaped quarried stone. Further, the building materials were either found on-site or transported a relatively short distance. Most of the Fertile Crescent, and particularly Mesopotamia, does not have access to these building materials. ...


14

Actually, some of the oldest known man-made structures are in the Fertile Crescent (FC). The list in your question purposefully excludes sites like Göbekli Tepe, Tell es-Sultan, and Tell Qaramel, each in the FC, on the basis that they're not "recognizable standing buildings". As such there's inherent bias in the source you cite to exclude sites that have ...


12

Looks pretty much like the Bibliotheca Alexandrina? The historical predecessor was the Library of Alexandria: Established Probably during the reign of Ptolemy II Philadelphus (285–246 BC) And the modern building Bibliotheca Alexandrina: 16 October 2002; 16 years ago Viewed from Google Earth:


11

Florence, Milan, Venice, and Genoa were the most important city-states of Renaissance Italy. This distinction is the chief attribute shared by these four cities. Of course, that's a bit of an intrinsically subjective statement. There were several major players, and it is difficult to quantify something as nebulous as "importance". Nontheless this particular ...


11

It appears that both are correct. It's just that they are referring to different buildings. The term Moti Masjid simply means "Pearl Mosque". The Moti Masjid (Agra Fort) "Pearl Mosque" in Agra was built by the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan in the 17th century. Image source - Wikimedia The Moti Masjid (Lahore Fort) "Pearl Mosque" inside the Lahore Fort was ...


11

No, wheels are not older than walls. Walls (as in city walls, designed to protect a group of people) have been discovered at Jericho, and dated to c 8000 BCE. The earliest walls of any kind that we have found so far are at Göbekli Tepe, and these have been dated to the 9th millennium BCE. The earliest wheel that we have found was discovered in the city of ...


10

Julius Caesar is alleged to have completed a 25 mile double circumvallation (11 miles inner, 14 miles outer) of Alesia in 30 days, with approximately 50,000 men - though at all times, of course, some of those had to be on guard duty. This circumvallation would have been a 8 foot or so ditch in front of a similar mound, on which a 12-15 foot wooden wall was ...


9

(This is a list question with many possible answers. Mirroring the meta proposal for references I'm making this is a community wiki - please feel free to edit to add more examples.) Wàn Sōng Temple, China - Semaphore Abbey of Monte Cassino, Italy - SJuan76 Reims Cathedral, France - gdir Various actions on the Eastern Front of WWII - Fedor Nazarov Mỹ Sơn ...


9

It's not just Europe but even narrower. You'll notice the top 3 listed are all in France. Of the rest of the top 10, 4 are in the British Isles. I think Mark has about half of the answer: These structures are over 5 thousand years old. Human-made materials have trouble lasting that long, so the very nature of the question privileges areas with lots of ...


8

The use of concrete did fade after the fall of the western Roman Empire, though at least some aspects of the use of concrete was held over into the Byzantine Architectural style, on some early Byzantine works. A web page here shows an excerpt from a book on Architecture, A History of Architecture on the Comparative Method, by Sir Banister-Fletcher, New York, ...


7

Such stippling is a common feature at prehistoric Maltese sites. They are often considered a primitive decorative pattern - somewhat of a forerunner of a modern art form. It is the best preserved of all the Maltese temples ... The two left-hand lobed chambers are linked by a trilith niche of stones decorated by stippling; the inner of these two chambers ...


6

I'm reminded of the Baedeker Raids of WW2. Baron Gustav Braun von Stumm, a spokesman for the German Foreign Office, is reported to have said on 24 April 1942 (following the first attack), "We shall go out and bomb every building in Britain marked with three stars in the Baedeker Guide", a reference to the popular travel guides of that name. ...


6

In September 1914, during the first World War the famous French Reims Cathedral was hit and heavily damaged by German shell fire. Reims Cathedral is a national monument of France, not only because of its long history and architectural beauty, but also because the French kings were crowned there. As far as I know, the German troops undoubtedly aimed for the ...


6

The Monastery of Monte Cassino. Which was made worse by the facts that: even for the attacker, there were no actual reasons for it, as the Germans were (this time) civilized and did not use the monastery as part of their defenses. it worsened the situation of the attacker. Once bombed, there was no cultural reason to declare the ruins "safe ground", and so ...


6

Because there was no need to. During the English Civil War, the old Wardour Castle was besieged and largely blown up by the 3rd Baron Arundell. This is not readily apparent from the Wikipedia article, which depicts this photo: (Photo by Simon Burchell CC BY_SA 3.0) Well, that seems formidable enough. However - if you walk around the castle, you'll see this:...


6

Did you ever hear of a tell? In archaeology a tell is an artificial hill formed by generation after generation, century after century, of people living in the same place. A tell is an artificial hill created by many generations of people living and rebuilding on the same spot. Over time, the level rises, forming a mound.[9] The single biggest contributor ...


6

It was probably the one in Gode. More properly called a villa than a palace. But the locals referred to it as "palace" as it was still the biggest building for hundreds of kilometers around. Although some even did called that building Selassie's "Winter palace". On 13 July 1977 Carl Gustaf von Rosen died in this 'palace' when the WSLF under Abdullahi ...


5

There is evidence of villas in use well after 600AD, When the Pope sent missionaries to Britain between 580 - 640AD, They reported of well organised and well run towns, the people enjoying bath houses, fine food, and many buildings from Roman times still in use, They reported staying in Villas with fine mosaics, during their mission, and a well run and ...


5

According to Wikipedia, what was the Cobo Arena is now the Grand Riverview Ballroom which is the round building on the right of the google maps image. It's a separate building from the Joe Louis Arena (which is on the left, as marked).


5

Civilisations not only build buildings, but destroy and reuse them. Many ruins were effectively used as quarries by local people and stones, e.g. bricks from Roman buildings ended up in an early medieval church, then in a late medieval fortress, then in a noble home (see here, only in Hungarian). Wikipedia also mentions how roman bricks were reused. I ...


4

You observed correctly. The Second Temple was built upon Temple Mount. Around 20 B.C., King Herod the Great lavishly renovated the site, and in the process endowed the hill with a retaining wall. This structure became the only remnants of the Second Temple after its destruction in A.D. 70, most famously in the form of the Wailing Wall. In fact, however, ...


4

Let's create a timeline: The Haskell Free Library was "spaded" in 1901 and completed in 1904. It was deliberately built across the border in order to foster better U.S. Canadian relations. Although the entrance was placed on the U.S. side, Canadians can now go to and from the Canadian border and that entrance without passports or any border controls. The ...


4

During the Soviet German war (part of the WWII) both sides deliberately destroyed cultural monuments of the other side. The Germans tried to destroy the Uspenskii cathedral, a part of the Kiev Lavra. I only have a Russian language source for this, but there are some photos: http://2000.net.ua/2000/aspekty/istorija/44243 The document mentions names and ...


4

The Temple Mount in Jerusalem From http://www.jerusalem-insiders-guide.com/temple-of-jerusalem.html The dimensions for the Temple of Jerusalem were staggering: 460 meters to the east, 315 m to the north, 280 m to the south, and the western wall was 485 meters long. The walls above ground rose 30 meters (ten stories tall), and their foundations were as ...


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