18

If you look at the details of the oldest buildings on your list, all of them are built from fieldstone or minimally-shaped quarried stone. Further, the building materials were either found on-site or transported a relatively short distance. Most of the Fertile Crescent, and particularly Mesopotamia, does not have access to these building materials. ...


14

Actually, some of the oldest known man-made structures are in the Fertile Crescent (FC). The list in your question purposefully excludes sites like Göbekli Tepe, Tell es-Sultan, and Tell Qaramel, each in the FC, on the basis that they're not "recognizable standing buildings". As such there's inherent bias in the source you cite to exclude sites that have ...


12

Looks pretty much like the Bibliotheca Alexandrina? The historical predecessor was the Library of Alexandria: Established Probably during the reign of Ptolemy II Philadelphus (285–246 BC) And the modern building Bibliotheca Alexandrina: 16 October 2002; 16 years ago Viewed from Google Earth:


11

No, wheels are not older than walls. Walls (as in city walls, designed to protect a group of people) have been discovered at Jericho, and dated to c 8000 BCE. The earliest walls of any kind that we have found so far are at Göbekli Tepe, and these have been dated to the 9th millennium BCE. The earliest wheel that we have found was discovered in the city of ...


9

It's not just Europe but even narrower. You'll notice the top 3 listed are all in France. Of the rest of the top 10, 4 are in the British Isles. I think Mark has about half of the answer: These structures are over 5 thousand years old. Human-made materials have trouble lasting that long, so the very nature of the question privileges areas with lots of ...


6

It was probably the one in Gode. More properly called a villa than a palace. But the locals referred to it as "palace" as it was still the biggest building for hundreds of kilometers around. Although some even did called that building Selassie's "Winter palace". On 13 July 1977 Carl Gustaf von Rosen died in this 'palace' when the WSLF under Abdullahi ...


5

Civilisations not only build buildings, but destroy and reuse them. Many ruins were effectively used as quarries by local people and stones, e.g. bricks from Roman buildings ended up in an early medieval church, then in a late medieval fortress, then in a noble home (see here, only in Hungarian). Wikipedia also mentions how roman bricks were reused. I ...


4

The Tour de Croy was completed in 1765, according to the Chatillon site page Histoire de la ville. Construction took place in stages, starting in 1763. The height was eventually 50 feet in total. It seems to have functioned as an observatory from the start, and it is referred to as la Tour de M. le Duc de Croy on page 61 of Histoire de l'Academie royale des ...


1

Well, I can't provide any specific location information, but following some of the listed sources from the wiki article leads to a page here which does contain a drawing titled Ancient Church of Villers-Bretonneux: There is some more information there, and perhaps someone with better knowledge of French can figure the source of the image out. (note some ...


1

Anyone can learn to do so to a degree. As a teenager watching Dark Shadows (1966-1972) I saw that the fictional Collingwood estate at the fiction town of Collinsport, Maine, had two mansions. The present Collinwood Mansion and the abandoned Old House. In episodes where a character traveled back in time to the 1790s, the newer Collingwood was new built, ...


1

I'm not an architectural historian, although I have an interest in the subject, but I really do not think this is feasible, at least without limiting your area of interest considerably. To take just one vernacular form of architecture, wattle and daub. This is a widespread technique, with many variations in construction, materials and wide geographical ...


1

It could be argued the wheel predates the wall but only technically. The dung beetle wheels their fodder for transport. Any caveman watching a rock rolling down a hill could see a working demonstration of a wheel. The complexity of the wheel was not conceiving of the circle or even the construction. The complexity of the wheel which made it so useful for ...


1

According to LeCount & Strong's San Francisco City Directory for the Year 1854, the U.S. Land Commission met in John Parrott's "Iron Building" at 148 California Street. According to Igler's Industrial Cowboys (2001): ... the four floors of his Iron Building conveniently housed the clerks, archives, and officers of the U.S. Board of Land Claims ...


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