Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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Most people at the time did not think the Roman Empire had fallen -- it's only from five hundred or a thousand years later that we can conclude that it did. Both points of view are reasonable. What happened around 476 is that the Western part of the Roman Empire was lost to central control. This was not the first time it had happened -- consider the Gallic ...


47

The Early Middle Ages were not kind to Rome, and the long destructive war to recapture it didn't help things. By the time the dust settled, Rome had practically ceased to exist as a major city, with population estimates ranging from less than 50,000, to a tenth that* The rest of the peninsula didn't do much better. According to McEvedy and Jones, Italy was ...


43

No, they did not try to move their capital to Rome, but the Emperor Heraclius at one point--around 620 or so when the war against Persia was going very badly--did consider moving the capital even farther west to Carthage (not quite as strange as it sounds since his father had been exarch of Africa and it had been the power base from which he had seized the ...


22

I did not watch the YouTube video, but based on your description, it seems to be presenting a garbled account of history. Constantine XI did not will his titles way, but his brother Thomas Palaiologos claimed the imperial title after his death. Thomas briefly ruled the Byzantine remnants in the Peloponnese, but fled to Italy ahead of an Ottoman invasion in ...


18

John VI Kantakouzenos John VI Kantakouzenos, who reigned from 31 March 1347 to 10 December 1354, is the emperor who comes closest to meeting your criteria. He was deposed by his co-emperor John V Palaiologos (for whom he had earlier acted as regent), adopted the name Joasaph Christodoulos and wrote a History: After he had been forced to retire, Emperor ...


5

SHORT ANSWER: The Roman Empire had many different avatars or incarnations, and thus it fell on many different dates. LONG ANSWER: I do not count the Roman Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, or the Ottoman Empire, the Russian Empire, the French Empire, the German Empire, or the Austrian Empire as any sort of continuation of the Roman Empire. ...


5

This is not answerable with satisfactory comprehensiveness. The time before settlement and adoption of Christianity around 1000 is just too poorly documented. But apart from what Wikipedia presents in Old Hungarian script and some information in History of the Hungarian language, this is probably the secondary source coming most closely to what the question ...


5

Emperor Alexios was the first (out of four) members of the Komnenos Dynasty, who instituted the Komnenos reforms. Because it was (initially) a "faction" of the Byzantine Empire, rather than representatives of the Empire itself, they went back to using their own "native" troops of peasant soldiers, rather than mercenaries. The defeat at Manzikert had made ...


3

Just to complement Geerkens' answer. Portugal had the Order of Christ. Originally the Portuguese Templars, they were incorporated in a new order when the Templars were suppressed. With the end of the reconquista and loss of relevance of the crusades, the Order progressively lost its warrior-monk nature. In the end of the c. XV, its lay members did not have ...


2

the Fall of Constantinople was the most important event that ultimately led to the Age of Exploration, mainly the discovery of the New World by Columbus and of the sea route to India by Vasco da Gama. Maybe ... Maybe not ... Let's see ... On one hand, the European Age of Discovery had already begun over three decades before the aforementioned event even ...


2

It seems to me we have two different descriptive terms for a piece of headgear. The first term, kamelaukion or kalemaukion from Wikipedia: In Byzantine times the term kamelaukion was a more general one for formal headgear, including items worn by the Imperial family. So this term describes a piece of headgear worn by a member of an imperial family. ...


2

What makes you think that the eastern Roman or "Byzantine" army was helpless against cavalry? What makes you think that heavy cavalry and heavy infantry would be useless against enemy cavalry forces? What makes you think that the "Byzantine" army didn't also have light cavalry and light infantry, etc., etc.? Here is a link to an article about "Byzantine" ...


1

No. It did not survive. That is, it seems self-evident that at the source Justinian and his lawyers would have had a single book-shelf filled with the entire collection? But after that it gets complicated and sketchy for quite some time. From its creation until centuries later the number of manuscripts used, compiled, in circulation was indeed quite ...


1

First of all, the Nomos Georgikos is not a set of laws issued at one point in time. This collection resembles much the history of the bible in sofar as the laws have been assemled – and changed, in extent, in content – from 740–14th century. Beginning at Leo III the Isaurian (717–741). Only at that late time it somewhat solidified into a canon-like ...


1

The early centers of Christianity, that is Alexandria, Antioch, and Jerusalem, all sided with the Eastern (Greek Orthodox) Church. Rome did not recognize the position of these cities (except in a subordinate role) and the Orthodox Church did. Rome was the last of the five major cities to become Christian. It was, however, the most powerful, first because it ...


1

The first governor of Greece, Ioannes Kapodistrias, was a descendant if the Comnenus family from his mother, Diamanto Gonemi, a Cypriot family. There are several direct male descendants of the Comnenus family in Cyprus, being the descendants of Andronikos Comnenus and Theodora Comnenus. In several occasions they intermarried with the Lusignian family and so ...


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