New answers tagged

-1

One detail worth mentioning: during its formative period, Constantinople was the premiere center of culture & knowledge, with no serious competition. Rome had declined in size, wealth & importance, & except as the seat of the Pope was of negligible importance. Venice, Paris & London were infant metropoleis, barely of note even within their ...


3

Note: I contributed to a number of articles on the Trebizond Empire for Wikipedia, so while I do not claim to be an expert on this subject, I can speak with some authority on the available scholarship. The etymology of Athenae/Atina/Pazar is uncertain. Some favor a Greek origin -- but fail to provide a convincing rationale to explain it. Some favor a Laz ...


1

In short: probably yes. Prokopios mentions the village only to refute the local tradition that it had been founded by its more famous namesake. Scholars have shared this skepticism and thus largely relegated Pontic Athens to footnotes or condemned it to complete oblivion. But nothing is more plausible than regarding it as a result of Perikles’ expedition to ...


7

From Gibbon's 'Decline and Fall' Chapter 68: From the first hour of the memorable twenty-ninth of May, disorder and rapine prevailed in Constantinople till the eighth hour of the same day, when the sultan himself passed in triumph through the gate of St. Romanus. He was attended by his vizirs, bashaws, and guards, each of whom (says a Byzantine historian) ...


Top 50 recent answers are included