32

Congratulations on your first question, justCal! The cropped version of the Mission Dolores photograph was published in George Robinson Fardon's famous 1856 album. I have the cheap Dover edition. As you found, a larger version also appears in the works of Carleton Watkins. Both men have been credited with this image, but both reprinted the work of another, ...


26

The government has some good resources for research like this site for the Yokut tribe. This map from Berkeley not only outlines each culture but puts them into a super class based on language.


16

Territory Governor Riley, who had summoned the constitutional convention, had 1,000 English and 250 Spanish copied printed "post-haste" and distributed around the state. In addition, many of the convention delegates themselves stood for the election just 4 weeks later, by their campaigning further promulgating news and description of the pending ...


15

Yes: The presidio of Monterey was destroyed by the Argentine-sponsored privateer Hippolyte Bouchard in 1818. The presidio of San Francisco capitulated to the pro-Spanish forces of Joaquin Solís in 1829. The presidio and town of Monterey were occupied by Jones of the USA in 1842.


14

First, to be clear, lead is an additive and doesn't occur naturally in gasoline. It was in 1921 that General Motors discovered that adding lead (in the form of lead tetraethyl or TEL) to gasoline is a cheap way to increase octane and prevent engine knocking. So it would have been possible before that. Soon after, in 1925 and 1926, there was a temporary ban ...


13

Yes, there were. The Russian-American Company sent a party of prospectors comprised of four Russians and six Tlingit indians led by a Lt P.P. Doroshin: Doroshin and 10 RAC employees sailed to California aboard the Prince Menshikov, which arrived in the overnight boom town of San Francisco on December 21, 1848. In January, 1849, Doroshin set out with ...


12

Here's an interesting article on the topic, from the Santa Barbara Independent newspaper. It's titled, "What Did the Early Spanish Settlers Eat?" and should answer your questions: The primary crop was wheat, in addition to significant amounts of corn, beans, barley, and peas. As the mission’s water system developed, more sophisticated irrigation ...


12

It was published at least twice in the newspaper Alta California, on November 1 and November 8. It may have appeared in other newspapers as well, but this was what I was able to find with a quick search.


11

California could not be broken up at the time as it only contained about 90,000 residents and the minimum resident requirement to become a state was at the time 60,000. so to split it up into 3 states you would have to wait till you have 180,000 residents with 60,000 in distinct areas to facilitate a split.


11

The Catacombs of Paris contain the remains of more than 6 million people, and much like the San Francisco situation the catacombs were established to alleviate overflowing cemeteries throughout Paris. These catacombs were built using defunct mines and quarries spread out underneath Paris, and millions of remains were moved there from cemeteries across the ...


11

No. In 1814 a Scotsman by the name of John Cameron jumped ship. He later changed his name to Gilroy. Here's some info from the city of Gilroy California web page. John Cameron was born in a southern district of Inverness-shire, Scotland in 1794. At 19, he left home, hiring aboard a British trading ship which arrived, in 1814, at what was then the Spanish ...


10

Though there may have been logging smaller trees earlier, It appears that the first well documented felling of one of the giant trees may have been in 1853: On Monday, 27 June, 1853, a giant sequoia – one of the natural world's most awe-inspiring sights - was brought to the ground by a band of gold-rush speculators in Calaveras county, California. It ...


9

According to the The San Francisco call., October 10, 1910, pg 3, the park is named after Núñez de Balboa. It states that at the park's dedication... House and Park Praised ...Prof. George Barron, curator of Golden Gate Park museum made a vigorus plea for playgrounds for the mission district. He touched on the great work being done by the improvement ...


8

It was horribly too far away. One thing is stablishing some minor settlements and trade activities, and a very different one is conducting a military expedition. Siberia was not developed to support such an effort locally, and most of the southern coastline of what is now the Russian Far East was part of China (which ceded it to Russia as part of the ...


8

This study, Japanese Wrecks stranded and picked up adrift in the North Pacific Ocean by Charles Wolcott Brooks, presented before the California Academy of Sciences in 1875, published in 1876, lists on page 10 (among dozens of other entries covering many years) what may have been the relevant encounter in 1815 (emphasis mine): Captain Alexander Adams, ...


8

No, that doesn't seem a likely explanation, not after 750 years of reconquista. The answer is for now: we don't know. From Wikipedia: Spanish explorers in the 16th century, when they first discovered the Baja California peninsula west of the Sea of Cortez, at first thought the peninsula to be a large island. The name "California" was applied to the ...


7

According to pg 317 of the Book California Through Russian Eyes, by James R Gibson, ...while hunting sea otters from the Ilmena, he either jumped ship or was captured by a Spanish patrol. The Ilmena is listed as 'purchased from the Americans' on the Russia-America Company wiki page. So there's your ship name, and yes he was employed in the fur trade.


7

As Ben Crowell observed above, while the missions produced grain and legumes, the rancho economy was extremely focused on cattle production. Californios were rich in products made from leather, tallow, and beef. Meat was often wasted after slaughter, left to rot on the bone, or boiled up in tallowmaking. They had so much beef they could have made a great ...


7

This was probably referring to John Mulligan, who is referred to in this discussion of the population at Branciforte, adjacent to the mission of Santa Cruz: The total population of Spanish or mixed blood, known as gente de razon in 1820, was estimated at something over 3,000 souls; and of foreigners not of Spanish or Indian parentage, twelve; of these ...


7

I've done a search of the catalogue of the National Archives for material that might suggest British interest in taking California during the time-frame (1769-1846). [The Discovery search engine allows a centralised search of some '32 million descriptions of records held by The National Archives and more than 2,500 archives across the country']. I can find ...


7

To add to the accepted answer, here is some additional information perhaps indirectly related to the question. This plaque in San Francisco, California Historical Landmark No. 819, includes the phrase "this venture caused wide speculation about British intentions". Part of the background to this may be this letter (page 1 and page 2) that William G....


7

One of the first students to be sent away for education may have been the son of José de la Guerra y Noriega, Juan José Noriega, who was sent to Liverpool, England for education in 1825. When he returned to California in c.1831 at the age of about 21 he was tutored in higher mathematics by Father Patrick Short who in 1834 jointly with William Hartnell, who ...


7

I have managed to locate online copies of the San Francisco Journal of George Burrowes, 1858-1875 (Edited by Charles A. Anderson, and with a biographical sketch by Clifford M. Drury), which might now provide a more-or-less definitive answer to your question. This was published in three parts in the Journal of the Presbyterian Historical Society and is ...


7

Normally it is difficult to provide evidence that something doesn't exist. I can offer this article on another website, Society of Private and Pioneer Numismatics, concerning early coins used in California (emphasis mine): There is some evidence that tokens were used in exchange for labor and goods. On September 3rd, 1846, a visitor to Sutter’s fort, ...


6

In an article on the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, PBS offers the following estimate: At the time of the treaty, approximately 80,000 Mexicans lived in the ceded territory, which comprised only about 4 percent of Mexico’s population. PBS


6

To make the answer short not very well. Their treatment under the ranchos was pretty much the same as their treatment under the Missions. The articles mentioned they were paid in goods and alcohol, though some may have been paid in cash or script, I guess it would depend on the Ranchero. "A California rancho might employ as few as twenty or as many as ...


6

I found independent confirmation of this tradition in the 1848 diary of James C. Ward, which was serialized in The Argonaut in 1878. He described "the riding-dress usually worn here" as including "leather bottas bound around the calves, with knife tucked into the top of the right one". Zavalishin and Ward were from different countries and wrote in different ...


6

Presumably this had to do with the Save the Bay movement that started in the early sixties. This movement was a backlash against the filling that had happened up unto that point: While Reber’s plan never broke ground, many others did and by 1961, the Bay was a third smaller than it was a little more than a century before. The particular trigger was a ...


6

Auguste Duhaut-Cilly visited Fort Ross in 1828. He made a famous drawing of the fort and wrote: We went with Mr. Shelekhov to view his timber production.... Mr. Shelekhov showed me the trunk of one that had been felled recently; it was twenty feet in diameter measured two feet from the ground and from one burl or buttress to the other; the main trunk was ...


6

The book Historic Spots in California: Fifth Edition claims the term moro was used to indicate anything black, and that tradition says that a lame black horse gave the name to this particular tract of land The horse story is repeated in the Encyclopedia of California entry on Castroville, which also includes a possible reference to black soil of the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible