16

Territory Governor Riley, who had summoned the constitutional convention, had 1,000 English and 250 Spanish copied printed "post-haste" and distributed around the state. In addition, many of the convention delegates themselves stood for the election just 4 weeks later, by their campaigning further promulgating news and description of the pending ...


12

It was published at least twice in the newspaper Alta California, on November 1 and November 8. It may have appeared in other newspapers as well, but this was what I was able to find with a quick search.


11

No. In 1814 a Scotsman by the name of John Cameron jumped ship. He later changed his name to Gilroy. Here's some info from the city of Gilroy California web page. John Cameron was born in a southern district of Inverness-shire, Scotland in 1794. At 19, he left home, hiring aboard a British trading ship which arrived, in 1814, at what was then the Spanish ...


8

To add to the accepted answer, here is some additional information perhaps indirectly related to the question. This plaque in San Francisco, California Historical Landmark No. 819, includes the phrase "this venture caused wide speculation about British intentions". Part of the background to this may be this letter (page 1 and page 2) that William G....


7

One of the first students to be sent away for education may have been the son of José de la Guerra y Noriega, Juan José Noriega, who was sent to Liverpool, England for education in 1825. When he returned to California in c.1831 at the age of about 21 he was tutored in higher mathematics by Father Patrick Short who in 1834 jointly with William Hartnell, who ...


7

Normally it is difficult to provide evidence that something doesn't exist. I can offer this article on another website, Society of Private and Pioneer Numismatics, concerning early coins used in California (emphasis mine): There is some evidence that tokens were used in exchange for labor and goods. On September 3rd, 1846, a visitor to Sutter’s fort, ...


6

Most likely not. Or if she did, it wasn't because of "Three Days". Several accounts of "Three Days" give the impression that the eponymous weekend was concurrent with Xiola Blue being in California for her father's funeral. This naturally leads to the question of whether she actually attended the funeral, or if she was too otherwise ...


5

It looks to me as if there are clearly differentiable technologies at use in these lands. Primarily, I understand, we are interested in those which did not use tar for waterproofing and instead attained waterproofing through weaving only (such that these items could be used in cooking, etc) (thanks @jamesqf for this link). Willow The above article mentions '...


4

This is not a budget and being from 1850 is outside the Mexican period but it may be of some use. And if you scroll forward/down from that link you will find many more! Later - Many Many more!


4

To add to Aaron's answer: The first retail store keeper in Monterey was probably Don David Spence, born 24 October 1798 in the parish of Huntly, Scotland to David Spence and his wife Helen Stewart: (registration required to access this birth record. Due to copyright restrictions I am unable to post the image) Scotlands People He died 18 February 1875 in ...


4

According to Cooper by Woolfenden & Elkinton, pp. 24-31: California's new governor, Luis Argüello, purchased Juan Bautista Rogers Cooper's ship Rover in December 1823. The vessel was loaded with seal pelts and sent to Canton, first making stops in Honolulu, Fanning Island, and Manila. It reached Canton in June 1824, returning to Bodega Bay by October 23,...


3

According to the book Bandido: The Life and Times of Tiburcio Vasquez By John Boessenecker (2012, p. 4), Anza started recruiting in Culiacán on March 28, 1775. I have the impression that he was only there for a few days at most. This page from the US National Park Service also mentions that Anza was at Culiacán in March, but then says: He continued ...


3

Note I'm not intending this to be the answer, but rather a summary of my research that will hopefully help you along. My line of thinking towards a possible solution went along these lines: Trends that have existed in published works; Origin of the abbreviation "St."; Possible influences on this (though it may be quite difficult to choose a ...


3

Just to add a bit of extra info to justCal's answer, below are links to two document images in the Vallejo volumes. The first is a statement of Mulligan/Milligan's account with William Hartnell in 1829. The second is a letter in 1851 from a solicitor in Belfast to John Milliken's executor William Hartnell. Mulligan/Milligan/Milliken are apparently name ...


2

The first two images below are samples from a book which appears to be a record of payments in kind made to soldiers in the San Francisco Presidio in 1817, which perhaps confirms the suggestion in the question that they were unpaid during the war. The document in the following images appears to show the payments made to the officers and men in the San ...


2

In support of Aaron's answer: On 24th September 1825 John Begg in Lima wrote to McCulloch Hartnell & Co(in effect Hartnell, McCulloch was in Callao) advising them(him) of 6000 dollars cash and 15000 dollars worth of goods shipped to California on the Speedy: https://archive.org/details/documentos3305189994vall/page/n397/mode/2up (my transcription) ...


2

Looking quickly at a couple of relevant archeological papers like this and this, a few things stand out. One, California was apparently one of the first places in North America to develop basket technology, so their technology had the longest to develop . Two, scarcity of fresh water in the environment may have produced the need for waterproof baskets. Three,...


2

Perhaps just partial answer, cum grano salis One thing that's amiss from the story is that Lisa Chester didn't plan and go to any funeral that related to her 'official father': Lisa Chester BIRTH 14 Oct 1968 DEATH 6 Jun 1987 (aged 18) BURIAL Beth El Memorial Park Cemetery Livonia, Wayne County, Michigan, USA PLOT TBE Sec 4 Lot 102 Gr 9 MEMORIAL ID ...


2

Well there's an account by one of the people involved. According to Jane Bainter, Farrell's housemate, Xiola Blue made the trip in order to visit Casey Niccoli and Perry Farrell. Bainter makes no mention of any funeral. Neither, notice, does the Guardian article that you hyperlinked to. Jane Bainter: Xiola Blue was another huge influence on Perry. More ...


1

According to LeCount & Strong's San Francisco City Directory for the Year 1854, the U.S. Land Commission met in John Parrott's "Iron Building" at 148 California Street. According to Igler's Industrial Cowboys (2001): ... the four floors of his Iron Building conveniently housed the clerks, archives, and officers of the U.S. Board of Land Claims ...


1

Question: Did Britain look into taking California? Short Answer: Yes, Beyond looking into there were plans conveyed to the British Government by it's Ministers. The United States border with the British in Canada in the far west was disputed until June 15th 1846. Prior to this there were various British plans to assume or compete with the United States ...


1

Corn needs summer rain or irrigation, so it was the main cereal throughout Mexico, the Southwest and east of the Rockies. California's climate (winter rain, dry summers) was better suited for wheat and Northern California became the wheat basket for all of Spanish America (and later Mexico). As a result, wheat flour tortillas where the staple in California ...


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