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Question: Did Britain look into taking California? Short Answer: Yes, Beyond looking into there were plans conveyed to the British Government by it's Ministers. The United States border with the British in Canada in the far west was disputed until June 15th 1846. Prior to this there were various British plans to assume or compete with the United States ...


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To add to the accepted answer, here is some additional information perhaps indirectly related to the question. This plaque in San Francisco, California Historical Landmark No. 819, includes the phrase "this venture caused wide speculation about British intentions". Part of the background to this may be this letter (page 1 and page 2) that William G....


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Not really an answer, but an explanation of why such is likely very rare, and will likely not resemble a modern expectation. Note that while double entry bookkeeping predates the publication of "Summa de Arithmetica, Geometria, Proportioni et Proportionalita" in 1494, by Luca Pacioli, this is not true of either accrual accounting or the financial ...


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Territory Governor Riley, who had summoned the constitutional convention, had 1,000 English and 250 Spanish copied printed "post-haste" and distributed around the state. In addition, many of the convention delegates themselves stood for the election just 4 weeks later, by their campaigning further promulgating news and description of the pending ...


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It was published at least twice in the newspaper Alta California, on November 1 and November 8. It may have appeared in other newspapers as well, but this was what I was able to find with a quick search.


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This is not a budget and being from 1850 is outside the Mexican period but it may be of some use. And if you scroll forward/down from that link you will find many more! Later - Many Many more!


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Note I'm not intending this to be the answer, but rather a summary of my research that will hopefully help you along. My line of thinking towards a possible solution went along these lines: Trends that have existed in published works; Origin of the abbreviation "St."; Possible influences on this (though it may be quite difficult to choose a ...


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Just to add a bit of extra info to justCal's answer, below are links to two document images in the Vallejo volumes. The first is a statement of Mulligan/Milligan's account with William Hartnell in 1829. The second is a letter in 1851 from a solicitor in Belfast to John Milliken's executor William Hartnell. Mulligan/Milligan/Milliken are apparently name ...


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No. In 1814 a Scotsman by the name of John Cameron jumped ship. He later changed his name to Gilroy. Here's some info from the city of Gilroy California web page. John Cameron was born in a southern district of Inverness-shire, Scotland in 1794. At 19, he left home, hiring aboard a British trading ship which arrived, in 1814, at what was then the Spanish ...


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