15

There wasn't anything for it to spread south to. OK, there is one exception that Mr. de Bernardy pointed out in the comments. Somalia is south of Ethiopia (when it wasn't part of its empire), and there were conversions there. Many people living there were Jewish and Christian, and some of the Jewish converts may have reached as far south as modern Tanzania. ...


15

Well, if we can change venue to Alexandria, which was a Roman city in Egypt with roughly similar standing to Antioch (they both housed a Christian Patriarch), and roll the date forward by only 5 years, then the fate of Hypatia might be a pretty good guide. The short version is that she was a pagan philosopher, who was well-liked in the pagan community, and ...


12

There wasn't a sudden change from one to the other and ring halos above the head appeared in art from time to time over several centuries. What happened first was that the traditional halo went into decline in the late middle ages because artists wanted more realism and flexibility. So the traditional halo behind the head either became a disc above the head, ...


8

In 361-363 the Empire was ruled by a pagan emperor. His successors were Christian, but the empire was still a multi-religious state. It is only in 381 (under Theodosius) that introduction of uniformity and persecution of non-Christians began. So you can expect blasphemy laws from that time only and they were gradually introduced. The citation from John ...


5

Terminological precision: Celibate = unmarried (cælebs = single, unmarried) The Church has allowed married men to become priests. St. Peter, for example, was married. Continent = not having sexual relations The Church has always required all (married or celibate) clerics to be 100% continent and never allowed priests to marry after their ordinations. ...


4

Question: Is it true that Christian English monks adopted Norse hairstyles before the start of the Viking age? Short Answer Not monks nobles not before Lindisfarne but just after. Yes it's true vikings(Norsemen) traveled to Britain before the age of Vikings and Lindisfarne(June 8, 793). Anglo Saxons who invaded the British Islands after the Roman Period ...


4

The version of the Nicene creed as modified by the Council of Constantinople in AD 381 includes: he was crucified for us under Pontius Pilate, and suffered, and was buried, and the third day he rose again, according to the Scriptures, and ascended into heaven, and sitteth on the right hand of the Father; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicene_Creed1 So a ...


4

A quick search brings up the book The Mughal World: Life in India's Last Golden Age By Abraham Eraly, pg 284, which seems to have some figures for this particular time and reign: Another source, History Of Aurangzib Vol. 3, by Sarkar, Jadunath, shows the same information:


4

Interest in the historicity of Jesus began over two hundred years ago and has been increasing overall till our post-modern day, when the number of books, articles, essays, monographs and PhD theses on this subject have become truly staggering. Many approaches have been taken--from quality scholarship to the fringes--and the sheer volume of material is not ...


4

You are right. This can be a heated question, as is evident from comments, upvotes, downvotes, and votes to close. TL;DR There is no consensus among historians, so much is sure. There was a crisis in the Western part of the Roman Empire, connected to the collapse of the central authority there, but obvious in demographics, economic and political ...


3

Mieszko's baptism in AD 966 brought catholic monks who, for quite a while were the only literate men in the new state. Before Christianity arrived to Poland there was no one to write it's history. There are only a handful of external sources like Ibrahim ibn Yaqub or Thietmar of Merseburg from around that time.


3

Yes. I know. It was not created in Florence but in the Monastery of Saint John the Forerunner "at Stoudios".


3

Just a partial answer here to one of the questions posed in the body (not in the title): "Is it safe to assume that such marriages of marrying off a Christian daughter resulted in their forced conversion to Islam, and that they were not allowed to remain Christian?" It was not always the case that the wife would convert to Islam, at least when the ...


2

Question: Are there any thirteenth century sources (Christian, Islamic, or Jewish) linking (the timing of) the fifth crusade to a possibly self-fulfilling prophecy1 from (the eighth chapter2 of) the Book of Daniel ? The Papal bull Quia maior in which Pope Innocent III in April 1213 called for the Fifth Crusade is such a document. In this document Pope ...


2

Yes, the BBC still has "BBC Radio 4 Sunday Worship" and has broadcast other religious programs, especially but not always on Christmas. From 1938 the BBC broadcast Elder Lightfoot Solomon Michaux's "Radio Church of God" in some markets. Per Wikipedia: There have also been religious programmes, of mostly Anglican celebration and often from the Church of St....


2

To blaspheme which god? In 363, if you blasphemed the pagan gods, an emperor wrote disparagingly about your city. If you blasphemed Christ, the Persian army slew you at Samarra. This doesn't apply to the other years. It's interesting that you included Julian's reign.


2

I suspect that after the king of kings of Aksum converted to Christianity the government gradually converted all the people to Christianity. And whenever Aksum conquered a new region efforts would have been made to convert the population. One area where Aksum expanded was into South Arabia. But if Aksum converted a lot of Arabs to Christianity the effort ...


2

the previous answer which got down voted is generally correct. Almost everything we know about Jesus comes to us from the New Testament. Jesus's crucifixion date is calculated based on a literal interpretation of the bible. The date chosen seeks to find a year which proves not one Gospel, but all four Gospels (Mark, Luke, Matthew and John) and the ...


2

Short answer: Cross? What cross? Was there really a noteworthy one? That seems quite doubtful. More detailed answer: A first thought is of course that the depictions shown so far are not entirely realistic. Icons have a halo, real people do not. Churches are marked in pictures with a cross, they do seldom have one in reality, very seldom if it should be ...


1

Question: What politics were implemented to accomplish the Christian tradition and try to keep what is written in the Holy Bible? . Once the Roman Emperor; Constantine the Great; made that Christianity began the transition as the dominant religion of the Roman Empire: So after legalizing Christianity Constantine called the leaders of Christianity to ...


1

It is entirely possible to find ancient Greeks and Romans discussing this very matter. My amateur opinion is that it was sort of a favorite parlor game to try to map the gods of one civilization to those of another, and maybe discover new ones. I'll provide several examples of this from Herodotus. People are pretty skeptical of Herodotus in terms of factual ...


1

This question assumes that Constantine was a calculating politician who converted to Christianity for personal advantage and not out of pure holiness. Your assumption is (half) wrong (and half right). As to the former (half wrong) part, most people living before the European Enlightenment were theists, and leaders, be they political or military, were ...


1

I would say that the opposite would be true. The German anti-Semitism was firmly rooted in good old Christian anti-Semitism. What it made the German anti-Semitism special was that it also targeted those who converted to Christianity, but it did so by claiming they only paid lip service and that they were still Jewish.


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