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1

This depends on the reason why the person was living in a monastery. Often monasteries were used as prisons explicitly. Some people were simply forbidden leaving, this often happened with people who were criminals, rebels or lost power struggle with opponents but for some reasons their lives were spared. In other words, monasteries often were used as a ...


0

Ancient Greece was always divided into self-ruled city-state kingdoms. People of each of these had their own distinct culture and they traced descendance with a particular god or any other figures like a hero. Accordingly they believed that the deity of their city protects and helps develop their city. So they mainly worshipped the gods of their own city. ...


47

In principle, they were not supposed to leave their order because they took a vow for life. In practice, some did leave, and some were subsequently readmitted. However, the time period covered here is very long, and different orders - and individuals within orders - were probably sometimes more, sometimes less inclined to allow people to leave. Consequently, ...


14

"Decide to leave" was always an option to consider. And one could do that, of course. Just do that. But it seems the question is more about the obstacles and costs that may be associated with that? As, obviously, also when in prison anyone might decide to leave. Can't she? It is an incredibly large timeframe to analyze and no clear geographical ...


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