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26

Going beyond E.B. or Wikipedia: The official website of the Hagia Sophia Museum states The first church [at the H.S. site] was constructed by Emperor Konstantios [i.e. Constantine's son] (337-361) in 360. The first church was covered with a wooden roof and expanded vertically (basilica) yet was burned down after the public riot that took place in 404 ...


24

Yes, this was perfectly common. It was seen as a privilege to be buried inside the church (the closer to the altar, the better). These are not cenotaphs, these are actual tombs, with people slowly decomposing under them. Churches must have stunk horribly (possibly why a common theme in legends of saints were that their bodies did not decompose and smelled ...


21

Very interesting. I found this explanation on geneology.about.com: In earlier times, a marriage bond was given to the court by the intended groom prior to his marriage. It affirmed that there was no moral or legal reason why the couple could not be married and it also affirmed that the groom would not change his mind. If he did, and did not marry ...


14

Impossible No religious institution has ever been decorated by the Soviet government. I do not have a definitive proof (that would require searching through all the decoration records, which, given the fantastic generosity in decorations - tens of millions decorations awarded - is beyond my capabilities), but I am quite confident that this has never ...


11

According to Ivan Gobry's Martin Luther, Luther thought that Sin is undefeatable, for lust will inexorably take residencde in each of us, therefore, to condemn oneself to celibacy, intending to please God, is to engage in self-deception and hypocrisy. Gobry also says that Luther believed the requirement that priests and monks stay celibate to be an ...


11

After getting clues from the accepted answer above and found this other article. It maybe be useful to someone in the future MARRIAGE BONDS AND ALLEGATIONS - POINTS TO REMEMBER • Marriage bonds and allegations only exist for couples who applied to marry by licence. They do not exist for couples who married by banns. • The marriage allegation was ...


8

Peter Laurisden mentions "seven priests" among the first detachment that left with Bering from St. Petersberg in 1733. On the same page he also describes a "list of names of those engaged", but I am unable to find this list.


7

Yes. These ell standards on churches were installed to prevent trade disputes, especially with tailors. The churches whose ells are pictured here are the St. Walpurgis-Kirche in Apfelstädt and Domkirche St. Stephan zu Wien. It is not clear to me if they had anything at all to do with the Edict of Pîtres, but here are the ells.


7

It was a very richly decorated building. I would say: it still is. Architectural simulations of the kind depicted in the question are obviously far from complete. But the complete lack of images, while the ornaments were taken into account, might also indicate an (idealised?) Muslim stage of the structure as the goal. But the rendering is very likely just ...


6

In the church of Rome there was no contradiction between being both a member of the church and being titled. In fact, some entire states were ruled by priests. For example, the Archbishopric of Salzburg was an independent principality for centuries right in the middle of Europe which was ruled by an archbishop who was inevitably from some noble family. The ...


6

The Wikipedia page on Thomas Becket contains this excerpt: Upon hearing reports of Becket's actions, Henry is said to have uttered words that were interpreted by his men as wishing Becket killed.[9] The king's exact words are in doubt and several versions have been reported.[10] The most commonly quoted, as handed down by oral tradition, is "Will no one ...


6

Here's a link to an article in Russian that explores the question of which priests were attached to Bering's expedition. According to it, one of the priests was a Lutheran pastor (excuse me if I get the titles wrong, I am not exactly well-versed in translation of church hierarchy from Russian to English), who in different sources is referred either as Ernst ...


6

It is difficult to say exactly how much was lost. We have some sources that enable us to say what manuscripts were held by some monasteries, for example the library at Peterborough, or that at Syon Abbey. Many of the manuscripts ended up in private libraries, with the best often ending up in the Royal Library manuscript holding. Wikipedia provides an ...


5

Not only was this common, it was hard to change. In my country (Portugal) there was even a popular uprising in 1846 caused by, among other things, the prohibition on burials inside churches.


5

The arrangement of modern Christian gatherings is the result of the development of early church architecture. In the early days, up to the fourth century, Christians worshipped along with Jews in synagogues and private houses. After Jewish and Christian worship separated, Christians continued to worship in people's houses (known as house churches), often ...


5

According to I. V. Viter, in 1767 the town population couldn't support the church, so it was moved to nearby Paratunka. According to Svetlana G. Federova and her coauthor Yakov M. Svet, Captain Charles Clerke was buried in 1779 "on the high northern shore of the Petropavlovsk harbor near a new church that was being built". According to A. Sgibnev, quoted ...


5

The French imprisoned both Pius VI and Pius VII. You should be able to find plenty of hits during the "pornocracy" between 867–1049 CE. Leo V was imprisoned by an antipope. John X was imprisoned at the height of the pornocracy as was poor Benedict VI. John IV was another unfortunate who was imprisoned by an antipope. Then there's infamous Formosus who, ...


5

To understand where a cathedral might be placed, it is important to understand the function and history of cathedrals. Note that the history is likely to depend on many different factors, and be different for different places, and that (as noted on the Wikipedia page): "... cathedrals did not become universal within the Western Catholic Church until the ...


4

God said in Genesis 2:18, "It is not good for the man to be alone. I will make a helper suitable for him." Paul said in 1 Corinthians 7:1-2, "Now for the matters you wrote about: 'It is good for a man not to have sexual relations with a woman.' But since sexual immorality is occurring, each man should have sexual relations with his own wife..." (Ever notice ...


4

The Church of England permitted nonconforming or dissident sects. They were not members of the CoE, but only the Roman Catholics were officially prohibited. @T.E.D. questions whether it was illegal to be Roman Catholic. The situation is not entirely black and white, but After a brief experiment with Protestantism under his son Edward VI (1547-53) and ...


4

Actually I've just found out about such situation. In 1303, Philip IV of France, who was in a long conflict with Pope Boniface VIII, decided to judge the pope for his blasphemies (as a politic consequence of the papal bull Unam Sanctam). He sent Guillaume de Nogaret with 1600 soldiers to Rome. Boniface VIII tried to escape, but was found in family residence ...


4

Pope Liberius was exiled to Thrace for a while in the mid 4th century. During the early middle ages it was not unheard of for the Byzantine emperor to send people to arrest (or murder) the Pope in Rome when he started acting too independently for the emperor's taste. A prime example is Pope Martin I, who was arrested on the orders of Emperor Constans II and ...


3

You have the difference in the last bullet points of your two lists. Galileo was an experimental scientist, engineer first - math for him was the most comfortable tool to describe the nature's phenomena he studied. From his works, it seems that "why" was less important than "how" for him. Also, note that Galileo's mathematical methods were not very different ...


2

One point that I don't think is clear from the other answers is that your ancestor did not pay a bond of £200. The £200 was not paid unless the terms of the bond were breached. Practically speaking, this meant that the £200 would only be due if there was some legal impediment to the marriage that was not disclosed, and subsequently discovered. The cost of ...


2

At some points in some areas it was common for the second son to join the Church The first would inherit the father's land, possessions, title etc. in full, to avoid the problem created by consecutive division the father's possession (especially with land). Sending the second son to the Church would give the family some standing in the Catholic Church, ...


2

No, they were not. Church was an "opium for the folk" so church institutions could not deserve to be decorated with respected symbols of communism. This Marx phrase was the official view. Soviet regime was strong enough on its own. There was no need for it to accept any help from religious institutions, even if offered. And the official negative position ...


2

The mission comisionados and mayordomos were appointed by the Monterey junta and by governors, principally Figueroa and Alvarado, or by the mission inspector Hartnell. According to Carlos Salomon in "Pio Pico at Mission San Luis Rey", rules laid out by Figueroa specify that the administrator take the mission inventory, pay off its debts, distribute land and ...


2

You are out of luck for all but the very end of the period you describe. Congregational hymn singing was strongly frowned upon in the Anglican Church until popularized by Isaac Watts (1674-1748) in the early 18th century. Watts led by including new poetry for "original songs of Christian experience" to be used in worship, according to Marini. The older ...


1

The church in nearby Paratunka continued to serve the area as the new Petropavlovsk church was under construction for a long time. Fedorova described it as "being built" in 1779; it was consecrated in 1810, and the chapel rebuilt in 1814, per Камчатский краеведческий музей; Peard found it "nearly finished" in 1827, with the clergyman still residing at ...


1

This is not a proper answer but it comments on various aspects (including "the why"), brings some anecdotes, and it is too long for a comment. in English, there is even the word 'churchyard'. it means that the usual place to be buried was the yard of a church, even for the poor. Separate large cemeteries are a more recent development, when the population ...


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