114

If you, as a nation, have the capability to decode communications, then why give that up? This is a fallacious assumption, and probably the source of your confusion. Destroying the bombes did not amount to the British "giving up" their code breaking capabilities, as the bombes were essentially mechanical ASICs, designed specifically to break the encryption ...


33

It appears that Churchill was not at first aware of the meaning of the offensive version of the gesture. While he had no title, he was very much an aristocrat, and his insight into the behaviour of the British lower classes was fairly limited. This is plausible: the UK was far more stratified by social class than it is today, which is still quite a lot ...


33

Stalin made the suggestion of executing 50,000 German officers at the Tehran Conference in 1943. The story was reported by President Roosevelt’s son Elliot and in Churchill's memoirs after the war. It's worth noting that Stalin had ordered the execution of some 15,000 Polish officers at Katyn earlier in the war. The discovery of the bodies of these officers ...


28

Most people who worked on Enigma code-breaking didn't know the real name of the system, or the scale of the effort being made. That contributed to the secret of the breaking of Enigma being kept until the 1970s. So "appearing less threatening" is a non-issue. The few nations who know, already know, and have better cryptography. Nobody else knows. The ...


18

If you, as a nation, have the capability to decode communications, then why give that up? This is independent of whether or not the Enigma machines were destroyed -- that ability should, if nothing else, discourage others from even trying, or at least give a head start in case someone did try to use encrypted communications. The knowledge that your ...


18

In 1943, some 3 million indian subjects of the British Raj died due to bengal famine. I think the most authentic and rich source for examining and finding evidences against Churchill in this incident is Madhusree Mukerjee's book, 'Churchill's Secret War', which reveals a side of Churchill's largely ignored in the West and considerably tarnishes his heroic ...


15

The obvious interpretation is your point that the position of Vienna was similar to that of Berlin: both were in the eastern part of the country, surrounded by the Soviet occupation zone, even if the position within the city itself was different. So if you drew a line across Europe showing the areas controlled by the Soviet Red Army or by local ...


13

The speech was part of a secret session briefing on the situation in North Africa on 10 December 1942. The original papers are held at the UK National Archives under reference PREM3/442/12. That quote was part of a section that read: “I now turn to examine a peculiar form of French mentality, or rather of the mentality of a large proportion of Frenchmen ...


11

The answers @bhau and @coleopterist gave are good and marshal a lot of important evidence, but there are complementary points of view someone ought to mention - so I guess it falls to me to do this. Madhusree Mukerjee's findings have been disputed by the eminent Indian economist Amartya Sen. I haven't read both books yet but perusal of the wiki entry about ...


10

I'd like to add some second-hand context to Paul Rowe's first-hand context. England of the early 20th Century had a very different perspective about technology than we do today. Our most recent innovations have brought the public things like the Internet and ubiquitous cheap connectivity. Theirs had most recently brought mustard gas and automatic weaponry, ...


9

There was a civil war in Spain shortly before World War II that was a "testing ground" for the main war. That is, the Axis powers and the Soviet Union supported the Nationalist and Republican sides respectively, and got to test some tactics. The main German contribution was the Condor Legion that was (secretly) trained in Germany and operated in Spain, ...


9

That was the peace offer, it was essentially repeating a similar offer made in October 1939. Halifax's reply is here. Its content isn't especially remarkable, although coming from Lord Halifax, who had proposed suing for peace in May, was important.


8

It was precisely the strategic bombing campaign that Mussolini's forces based in Majorca unleashed against Catalan cities which attracted a great deal of attention by British observers. A number of both military officers and politicians and civil servants tried to learn as much as possible about the possible countermeasures and the bombing's impact on ...


8

tl;dr Was the loss of life in the Bengal famine of 1943 the largest British empire human loss in the Second World War? Yes, without doubt. Did Churchill expressly refuse to alleviate the famine with food aid, or veto US and Australian offers to send food? Absolutely not. The evidence shows that statement is completely untrue, although it might be argued ...


8

What makes the most sense to me was that in 1945 he (actually his party) had just been voted out of office. At this point he still had hopes of getting back the majority (and perhaps the PM office), and in fact he did regain it in 1951. So I think in 1945 he was mostly telling you what his problem was. He was still an active politician, and as such it would ...


8

The order of the garter was "Restored to gift of the Sovereign by Attlee in 1946". So maybe he wouldn't accept it from the Labour prime minister but would accept it from the monarch. I personally think 'sour grapes, dissipating' is the explanation, it fits with his personality, which seems a bit tempestuous. And he did change party (or "Cross the Floor") ...


7

As per a few comments here: They weren't all destroyed. Reading a few books on the times there's strong hints that at least some capability was retained - both Bombes and more advanced equipment. The Brits captured many Enigma machines and also the more advanced Lorenz (if memory serves) which they could also break. Both were either used by/sold to allies ...


7

Firstly, I think you may be getting a little confused between life peers and hereditary peers. Life peers are given a peerage or title for their lifetime only. It is not hereditary and it cannot be handed down to their children. When that person dies, the peerage or title dies with them. They are not expected to maintain a country estate or multiple houses,...


6

Semaphore pointed out historical examples. I believe the context (thank you for providing the link) also helps. The following are all quotes from that same speech. The disastrous military events which have happened during the past fortnight have not come to me with any sense of surprise. The Admiralty had confidence at that time in their ability to prevent ...


5

In the original speech, Churchill said "by the lights of a perverted science". He may perhaps have been speaking about Hitler's pure-bred Aryan superbeings, and the now discredited but then accepted science or pseudo-science of eugenics - the creation of an improved human race through select breeding of the finest specimens. The "lights" of this perverted ...


5

It is a long speech, roughly 4,000 words, of which I doubt more than a paragraph or two is repeated in the movie (which I have not yet seen). Churchill was an accomplished orator, likely one of the best ever in the history of the English language. Part of that skill is matching the emotion of the message to the emotion of the delivery. In a speech calling ...


4

As another answerer pointed out, the context was the difference between the willingness of the British and the French to carry on the struggle against the Germans from their overseas (e.g. African) colonies, and specifically on during Operation Torch. The differences were best summed up in Wikipedia article on France's Descartes: Descartes laid the ...


4

It's a stretch (that's what comes of translation) but perhaps: Those who are prone, by temperament and character, to seek sharp and clear-cut solutions of difficult and obscure problems, who are ready to fight whenever some challenge comes from a foreign power, have not always been right. On the other hand, those whose inclination is to bow their ...


4

That may be a simple geographical error. That happens to the best. However as Semaphore commented: "It isn't a geographical error. He didn't say "draw a straight line from…" In fact, in Europe at least, borders are almost never straight lines. He was simply stating that an "Iron Curtain" was being put in place that meandered across Europe (following the then ...


4

What Churchill is referring to were various German scientific inventions which confounded the British and at the time seemed miraculous and terrifying, at least to the military analysts that knew about them. Since Churchill was privy to secret briefings describing these technologies, so far as they were known, he had been exposed to these fears. His remark ...


4

No he wasn't. He abdicated of his own free will choosing Wallis Simpson over the throne. He abdicated because as a British Monarch he was the nominal head of the Church of England that did not allow divorcees to remarry. The Church strongly disapproved of Edward's intention to marry a divorcee in Wallis Simpson. He was also viewed as a bit of playboy and ...


3

I recall a quote by one of Churchill's senior generals about his military prowess going something like this:  "Churchill's amazing; he comes up with 10 completely original ideas every single day. Of course, only one of them is any good; and Winston doesn't know which one it is." I argue that the fundamental difference between the management styles ...


3

I wanted to include the pictures of both gestures and add to the given answer. The gesture was explained to Churchill many times according to his private secretary and Churchill continued to use both the victory sign and the vulgar sign interchangeable with palm facing both ways before he eventually did confine himself to the victory sign (palm facing ...


3

The destruction of the Colossus code breaking computers was a more significant thing, I gather the reasoning was the if the machines were retained other powers would pursue such technology. Britain had their own cipher machine typeX, there was some fear that if the cipher breaking machines became general knowledge then other powers would develop it and be ...


1

Remember that rapid developments in general computers just after WWII rendered the specialized code breaking machines antiquated within a few years anyways. To keep them around stored somewhere, where someone could stumble upon them, would only unnecessary increase the chance that England's code breaking capabilities became know to other powers.


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