Hot answers tagged

110

To pick just one notorious example, 99 years ago to the day, black people's homes were heavily looted by whites in the Tulsa riots of 1921. As this article describes, at least 65 looters were arrested. In addition to taking basic goods like sacks of flour, they opened up safes in people's homes to take gold and silver. EDIT, July 2020: I should have made ...


53

First because most cities in France are much smaller than cities in the US. Compare a list of French cities by population with the same for the US. There are 11 cities in the US bigger than the 2nd largest in France (Marseille at ~855,000) and 34 bigger than the 3rd largest (Lyon at ~500,000). Second, it does have big Atlantic coastal cities... by French ...


49

General observations on early urban policing In 1800, only four cities in the US had populations of around 25,000 or more - the largest of these was New York with 60,000 (the others were Philadelphia, Baltimore and Boston) - so the challenges of policing in the US up to the early 1800s were much less than in the major cities of Europe where London was just ...


44

Yes. In San Francisco, 1849, a gang called the "Hounds" looted and destroyed residences in the district of Little Chile: "The Chileans in large numbers are living in tents on the outskirts of town. About 10 o'clock at night the Hounds made an assault upon them, tore down more than a dozen of their tents, broke open their chests, stole their money, tore ...


30

I've combined the data in: List of largest cities throughout history World population estimates The winners are: Modern Tokyo (metropolitan area), home to 0.55% of the world's population 700 AD Chang'an, home to 0.44% of the world's population 200 AD Rome, home to 0.42% of the world's population 1 AD Rome, 400 AD Rome, and 1900 AD London follow, all ...


29

The answer is threefold: 1) Transportation costs: agricultural societies had, since the beginning, been restricted by the amount of food one could produce locally. What 'freed' the British poor from having to work the land (please note I'm not arguing that this was in their favor) was the import of large amount of cheap food, as well as the materials to ...


24

Bordeaux and Nantes are major cities and their proximity to the Atlantic coast was key to their development so there is nothing unusual about France in this respect, it does have some major port cities on the Atlantic coast. The question, then, is really one of local geography. Those cities are located a few tens of kilometres away from the actual coastline,...


23

is their any other place that could have held this moniker prior to that time? Yes. Washington (population 67,000) is a town in historic County Durham in England. The earliest extant references to it appear in Old English and date to 1096. As your question didn't specify that the place had to be within the United States, this would be the oldest place with ...


19

Wages. Labour was too cheap for an Industrial revolution. Early industrialisation must be profitable in order to be widely adopted and sustainable. With cheap labour the replacement of human labour with machines just isn't profitable. Research and development of early machines is expensive and slow, if there is no pay off, (trey making of money but cheaper ...


18

There are many reasons for why cities seem to have an inordinate amount of churches for the population. The first of this is that some churches are never built as public churches. Many churches are built to show off how devout and wealthy you are. Kościół św. Wojciecha fits at best a 100 people standing up, and is clearly one of those churches. Also ...


17

I would not say "most" but many people owned them. In the big cities, especially children (I am not talking about rural areas). Streets were NOT crowded with bikes (cannot even compare with Denmark or China, and even with Germany). Bikes were affordable and available, but few adult people in the big cities used them for transportation. They were used more ...


17

According to this article from the Free Lance-Star (referencing American Philatelist), there were seven other US towns called "Washington" that were established prior to Washington D.C. It indicates that Washington, Virginia was the oldest to be surveyed and populated in 1749 (although it only achieved 'town' status in the 1790s) and Washington, North ...


15

The question is still a little bit fuzzy, but I think its due to not understanding what drove trade in the pre-industrial era, so I'm just going to get into that. The basic consideration here is transport. Prior to the invention of the railroad, shipping over water was vastly more efficient than doing it any other way. So back then it was almost more ...


15

Crime investigation was minimal, particularly because forensic science was non-existent or very crude. No fingerprinting. No autopsies to determine cause of death. No investigation of the crime scene for subtle clues like hairs or carpet pieces. They might use superstitions as well. It was a common practice as late as colonial Massachusetts to force a ...


14

The implication of the question is that Meso-American cultures didn't employ any architectural defenses ("walls"). I don't think that's true at all. Below is a pictoral recreation of Cahokia. That city was probably far too large and spread out to totally wall up, but you can clearly see there was a wall around the central districts. The text with the ...


13

The British bombardment of Copenhagen in September 1807, to deny to the French the possible use of the Danish fleet, seems to fit the bill. The impacts, explosions, and fires resulted in nearly 1,000 direct civilian casualties in a neutral country. It also delayed and nearly ended attempts to publish the first modern edition of Beowulf, due to scholarly ...


11

There wasn't enough work. This was originally a problem created by slave labor: wealthy nobles owned slaves and large estates, and small farmers could not compete with them. They had to sell their land or work for a wealthy patrician, and a lot of them eventually gave up and moved to the city. This was a constant source of civil unrest in Rome and quite a ...


11

No, that was part of the defense strategy. Making the walls a little bit stronger over all wouldn't help as much as building a very strong keep. That's the general idea behind it. You are absolutely right to assume that those heavily fortified castles within cities were there for a reason: usually to keep the citizens at bay. In many fortified cities those ...


10

The primary mechanisms that motivated the industrial revolution were automation and efficient utilization of natural resources to generate power to drive automation. There were certainly also social factors, but I'd prefer to focus primarily on the technical, since this seems to offer a clearer path to an answer. The Romans did harness power from gravity (...


10

Not every ancient city survived to modern days. Sometimes (particularly in developed countries) there may be a new city in roughly the same place a matter of coincidence (within the dictates of geography), without an uninterrupted history of habitation between the two. "Spica" (assuming this is the same as Spina) to be specific was abandoned, likely ...


9

One reason may be the size of the city. The Freie Hansestadt Bremen has 661,000 inhabitants (including Bremen and Bremerhaven), Hamburg has 1.7 million inhabitants. Lübeck has only 213,000 inhabitants. There are also discussions to merge Bremen with Niedersachsen because of the size. So it would be strange if there would be a new smaller Bundesland. Maybe ...


9

Everyone is missing some fundemental preconditions of industrialization. Namely, there needs to be a large class of people who must purchase the consumer goods and must sell their labor to survive. This is the basis of production and of demand. We got a working class in England first because England, by early modern times, was a mostly yeoman (small farmer)...


9

For Europe, I would say, that most of the major cities were not designed to make urban combat more of a mess than it already is. Most of the original European cities were not planned at all but simply envolved as needed This lead to very unsanitary, fire prone, death traps. Fortified cities, as allready meantioned, did have a military plan in mind for ...


9

For central Europe, between 1925-1930 may be considered realistic. For France possibly sooner due to a higher motorized density between 1920 and 1930. The transition was uneven due to certain conditions commercial was faster than private motorised vehicles but the private use was probably a much smaller percentage than commercial, so in a city a ...


9

Because in many cases, as here (see below), the complex is built to within an inch or two of the property line. Why you ask? A few reasons: Zoning allows it. Property value is a sum of the value of three things: a. the building; b. the lot green space; and c. the lot built-up space. When value of the building is, or is expected soon to be, much greater ...


8

The answer by Alex is totally correct. The bicycles were used almost exclusively for recreation, mostly by children and teenagers. There were no bicycle roads so people used them mostly in parks. There were also no bicycle locks available so one could not leave a bicycle at a supermarket or school entrance. It was also difficult to take a bicycle to the ...


8

Streets in East Germany are as wide as they are because the GDR was modern. More modern than West Germany. "Modern" here is an architectural term, not an evaluation of any proclaimed state ideology. Socialist city planning is mainly influenced by modernism and that was a global trend. Streets in the GDR are also not that wide, if you compare them to either ...


7

The very George Washington's surname suggests that his ancestors originated from a similarly called place in England.


7

I believe many did. Hopewell (mound builders) : This Hopewell mound in Newark Ohio looks an awe-full lot like a circular wall with a gate in the upper left hand corner. regarding the Inca, these look like defensive walls to me.


7

Geographically, the US Pacific Northwest is defined by two main factors: Very rugged terrain directly against the coast. This makes getting around difficult, and puts navigable waterways at a premium. The Columbia River. The largest and most important river system in the region. It drains an area larger than the entire country of France, including parts of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible