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110

To pick just one notorious example, 99 years ago to the day, black people's homes were heavily looted by whites in the Tulsa riots of 1921. As this article describes, at least 65 looters were arrested. In addition to taking basic goods like sacks of flour, they opened up safes in people's homes to take gold and silver. EDIT, July 2020: I should have made ...


49

General observations on early urban policing In 1800, only four cities in the US had populations of around 25,000 or more - the largest of these was New York with 60,000 (the others were Philadelphia, Baltimore and Boston) - so the challenges of policing in the US up to the early 1800s were much less than in the major cities of Europe where London was just ...


44

Yes. In San Francisco, 1849, a gang called the "Hounds" looted and destroyed residences in the district of Little Chile: "The Chileans in large numbers are living in tents on the outskirts of town. About 10 o'clock at night the Hounds made an assault upon them, tore down more than a dozen of their tents, broke open their chests, stole their money, tore ...


15

Crime investigation was minimal, particularly because forensic science was non-existent or very crude. No fingerprinting. No autopsies to determine cause of death. No investigation of the crime scene for subtle clues like hairs or carpet pieces. They might use superstitions as well. It was a common practice as late as colonial Massachusetts to force a ...


9

Because in many cases, as here (see below), the complex is built to within an inch or two of the property line. Why you ask? A few reasons: Zoning allows it. Property value is a sum of the value of three things: a. the building; b. the lot green space; and c. the lot built-up space. When value of the building is, or is expected soon to be, much greater ...


7

The question is based on false premises: The Eastern European Plain is often claimed as the homeland of the Proto-Indo-Europeans. If this is where the seeds of European civilisation were first sown, why did it take so long to found cities here? The Proto-Indo-Europeans, whereever they lived, did not sow the seeds of European civilization, they sowed the ...


7

It is an effect of closed perimeter block development. The address 'Arendalsgata No 3: Sagene working class society' looks like this from above: Orientation is the same as in the photo in question, so the building we want is in the lower right. The buildings to the left of that 'empty' edge with the small shed/garage are of a very different and later, post-...


5

In the USA, in the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, there are vast regions containing what are called "row houses", houses built touching their neighbors on either side, extending for many square miles. I lived for most of my childhood in a "duplex" house, which had a side yard on one side connecting the front and back yards, and on ...


4

Geography and technology. The conditions to support large cities were not possible with the technology of the day. Climatic conditions generally favor agriculture in warm, oceanic climates with mild winters for early civilizations (more food variety, higher yield). Cooler periods hit places in the far north harder than the Mediterranean. The early rise of ...


2

Medieval Venice operated internally as more of an Oligarchy, as descent from a noble family was required for membership in its legislative body, which was also the body that selected the Doge. However, nearly all its neighbors were operating under Feudal systems, so when necessary for the purposes of interacting with them, the Doge was roughly reckoned as a ...


2

As far as I know, Spina is at 44.6943°N 12.10256°E. See my www.AncientPortsAntiques.com


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