18

In 1700, the population of the British North American colonies was concentrated mainly along the coast. Roads were terrible and dangerous, and most people would have used the natural highways, the rivers and estuaries that came in from the coast . The estuaries were navigable all the way to the Fall Line, which allowed navigation well into the interior. ...


18

Adding to what @Alex said "typical" lobsters (i.e., the lobsters that humans eat and the ones that turn red when you cook them) don't even extend as far south as Hispaniola. They are a cold-water species and based on available range data for H. americanus don't even extend southward of North Carolina. Distribution of American lobster (Homerus ...


15

It's important to note here a key distinction between British (army) officers and Continental officers. The former, overwhelmingly, had purchased their commissions into a specific regiment; and were required to purchase their promotions (usually within the regiment) as vacancies occurred which they were eligible for. The latter were, largely if not ...


11

Let's address the easy issue first. At the time of the Colombian Exchange, the Germ Theory of disease was still about 300 years in the future (and its acceptance more than 400). An educated European of the age most likely would have attributed the natives' susceptibility to Smallpox to their own living conditions, because that's how the prevailing miasma ...


11

In the case of Washington, at least, things were a bit complicated, because of the time and place. Daniel Parke Custis was the first husband of Martha Dandridge, later Martha Washington. It was this woman who inherited Daniel Custis' estate when he died and she became a widow. In the 18th century, when an American woman married or remarrried, her property &...


7

I wasn't intending to write an answer here - but my comments got out of hand: Two things to remember on feeder service: A 10 mile walk was literally nothing, just a daily commute; and people were far more likely to ride a horse either owned or borrowed to travel a middling distance. There was unlikely to be any profit in feeder services except in high ...


7

US Highway 1 What is now known as US Highway 1 might be a viable route. According to a 1927 report from the US Department of Agriculture, republished by the US Federal Highway Administration, Although the present improved condition of the road is the result of no more than thirty years of intensive work by the highway departments of the several States and ...


6

In your timeframe there should have been routes from Charleston/Savannah to Boston/New York. The time of day would be based on the tide. A ship would leave Charleston when the tide was receding (from high to low, towards the ocean), since the receding water would assist the ships movement (otherwise it would have to fight against the water movement). For ...


5

Both Lawyers. We can start with an article in the October 1865 NEHGR which confirms the dates you give in the question: This does give a little more information, mainly that John died in Baton Rouge. Adding that to a search query brings up another source, General Catalogue of the Officers and Students of the Phillips Exeter Academy, we find all three ...


4

Yes there were certainly - trails, paths - in the early 18th century. These reached far to the West for the purposes of trade - very profitable - with the Indians. A John Mitchell map ca. 1760 shows many of these and gives dates for their use - see Library of Congress, map number ar00401. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.gmd/g3300.ar004401 For example, this map shows ...


3

An article in a book on the History of Macomb County, Michigan from 1882 agrees with your connection to the wampum belt (emphasis mine): There is legend that a beautiful Chippewa girl well known to Gladwyn divulged to him scheme which the Indians had in view namely that the next day Pontiac come to the fort with sixty of his chiefs each armed with a gun ...


3

I very strongly doubt that, growing up in the Caribbean. The type of lobsters found there are neither red nor at all capable of getting out of the water. At most you'll seem skim-walk on sandy bottoms, as they don't really swim either. You'd have to be coming onto a beach in which lots of them congregated in shallow enough water to be seen from topside and ...


2

Most probably this is good old plain racism and motivated reasoning: When 'discovered' by European settlers — in the 18th and early 19th century — such artifacts of the 'mound builders' clearly show some form of 'advanced civilization' and sophistication. So, surely, nothing the barbarous Indians could have ever accomplished. Some European nobleman just must ...


2

Assuming Mr. Salem was a Muslim based only on his last name being derived from the Arabic word “Salaam” (various versions of which mean peace in modern Arabic and Hebrew) is very weak tea. The words origins are proto-Semitic meaning it predates Hebrew, Arabic, Aramaic languages and the Jewish, Islamic, and Christian faiths). This, therefore, would hardly be ...


1

The Sante Fe trail was first used in 1739, though an earlier attempt to blaze the trail was made by the French in 1719. This is slightly later than the stated time and is traveling away from the Colonies rather than within them, though it may be a good example of a type of trade route. It was 900 miles of traveling over plains from landmark to landmark. ...


1

The pilgrims had a particular situation and were in a particular world, compared to today's globalized world: The pilgrims were English. There were often wars between England, the Netherlands, France and Spain: so English pilgrims were not sure of being well received in colonies of those countries. The pilgrims only had a different religion, and they were ...


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