44

The difference is that while Kosovo broke away from a country which had tried to exterminate its inhabitants, the slave states broke away so that they could continue to enslave some of their inhabitants. As some repondents have pointed out, whether a breakaway or revolutionary state is considered legitimate depends on only whether foreign countries are ...


25

'Precedent' is a more or less meaningless word in international relations. Don't make the mistake of thinking that international relations are governed by any kind of set rules or that international law is like law in any meaningful sense. Countries - some countries - may subscribe to international law, but that essentially amounts to mutual voluntary ...


9

The precedent the article talks about is that Kosovo was recognized as an independent state by major powers very soon. No country ever recognized the Confederacy as an independent country.


8

Let's be clear about what happened with regards to Kosovo. In 2010 the International Court of Justice issued an advisory opinion at the request of the United Nations General Assembly. The key conclusion of this opinion was that "international law contains no 'prohibition on declarations of independence'." This is not based on any historical precedent, just ...


7

Political power grows out of the barrel of a gun When NATO (led by US) started intervention against Federal Republic of Yugoslavia in 1999, they simply had no equal match in firepower and economic power, especially in that part of the world (SE Europe) . Although many countries and individuals doubted their reasoning and causes for war (and those doubts are ...


4

Mark Johnson answered already (correctly) that Confederate Money has no value, but individual banknotes and coins (and bonds) can have value as collectors' items. This is, however, not due to Federal Authorities IGNORING Confederate Bonds or other claims - a coin or bill is also a claim against the issuer to accept it as payment. On the contrary, they made ...


3

The question, as asked, has no objective answer. The collector value of a Confederate banknote is not fixed by anything, and I doubt it is particularly consistent during any given year. Going from the general behaviour of collectables with no intrinsic utility, the price will depend very strongly on condition, quite probably varying by a factor of ten or ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible