99

Strong contenders would likely include the deadlier major WW1 battlefields (Passchendaele, Verdun, Somme, etc.) - they were more spread out than a single square mile, but the amount of casualties in them was record setting. Auschwitz-Birkenau (~1.1M deaths) and Treblinka (~700-900k deaths) are also worth a reference, with the latter "beating" the former in ...


96

The square mile around the Colosseum in Rome seems a likely candidate for most deaths using conventional weapons. Within a mile of the Colosseum were the Circus Maximus and the Roman Forum where there were also thousands of deaths. As most of these deaths occurred during the Roman Republic and Empire, the most commonly used weapons would have been knives/...


33

(1) "The Battle of France" - so called by the French. The the term "Battle of France is widely used for the WW2 fighting of the French against the German invasion. See e.g. Wikipedia Battle of France And the naming of it accordingly is attested to e.g. Winston Churchill: here ... What General Weygand has called The Battle of France is over. The ...


27

We can't be sure The much lower population and population density of antiquity means that the least documented parts of history probably aren't in the running. There have been (Fermi estimate) about 100 billion humans all told. Pace the nonsense taught to mid-20th century anthropologists, hunter–gatherer societies live in states of constant war with ...


25

Some square mile of The Somme, probably around some WWI strongpoint. While it's impossible to determine how many casualties happened at any particular square mile of the Somme, the concentration of so many military casualties in such a small area is something the world had never seen, and never saw again. Note: "causalities" includes all "rendered unfit ...


23

The Austro-Prussian War is currently known in Germany as "Deutscher Krieg", or "The German War" - though it was originally known as "Preußisch-Deutscher Krieg", or "Prussian-German War". Another contender are the Napoleonic Wars--or the Guerres napoléoniennes, as they are called in France.


20

I can think of an example of this from the ancient period: The Lamian War(323–322 BC): was known to the ancient Greeks as the "Hellenic War". Obviously there were many wars in ancient Greece that we could call "Hellenic Wars" but this particular one was explicitly noted by Diodorus Siculus as such. Independent Greek states fought on both sides of this war:...


13

One potential answer is "The People's Crusade." This certainly refers to the people fighting it (peasants instead of noblemen). I haven't found any primary source material for contemporaries calling it "The People's Crusade", but this source seems to suggest that it was called "The Popular Crusade" which is fairly close. As two sheds and Steve Jessop ...


12

An incident leading to the First Opium War comes to mind. The setting is China in the late 1700s. European traders want free trade with China, but China has restricted them to a single port: Canton. Long story short, the British wanted Chinese tea, lots and lots of tea! This meant a lot of British hard currency was going to China in exchange for their tea. ...


12

First of all, seeing as to how more than one SE user has questioned the seriousness of the Cuban missile crisis, let me try to outline how tense things were at the time. The Cuban missile crisis is the only time ever that any section of the US military has mobilised to DEFCON 2. The erstwhile SAC was at DEFCON 2 while the rest of the armed forces were at ...


11

Naming a war after the leader of our side (especially if he wants to be remembered for the victory, even anticipated) like in "Napoleonic Wars" as referenced by two sheds seems to be the most natural case of naming the war after one's side. In Clone Wars it's a different case: naming the war after a key or new weapon. I don't know about any war named like ...


11

In 2002, the leader of the Palestinian Authority Yasser Arafat said he would accept the Taba agreement in the terms put forward by President Bill Clinton 18 months earlier. Back in January 2001, the Taba summit had reached an impasse when both (Israeli and Palestinian) negociation teams still had reservations while Clinton had to quit the White House and ...


10

Tokyo Simply because Tokyo hast the highest population density of any industrial city with more than 100,000 inhabitants per square mile during the Second World War, the air raids on Tokyo might have placed the bloodiest square mile caused by conventional warfare in this area. The firebombing raid in the night of 9/10 March 1945 alone caused approximately ...


8

Hmm... Perhaps the War of the League of Augsburg / War of the Grand Alliance / Nine Years' War would count, at least with respect to the first two of those names. According to Wikipedia, The Grand Alliance was a European coalition, consisting (at various times) of Austria, Bavaria, Brandenburg, the Dutch Republic, England, the Holy Roman Empire, Ireland, ...


7

In almost every war, most deaths occur not in the major battles. In the Pacific war that you refer to most US death occurred from mines, bad weather conditions, accidents and diseases. Also the Japanese lost more ships to mines than in combat. This is a general pattern in all armed conflicts.


7

The length of time in which you have to bury someone for practical reasons is mainly affected by temperature. You can see this by looking at different cultures, where waiting a week or more may be OK for a Russian but in Muslim culture (from the Middle East) one day is the limit. Some rain forest tribes don't even take a body back to village - they literally ...


6

Buddhism predates Christianity and some believe some of the ideas of Buddhism traveled along the Silk Road and reached the Middle East. They may have influenced thought in that area in the years before the appearance of Christianity. Buddhism, although some would argue it’s not a religion, does promote peaceful co-existence. The five precepts are: To ...


5

One example that comes to my mind is the War of the Triple Alliance, perhaps more commonly known as the Paraguayan War, which was won by the said Triple Alliance (Brazil, Argentina and Uruguay). EDIT – But to be honest, I don't actually know nor could I find out whether it was called like that while it was being fought; it's pretty probable that it was ...


4

Winston Churchill, before fighting it: "The battle of Britain is about to begin. Upon this battle depends the survival of Christian civilisation."


4

I think that Wikipedia article has an adequate description of the Oslo accord. The main point was the mutual recognition between Israel and PLA, a promise of PLA to stop violence against Israel, and withdrawal of Israeli troops from the West Bank and Gaza. This also implied that Israeli settlements had to be removed. Some people on both sides were against ...


4

Posting as an answer because I can't post a comment: This is an absolutely terrible question that should be closed. It is far too open-ended as it asks for a list of undefined extent. It clearly violates both of these items in the FAQ: Chatty, open-ended questions diminish the usefulness of our site and push other questions off the front page. Your ...


3

Surely an obvious example is the American Revolution? And likewise for many other revolutions.


3

Oslo was Israel recognising that Palestinians have some rights that the PLO were entitled to negotiate for them, agreeing for the Palestinian Authority to be set up and giving it some autonomy and control over parts of the west bank. The Palestinians recognised Israel and the 1967 borders while agreeing to negotiate a permanent border. Basically both sides ...


2

At least two other answers have mentioned that the French refer to the Napoleonic wars by the name of their leader, but miss that they are also referred to (in English) by the faction the British were in. The War of the First Coalition, The War of the Second Coalition, all the way through The War of the Seventh Coalition.


2

two sheds already mentioned the Napoleonic Wars, which do kinda qualify(they're named after the leader of the country), AND The French Revolutionary wars(guerres de la Révolution française in French) are a perfect example for what you're asking. They're named after the... we can say faction or political entity, that caused and won most of them, and are ...


2

Wow. This is effectively asking, "please give an example of violence in History". You'd be hard-pressed to find any example of religious violence that didn't have some kind of cultural-ethnic underpinning. One of my favorite examples is Arianism. This was a difference with the Pope in Rome over the precise nature of the Holy Trinity which even most devout ...


2

It is impossible to answer this question beyond personal opinion, so it is a question best tackled by describing the considerations for answering it first. The substantial problem is that the bulk of history from the birth of Homo sapiens to now is lost – if not completely (pre-history), then for the detail of the events and the veracity of the accounts (...


2

People usually do not leave suitable land for another, unless they are forced to, so we should be looking at places that were barely suitable and became worse to begin with. The closest example could probably be Greenland: in the Middle Ages the Nordmen did stablish some colonies there but those could not be maintained due to climate change and had to be ...


2

Simplifying greatly, Imperial Russia conquered the Crimean Khanate in the 1780s and settled the peninsula. In 1954 Crimea became part of the Ukranian SSR; it stayed Ukranian after the breakup of the Soviet Union. In 2014, Russia took it back. (This answer deliberately skips over lots of details about Tatar interests, Cossack incursions, national languages, ...


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