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4

Sorry to say that, but the currently best answer on this seems to be only: "we also have not been able to locate it by searching the net". To conclude from that that it doesn't exist in the papal archives or other books not digitized –– seems a bit premature? The question comes in three interrelated but distinct parts: ––# 1. Did Urban issue a bull of ...


4

TED above has answered very successfully, I just complement. I refer to my previous answer, to state that the Crusades had amply justification without any concept of Terra Nullius. Was there the idea of "peaceful Crusades"? And the Iberians had a lot of dealings with the Muslim polities. Besides that, Muslims were not the only non-Christians ...


12

Short answer Pope Urban II issued no such bull for the First Crusade. The source which first made this claim, possibly Pramod K. Nayar, in 'The Postcolonial Studies Dictionary', appears to have falsely assumed that Urban II's speech at the Council of Clermont in November 1095 was a papal bull (it wasn't), and then retroactively applied the much more recent ...


5

I doubt the first words of the bull were "terra nullius," as that term has a general meaning in international law as "land that is legally unoccupied or uninhabited." Pope Urban II's acts in 1095 are listed in Jaffé's Regesta pontificum romanorum (vol. 2) pp. 676-684. Jaffé p. 688 does say the following, under 12 July 1096: In eodem concilio de liberanda ...


45

It seems likely this is a historical myth. According to WikiPedia's list of Papal Bulls*, Urban II did issue a bull that year, but it had to do with who was allowed to excommunicate the ruler of the Kingdom of Aragon. I can't find a link to the text online either, so it seems possible other topics were dealt with, but that one's so different it seems ...


38

The Middle Ages was not particularly known for being a civil and orderly period. Leopold V had no authority of any kind to arrest Richard I. He did it simply because he wanted to, and could. The illegality of the act is reflected by the fact that it drew official sanction from the Church: Pope Celestine III excommunicated Leopold, and compelled him to ...


10

Politics, collaboration and trust dictated the routes of the armies to the Holy Land during the crusades. Each crusade is different from the others, with different participants, different nations, different objectives, different interests, different periods and different geopolitical situations. The routes to reach the holy land were studied carefully and ...


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