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100

Strong contenders would likely include the deadlier major WW1 battlefields (Passchendaele, Verdun, Somme, etc.) - they were more spread out than a single square mile, but the amount of casualties in them was record setting. Auschwitz-Birkenau (~1.1M deaths) and Treblinka (~700-900k deaths) are also worth a reference, with the latter "beating" the former in ...


100

The square mile around the Colosseum in Rome seems a likely candidate for most deaths using conventional weapons. Within a mile of the Colosseum were the Circus Maximus and the Roman Forum where there were also thousands of deaths. As most of these deaths occurred during the Roman Republic and Empire, the most commonly used weapons would have been knives/...


46

The actual year would be in prehistory, when the human population were more concentrated. In terms of recorded history, the initial outbreak of the Plague of Justinian in 541 had an estimated death toll of 25 million. Most estimates of world population gives about ~200 million for the 6th century. The plague thus killed roughly 10-13% of the global ...


32

70,000 BC Analysis of the human genome has suggested that there was a choke-point in human history where the number of humans was drastically reduced. Some believe that this was due to a single volcanic eruption occurring 70,000 years ago give or take. According to this theory human population may have been reduced to just a few thousand breeding pairs. ...


29

The usual explanation is that Japanese culture believed the soul resides in the abdomen. Since the ritual of seppuku or harakiri is usually meant to provide an honourable death, cutting open the abdomen was an act that "bares the soul", so to speak. The Meiji educator Dr. Nitobe Inazō wrote in his famous Bushido: the Soul of Japan that: [T]he choice of ...


28

According to this article the ratio rose from 1.10 to about 1.54 (ratio of men/women fell from 0.91 to about 0.65) between 1941 and 1946 in the draft-age group (people born around 1887 to 1927), which was the most affected by the war losses. Other age groups were less affected, so I'd say that the overall ratio would be around 1.3-1.25 (0.75-0.8 men/women)....


28

We can't be sure The much lower population and population density of antiquity means that the least documented parts of history probably aren't in the running. There have been (Fermi estimate) about 100 billion humans all told. Pace the nonsense taught to mid-20th century anthropologists, hunter–gatherer societies live in states of constant war with more ...


28

The answer to your question "is there any historical documentation which could lend support to this theory?" would be no. The entire story was based on forged documents planted at the UK National Archives. This was uncovered by an internal investigation carried out by the National archives, the results of which were made public back in 2006. As the ...


27

A bit of quick research tells me the worst in absolute terms almost has to be 1918. There was a worldwide influenza epidemic that killed about 40 million people that year. That's the single biggest recorded death toll for a global pandemic in a single year in human history1. There also happened to be one of the bloodiest wars in human history (in terms of ...


25

Some square mile of The Somme, probably around some WWI strongpoint. While it's impossible to determine how many casualties happened at any particular square mile of the Somme, the concentration of so many military casualties in such a small area is something the world had never seen, and never saw again. Note: "causalities" includes all "rendered unfit ...


20

The 1976 date appears to be a transcription error. Not only is the 1970 date more frequent in English literature, the two Russian language sources below (that appear to be independent) agree on a death date of June 12, 1970. Great Chemists - BELOUSOV Boris Pavlovich https://elementy.ru/nauchno-populyarnaya_biblioteka/434667/Boris_Belousov Numerous other ...


18

They didn't end up in any one particular place. In more recent decades, discovered skulls are generally returned to Japan, or disposed of in various ways (lack of identification). Certainly at least some would have been gotten rid of (through burial or otherwise) since WW2 was still ongoing. American authorities did not officially approve of the practise. ...


17

The Soviet population in 1941 was 196,716,000. In 1946, it was 170,548,000.[1] That's a difference of 26,168,000 people. According to a study published by the Russian Academy of Science[2], there were 12,300,000 births and 11,900,000 natural deaths during war, so the populational decrease must be entirely attributed to war deaths. Considering 400,000 births ...


14

This is a common misconception, cremation was not universal in ancient Greece. The Greeks had various funerary customs, that depended not only on local practices and customs but also on the social status of the deceased. Cremation was fairly common, however that doesn't mean that burial wasn't. In fact the more common practice in post Mycenaean times was ...


12

It is a Portate Cross, also called cross of St. Gilbert. There were some pages which stated that "portate" derives from Latin "portare" (carry), and that it symbolizes the cross Christ carried, but I found no reliable source to support it.


11

It's a common misconception that knights in full armor couldn't get up when they fell down. In real life they could, without much difficulty. Jumping and running was also not a problem. The could mount a horse without assistance, and run short distances. Good armour fits the body well, all over. The weight was evenly distributed. If a knight fell in the ...


11

There were quite a few different reactions, and panic was probably the main one. People didn't understand much about disease in those days so some of what they did wouldn't make much sense to us today. Here's one reaction before the plague came to England - yes, people knew it was coming: By June 1348, the plague was in Paris, but the fear of it ...


11

The Catacombs of Paris contain the remains of more than 6 million people, and much like the San Francisco situation the catacombs were established to alleviate overflowing cemeteries throughout Paris. These catacombs were built using defunct mines and quarries spread out underneath Paris, and millions of remains were moved there from cemeteries across the ...


11

Given that the question asks specifically for conventional weapons (so ruling out Hiroshima and Nagasaki), and is now limited to a 24 hour period in history, you are probably looking at Operation Meetinghouse where 279 B-29 bombers dropped 1,665 tons of bombs on Tokyo on the night of 9–10 March, 1945. Approximately 100,000 people were killed. The bombs ...


10

Henry I, the 3rd norman King of England, died after eating a surfeit of lampreys after going on a hunting trip while ill. Apparently eating them was against the advice of his physician. Lampreys were pretty common fare in Early Medieval Britain but are pretty gross eel-like fish that still happily inhabit English rivers today. It is likely that they weren't ...


9

Only the Upper Class was given the honour of execution by beheading - for commoners hanging and burning at the stake were used instead. Consequently beheadings were infrequent, and the executioner often inexperienced. A swift beheading required a calm sure swing, and the custom of having the condemned prisoner both forgive and pay the executioner was ...


9

It's hard in history to prove that something did not happen, which is along the lines of the "impossible to prove a negative" concept. However, I think most historians do not believe Lenin was poisoned. This article is a nice and quick write-up of the issues Lenin dealt with, which included infections and an assassination attempt. Beyond being a ...


9

This question is addressed in this article: Tragedy of the lost generation It concludes that Durham had the highest percentage loss, with 6353 dead representing nearly 8% of the city's population.


8

Long story short, yes, he did. He was for a brief time military counsellor for the sultan of Ternate (around 1512). Ternate lies on longitude 127 East.


8

Those who were killed in battle were indeed generally buried on the spot. Many of those temporary burials remain lost to this day, and the names of the fallen are recorded on monuments erected near the battlefields. The 4,700 Indian soldiers and labourers who lost their lives on the Western Front during the First World War and have no known grave are ...


7

There was a general statement by Andrew Jackson that could have referred to his Vice-President John C. Calhoun. "Do not be deceived by names. Disunion by armed force is treason... I will hang the first man of them I can get my hands on, on the first tree I find." This was said to a bunch of South Carolinans, of which Calhoun was one. They looked at each ...


7

In almost every war, most deaths occur not in the major battles. In the Pacific war that you refer to most US death occurred from mines, bad weather conditions, accidents and diseases. Also the Japanese lost more ships to mines than in combat. This is a general pattern in all armed conflicts.


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