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86

The Wikipedia article on this is quite detailed. In short, Germany was never conquered by the Roman Empire, so several tribes maintained their identity as well as the Germanic language. On top of that, you have Germany's central location, out of all those factors the different names emerged based on mostly 5 different origins. Deutsch - from the Germanic ...


34

There is a text written by Luther called "an den christlichen Adel deutscher Nation" (exact spelling!). So the word "deutsch" is very old. However, even from the 1848 revolution on (short-living foundation of a German Democracy that was supposed to overcome the small monarchies ("Kleinstaaten")) or from 1871 on (Foundation of the 2nd Reich), Germans didn't ...


27

The name comes from the Alemanni, a Germanic tribe. Germany is known by a variety of names throughout the world, you can find a comprehensive list on Wikipedia: Names of Germany. See also: Is there a reason why Germany (Deutschland) is called so many different things in other European languages? (German Language Stack Exchange)


26

The Byzantine empire was a continuation of the older Roman empire in the East but it was gradually transformed into a different political entity. Meaning: The original Roman empire used Latin as an official language, as expected, while Byzantium was Greek-speaking They basically inherited the Roman legal system from the Roman empire. They considered ...


25

You are right, the name Hellenes means “pagans” in the New Testament, and was consequently abandoned by Greek Christians, who preferred to call themselves “Romans”. The term Hellene was revived by the Greek philosopher Giorgios Gemistos Plethon in the 15th century as part of his endeavour to replace Christianity by the “Religion of the Hellenes”. It was ...


14

Just a hint, according to Greek wikipedia entry (which cites this book), the Patriarch wrote Ῥωμαῖοι - Rhōmaîoi in the letter.: Οι δύο δυνάμεις ολόκληρου του σύμπαντος, η δύναμη των Σαρακηνών και αυτή των Ρωμαίων, ξεχωρίζουν και ακτινοβολούν όπως τα δύο μεγάλα φωτεινά σώματα του ουράνιου θόλου. Γι'αυτόν και μόνο τον λόγο θα πρέπει να ζήσουμε μαζί ...


13

There is a Wikipedia article on the topic, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_of_Germany Because of Germany's geographic position in the centre of Europe, as well as its long history as a non-united region of distinct tribes and states, there are many widely varying names of Germany in different languages, perhaps more so than for any other European ...


13

Why Germany is known in world in a diverse way? I believe this has to do with different nature of encountering Germans when it came to other nations. Germany has a more important strategic location than France does. France is in the Western most reach of the Continent while Germany is in the center and had more dealings with Slavs in the East, Latins in ...


9

Simpler answer: the Roman Empire centered in Constantinople was always the Roman Empire and the Greek-speaking Roman Christians continued to refer to themselves as Romans even during Ottoman rule (and indeed the Ottomans referred to them this way as well). "Greek" was the name of the language and the name of the ancient people that the Romans conquered. ...


8

The word Deutsch itself has deep roots. The name Dutch is a cognate. If you're willing to reach way back, the word's ancestry can be traces to the proto-Indo-European word tewtéh [1] meaning people, tribe or the ruler of a tribe. Its English cousin would be the word thede, also meaning people or kinfolk. In Irish Gaelic you can find 'tuath,' with the same ...


7

The term has evolved gradually, with the root phrase being listed in Wikipedia: Theodiscus is a Medieval Latin term literally meaning "popular" or "of the people". Later in the same entry it states: However, in German, the use of the term referring to Germans specifically as opposed to people speaking Germanic languages in general evolves during ...


6

I am not a historian, but here's what I've found from a cursory look at the literature. There's Pre-Aksumite, but that demonym isn't exclusive to D'MT. From "Punt and Aksum: Egypt and the Horn of Africa.": There are extensive remains of a Pre-Aksumite culture (that is, the kingdom of D'MT in particular) in the area surrounding Aksum, although little ...


5

German.Stackexchange: Is there a reason why Germany (Deutschland) is called so many different things in other European languages? English.Stackexchange: Why does Germany's English name differ from its German name? History.Stackexchange: Why do some countries call Germany "Alman" too? Wikipedia: Names of Germany Because of Germany's geographic ...


5

The term must definitely have been in common use by 1863, at the very latest, as it is used in the inscription on the floor of the Hall of Liberation. There, it was still spelled Teutsche, however.


4

The Greek state aggressively promoted a Hellenic identity for Greeks since independence, but the Romaic identity, looking to Byzantium rather than Antiquity, and to Orthodox Christianity and folk culture rather than the Enlightenment and high culture, persisted, and served as a rallying point for cultural debate well into the 20th century. And Greek ...


3

To add to @Yannis Rizos's post, what has come down to us as the Germanic tribal name Alemanni is actually the Latin name for what that tribe called itself. The tribe called itself the High Germanic equivalent of the modern German "alle männer", or "all men"/"all mankind", because they themselves were all the people they usually referred to. The Romans ...


3

I am a german student and the theme in history last semester was the founding of Germany. In the war against France, before 1871 students and poets started saying that we the Germans have to fight together against France (they wore black, red and gold which became the colors of the flag). This was the time when most people called themselves German. Before ...


2

The answer by @8odoros cites Nikolaos Mystikos in Modern Greek. This is the original text, which likewise uses "Romans" as the term rendered in English as "Byzantines": Ὅτι δύο κυριότητες πάσης τῆς ἐν γῇ κυριότητος, ἥ τε τῶν Σαρακηνῶν καὶ ἡ τῶν Ῥωμαίων, ὑπερανέχουσι καὶ διαλάμπουσιν, ὥσπερ οἱ δύο μεγάλοι ἐν τῷ στερεώματι φωστῆρες, καὶ δεῖ κατ’ αὐτό γε τοῦτο ...


2

I am from Iran. In Persian language, many words related to Europe are obtained from French language. In Iran we call Germany Alman just because this is the way it is pronounced in French. The first waves of Iranian students in Europe studied in France universities. Also, notice that previously French language was more international than English.


2

In Portugal it is called "Alemanha", not "Alman". It is that way because of the tribe living in that region of Europe, "Álamos" Source: I'm Portuguese.


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