43

An interesting analysis on this question was brought up by Jared Diamond author of "Guns, Germs and Steel" and I believe it is a more accurate answer to the question than that offered by Lennart Regebro (no offense intended to that author!). While Regebro is certainly true in explaining major factors to the continuation of many African nations relative ...


15

The question is still a little bit fuzzy, but I think its due to not understanding what drove trade in the pre-industrial era, so I'm just going to get into that. The basic consideration here is transport. Prior to the invention of the railroad, shipping over water was vastly more efficient than doing it any other way. So back then it was almost more ...


7

Naming When an epoch ends, the intellectual leaders of the new epoch name the one that just ended (this is a general observation, cf Early modern vs late modern vs post modern?). E.g., Khrushchev called Stalin's years "personality cult", Brezhnev called Khrushchev years "voluntarism", and Gorbachev called Brezhnev's years "stagnation" ("застой"). The ...


6

Presumably this had to do with the Save the Bay movement that started in the early sixties. This movement was a backlash against the filling that had happened up unto that point: While Reber’s plan never broke ground, many others did and by 1961, the Bay was a third smaller than it was a little more than a century before. The particular trigger was a ...


5

Question: Why are the historical large cities in the southern US not the large cities in the South today? Antebellum South: Charleston, Richmond, Savannah, and New Orleans Post-bellum South: Atlanta, Charlotte, Miami, and Houston Short Answer: What really changed in the post-bellum south was ...


4

This is discussed in great detail by Jared Diamon's book Guns, Germs, and Steel and boils down to a few ideas: Firstly, Eurasia is horizontal. Plants and animals adapted to the climate of one place can flourish anywhere east or west of the origin point. This made it easy to spread domesticated animals and plants. By comparison, Africa is vertical, and also ...


3

Why not include North and South Americans and the South Pacific in this same comparison, because they all fell victim to European colonization... There are many reasons.... Why did one group of people develop faster than the other? It had to do with Geographic Advantages enjoyed by Eurasia, and all the waterfall of advantages which came with those ...


3

Consider a typical day of a Soviet white-collar worker at the time. The 1970s, Moscow. In the morning you go to the office. There you do not work, but just chat with your colleagues. You discuss some news or personal stories. Somebody tells about a relative who just returned from abroad and what things he/she brought back. Then one woman says she forgot to ...


3

In 1955 the State Assembly passed AB3806, creating the Hunters Point Reclamation District. According to G.R. Dow's thesis "Bay Fill in San Francisco", the City government was bullish on locating a new wholesale produce terminal at South Basin and the Board of Supervisors passed some measures for this project (Dow cites 1955/1573, 1957/1999, and 1963/1273). ...


2

As pointed out in the comments by T.E.D. this answer given to the question 'Why are many African nations poor?' explains well the beginnings of developmental differences in Africa and Eurasia. BrotherJack wrote: An interesting analysis on this question was brought up by Jared Diamond author of "Guns, Germs and Steel" and I believe it is a more accurate ...


2

Most African nations became independent around 1950-1965. That is almost 70 years ago. Blaming all problems on colonial powers who left them to fence for themselves is a pretty weak argument by now. At the same time Asian countries became independent and they've done a whole lot better. Add to that the almost limitless development aid western nations supply. ...


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