18

According to one of his letters to his wife Bess, Truman noticed that Stalin liked Chopin's music very much, especially the version played by the American pianist at Potsdam. And Chopin was also one of Truman's favorite composers (alongside German composers that Stalin would not have liked). And Truman wanted "both of them in it" (the war with Japan). ...


18

from Australia's War 1939 - 1945: On 3 September 1939, Prime Minister Robert Gordon Menzies announced that Australia was at war with Germany: "Fellow Australians, it is my melancholy duty to inform you officially, that in consequence of a persistence by Germany in her invasion of Poland, Great Britain has declared war upon her and that, as a result, ...


14

Well, by Nixon's own standard, his implementation of it certainly wasn't very effective. As quoted by his chief of staff: I call it the Madman Theory, Bob. I want the North Vietnamese to believe I've reached the point where I might do anything to stop the war. We'll just slip the word to them that, "for God's sake, you know Nixon is obsessed about ...


13

This does seem to be confirmed via several sources. The book Harry S. Truman: His Life and Times By Brian Burnes mentions Truman's music on page 14, where after Eugene List had played, it says "Then Truman himself took a turn at the keyboard" Other sources discussing this include: Presidential Anecdotes By Paul F. Boller, on pg 287 mentions Truman ...


12

The ambassador most likely left Poland for Romania by about noon on Sept. 17, 1939, within a few hours of the Soviet invasion that morning, having already left Warsaw for Kuty in preparation for just such action. From the House of Commons Hansard records for Sept. 20, 1939 - Columns 976-7 (my emphasis): War Situation 3.52 p.m. .... The Prime Minister (Mr....


9

If it was common to have priests at high positions the court, then it was also common to have priests traveling in behalf of the King. Cardinal Wolsey He travelled to Scotland. I also think he traveled some times to deal with organizing the Field of the Cloth of Gold (or at least he traveled there and worked during the encounter). He may also have traveled ...


9

Although I am late to the party since there is no accepted answer I will try to give mine. There are two cases I can think that might answer the question. In ancient Greek city-states there were proxenoi. They were citizens of their respective city, but had friendly relations with another city-state and fulfilled some of the functions that are today in an ...


8

As noted in Alan G. Jamieson's Lords of the Sea: A History of the Barbary Corsairs and confirmed here the truce of 1580 simply called an end to the fighting between the Spanish and Ottoman Empires that never resumed. There were never any official peace talks, and so no formal agreement on territorial concessions was ever negotiated. The Ottomans were ...


5

Economy, ideology and foreign policy First a little background : when China emerged from civil war (and long years of Japanese occupation) in 1949, it was backward and undeveloped agricultural country. Chinese communist requested and got help from USSR, but this of course left China as second fiddle in communist world. Chinese leaders and especially Mao were ...


5

A nice case might be Talleyrand. He was a Catholic bishop while working first for the Directory and later on for Napoleon as Minister of Foreign Affairs. While beign in office he was laicized (because he wanted to get married) and kept working for the crown of France in other diplomatic missions. Talleyrand worked in several missions, including Treaty of ...


5

The question as it currently is is a bit vague. Does executed or imprisoned by non-state actors count? That one is fairly common, some well-known examples are the 2012 Benghazi consulate attack or the kidnapping of four Soviet diplomats in Lebanon in 1985. Wikipedia actually has a list of ambassadors who were killed in office. Most of them were killed by ...


5

I think you are referring to a proposal by Moshe Dayan to Meir in December 1970 that Israel withdraw 20 miles from the Suez Canal in order to aid the Egyptians in reopening the canal and possibly averting their motivation to go to war, according to this article in the Times of Israel. Two months later, Sadat, in a speech to the Egyptian National Assembly ...


4

The Amarna letters and other associated documents indicate the existence of permanent embassies in Egypt in the 14th century BC. As a matter of practicality it has always been the practice to demand hostages among states in tension. For example, one king will send his son to be a hostage in the court of the other king. This son acts as a sort of an embassy. ...


4

The Romans would accept and raise the highborn of allied tribes, hoping to Romanize their future leaders and cement their political and military relationships. Maroboduus was a ward of Augustus. Later, as king of the Marcomanni, he organized a confederation of tribes to defend against Rome. This was also the case with the Germanic Cherusci tribe, which was ...


4

When a foreign dignitary was on a State visit the host was responsible for the security of the visitor. This was guaranteed by providing a military formation to do so and this was usually really inspected by the visitor. Today Americans – for example – do not trust this old tradition and provide their own security (largely). But it is still a part of the ...


3

Not exactly a world war causing event, but fairly recent: in 2014 a Russian diplomat, Dmitri Borodin, was arrested for drunk and disorderly conduct, as well as insulting the police in his house in Scheveningen (part of The Hague) in The Netherlands. The Russian government asked questions, and ordered his release. The Dutch government apologized, and released ...


3

Taken from this web-page: The arrest of Constantin Diamandy, Romania’s plenipotentiary minister in Petrograd, on Lenin’s order. On the evening of December 31, 1917 (January 13, 1918, new style), the plenipotentiary minister of Romania in Petrograd, Constantin Diamandy, and the staff of the Royal Legation of Romania were arrested by the Bolsheviks, under ...


2

Keep in mind that Xi and the CCP have been extremely critical of the way Perestroika unfolded and brought down the USSR. This Chinese dislike of Soviet politics - admitting political issues with any Communist approach - refers all the way back to Khrushchev's denunciation of Stalin's terror in 1953. And it was probably reinforced after 1989 in Tiananmen, ...


2

You may have heard of the "heptarchy" of seven Anglo-Saxon kingdoms. Actually there were about a dozen Anglo-Saxon kingdoms in the year 600, and about five of them were important in Anglo-Saxon history. Some historians have suggested that there might have been hundreds of tiny Anglo-Saxon kingdoms in the 6th century, which merged peacefully or violently to ...


1

Yes, Syria and Egypt merged to one country called United Arab Republic in 1958. They separated again in 1961. There are many earlier examples: England and Scotland merged to United Kingdom (1706). Poland and Lithuania merged in (1569) into the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth.


1

Prior to the early part of the 16th century, that is 1517, there was no religious Catholic Protestant split to speak of. The European Wars of the 16th century mostly centered around the Holy Roman Empire (HRE), the entity that was the one most divided by the Catholic-Protestant split. This would include the modern Netherlands and Belgium, (shaded pink on ...


1

Both. The declaration in 1939 brought Australia, by virtue of its then status as a British dominion, into war with Germany. Adoption of the statute of Westminster terminated Australia's status as a dominion and would have, by itself, resulted in the then newly independent Australia no longer being at war with Germany. The backdated 1942 declaration ...


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