73

There is a 1946 book by John Hersey, Hiroshima, which is an excellent compilation of personal testimonies from Hiroshima residents following the atomic bombing. Although it doesn’t mention Allied leafleting specifically, there’s a few important things it indicates about civilian perceptions of the threat at the time, namely It was abundantly clear to ...


60

Short answer: No. The only film footage of the RMS Titanic shows her being towed into the outfitting wharf at Belfast in February 1912, and moored at Belfast. A clip of Lusitania leaving port has often been shown as a substitute for Titanic's maiden voyage commencement (including in the 1958 film 'A Night to Remember*). No footage of Titanic leaving ...


29

When Europeans discovered Americas they also imported plagues. These plagues were one factor of the collapse of the pre-columbian cultures. http://www.examiner.com/article/apocalypic-mysterious-plague-killed-millions-of-native-americans-the-1500s : The deaths of somewhere between 40 and 100 million people during a relatively short span of time was not ...


17

It doesn't seem that either city knew with certainty that it was going to be subject to attack (nuclear or otherwise) on those specific days. Japan in general was experiencing relentless bombing. There were at least some evacuations in both cities, but these were not necessarily the result of the leaflets per se. About Hiroshima, a Wikipedia page (the ...


16

I believe this is somewhat overstating the risks and well as the severity of the disasters. A sengokubune (千石船) refers to a ship that can carry 1000 koku of rice (sen = 1000). The actual ship design being referred to is known as a benzaisen (弁才船), originally a type of small cargo boat developed in, and for use within, the Seto Inland Sea. In their calm, ...


14

There was Margaret, Maid of Norway who was the heir to the throne of Scotland. Actually she was the Queen but had not been crowned. She was travelling from Norway to Scotland but after the ship was blown off course to the Orkney Islands she died due to the effects of sea-sickness (so not normally what you think of as a maritime disaster, but it was directly ...


10

Where were they? In lots of places, according to both scientific / archaeological and written evidence, but you are right in saying that Wikipedia gives the impression that wildfires and forest fires didn't happen for much of human history (see, for example, List of wildfires - nothing pre-19th century). This impression is entirely false, but wildfires ...


10

Not of the ship sinking but there is one of the suspected iceberg it hit. The photo was taken from a ship sailing in the area some time later. As it passed by an iceberg someone noticed there were paint stains near the waterline. It was the only iceberg in the vicinity of the wreck Also a salvage vessel took some shots of a lifeboat picked up with a ...


10

In this first paragraph I will discuss what occurred at Hiroshima, in the second paragraph I will discuss what occurred at Nagasaki. At Hiroshima, relief efforts began immediately after the bombing in an unorganized manner, but by the next day they had become organized. A joint public-private meeting was held at 10 AM, the day after the bombing where it was ...


8

As a former naval officer (US) I'll say that in my opinion the Titanic sinking was 100% avoidable. The immediate cause of Titanic's loss was the collision with the iceberg, but the cause of the collision was the callous and negligent disregard by her commanding officer of the dangers involved in transiting an iceberg hazard area at high speed. Getting to her ...


8

Another remark beside the problems of climbing an iceberg: A quote from Wikipedia: Hit an iceberg 11:40 p.m. (ship's time) 14 April 1912 on her maiden voyage and sank 2 h 40 min later After 1 hour the grade of the ship was 5°, an hour later the grade didn't change a lot (from in German Wikipedia). There was no obvious reason of a danger in the begin of ...


8

Yes, the origin of the phrase "Oh, the humanity" was introduced into popular culture by WLS Chicago announcer Herbert Morrison as he was describing the Hindenburg disaster while watching it unfold. From Wiki: Morrison's description has been dubbed onto the newsreel film of the crash, giving the impression of a modern television-style broadcast. ...


7

All of the activities of the airship were considered interesting by the newspapers. The New York Times had 5 or 6 articles on the Hindenburg in April alone. The Hindenburg was by far the fastest way for a passenger to cross the Atlantic at the time, taking only about 70 hours (3 days) compared to regular ships which took about a week, twice as long. It's ...


6

There would have been problems with people from the Titanic trying to climb on to the iceberg that resulting in the ship sinking. To begin with, ice is slippery and from the picture you linked to, the iceberg looked like it had steep sides. Getting onto a steep sided slippery iceberg would be very difficult to do. Staying on the cold, wet, slippery sides ...


6

Mark Kozak-Holland argues that it was quite avoidable. Although popular history has it that the ship was designed to remain afloat with 4 compartments flooded (hat tip to @GWLlosa), the truth is somewhat more discouraging - cost cutting measures by the company during construction actually transformed those resiliency features into one of the causes for the ...


5

Apart from the example of Margaret, Maid of Norway cited in Mark's answer, there seems to be only one other possible heir: John William Friso, Prince of Orange. John William Friso, according to the Wiki article on the The Second Stadtholderless Period, was made William III's heir in 1702 according to his last will and testament: As William died without (...


4

Katrina had a huge electoral impact. It wasn't the death so much as it was the evacuation. For a while in the immediate wake of the storm the city was simply not safe to live in. However, a significant amount of its population had no access to personal transport, so they had to be bussed out to nearby metropoli large enough to absorb them, most notably ...


4

According to Wikipedia, there are several places named Petropavlovsk in the huge country of Russia. No surprise. Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky is in Kamchatka and should be the correct Petropavlovsk. I note that according to Google maps there is a body of water southwest of Petropavlovsk named Vilyuchinskaya Bukhta. That means Vilyuchinskaya Bay. It would ...


3

Besides human writings, wildfires have also been recorded in tree rings and in charcoal records from sediment deposits. For instance, studying sequoias' tree rings, a study from 2009 showed that: A 3,000-year record from 52 sequoia trees show that California's western Sierra Nevada was droughty and often fiery from 800 to 1300. During that period known ...


3

Conference Footage Footage of Legasov's address does exist -- but perhaps not the whole address. The relevant passages in Higginbotham's 'Midnight in Chernobyl' with respect to the Vienna Conference say: Two weeks later, on August 25, Valery Legasov, wearing a gray suit and striped tie, his face puffy and haggard behind thick glasses, took the floor on the ...


3

Wikipedia's History of Firefighting includes the following snippet: The first Roman fire brigade of which we have any substantial history was created by Marcus Licinius Crassus. Marcus Licinius Crassus was born into a wealthy Roman family around the year 115 BC, and acquired an enormous fortune through (in the words of Plutarch) "fire and rapine." One of ...


3

The Avellino eruption may slightly predate the Minoan catastrophe. It caused diverse climatic disturbances in the following years and brought us several archaeological remnants from the beginning of the Bronze Age in Italy.


3

Possibly the Brenva Glacier near Mont Blanc. See the 2010 Master's Thesis by Patrizia Imhof at University of Bern: "Glacier fluctuations in the Italian Mont Blanc massif from the Little Ice Age until the present" See especially section 4.4.4 "First artistic works on the Brenva and beginning advance by the end of the 18th century" (p.65) ...


2

There is never just one factor that causes a civilization to collapse. Usually many civilizations steadily fall in to collapse. It would be helpful if you were to narrow your parameters of the question. The term "civilization" is very broad. Historians trace Western civilization back to the Greek city-states in that began in about 800 B.C.E. However there ...


2

A more general answer can be given. Transatlantic flights of airships were rare events. No comparison with modern airplane fights, and with regular ships crossings at that time. So it is not surprising that they had attention of the media. And they were available mostly to the "rich and famous", and these people always have attention of the media whatever ...


2

There are many things that made the Titanic more vulnerable. During the construction, in the boiler room, a welding torch caused a small fire. this happened to be where the iceberg supposedly struck. The fire may have weakened the steel. Another is that the Titanic's bolts may not have been properly welded which therefore caused a breach as the iceberg hit ...


2

It seems that one basic assumption in the question is stable voting behaviour of affected people. That is likely a quite difficult to test hypothesis. Like in the old paradoxon that if the dumbest person moves from country A to B he might indeed raise the average intelligence of both countries? If people are killed by a catastrophe those all cannot vote ...


2

Since you are interested in records of wild fires from ancient times also , i am herewith providing a brief answer of record of one from India mentioned in epic Mahabharata ,which is considered as Itihasa or history. In sanskrit forest fire/conflagration is called as Davagni or Davanala In the epic Mahabharata there is an account of forest fire at ...


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