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Tin from Britain was used in bronze found in the middle east. And it's likely the Phoenicians were getting copper from across the Atlantic during the same time period. Humans didn't start using iron for everything because it was better than bronze. Civilizations collapsed and the trade networks for bronze alloy materials fell apart so people switched to ...


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No. The concept that informs this "Aryan pricing" ideology the book seller orients himself on is based on the antisemitic stereotype of 'unfair pricing done by Jews', then (and now, don't search the net for the word) called: "Judenpreise" (hereafter JP). The context for the precise quote that informed this question seems to be an American citizen, not a ...


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The practical reason for .95 or .99 pricing isn't psychological manipulation of the customers at all. That might work on some people, but not many. It actually came into use to combat thefts by retail staff, in the days where most payments were in cash. If the Nazis abolished it, the effects of "Aryan pricing" would have been to make theft and corruption ...


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A quick search for the term: Gebrochener Preis (Psychological pricing), including some Bachelor papers, does not mention pre-war usage in Germany at all. One would have to go through newspaper archives to see how prices were displayed at the time. The author of your quote seems to have produced quite a lot of articles in the few years. Since he quotes ...


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The question could use some clarity, but is not unreasonable. In fact, a book was written pretty much on this subject. The Wages of Destruction. Haven't read it, plan to. As a 50-ish French guy, no, it wasn't uncommon to hear older French people say something like "well, he was batshit evil but did fix their unemployment". By people who were not in ...


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Yes, if they wanted to be great power If we search for a few words to describe Germany in interwar period, those would be poor industrial country. Enormous cost of WW1, reparations, abolition of Gold mark (with associated devaluation of Papiermark and infamous inflation), loss of colonies etc ... left Germany in pretty bad economic shape. What Germany still ...


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Short answer: Yes, war against Bolshevism was considered unavoidable for the survival of the nation. The August 1936 Momorandum sets out the reasons why Hitler believed this and his instructions on how it is to be delt with. Our political situation results from the following: Europe has at present only two States which can be regarded as ...


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Many point to improvements in Germany's economy that took place under Hitler prior to WW2. That's debatable. Some improvements were made, but generally speaking he overspend massively based on a complete lack of economic knowledge. That overspending doesn't have to become a problem, and can revive a bad economy. But you HAVE to pay it back. His programs ...


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Marco Polo was, famously, amazed when he first encountered paper currency during his travels. In this respect he started a long tradition -- why would anyone accept this rather than something tangible like metal. The Khans, it should be noted in passing, solved that problem by sentencing those who refused it to death. Modern states solve the same problem by ...


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