New answers tagged

0

The West German citizen must plot an exact but wandering course of left and right deviations or fall off a precipice. West Germany while nominally a democracy had extreme restrictions on left wing political organisation combined with a failed de-Nazification that barely acknowledged mass killing of non-combatants in Europe in the 1940s. Moreover, West ...


4

This a caricature (05:30) bei Vicco von Bülow, pen name Loriot. The title says "Bundesbürger 1960", and means 'West-German citizen 1960'. This man makes a Gratwanderung blindfolded. Gratwanderung being an idiom, meaning not only alpine hiking, but also being in a precarious situation, in which no deviations are 'advisable', if not incredibly dangerous. But ...


0

Because that is where the iron ore was and still is (Pilsen marked by the red flag): as well as convenient access to coal for coking As is readily seen Pilsen is on the edge of several major iron ore deposits, in total far larger than anything else in the Austrian (later Austro-Hungarian) Empire, with convenient access to coal fields in the Sudeten as well ...


2

Robert B. Marks in his The Origins of the Modern World: a Global and Environmental Narrative from the Fifteenth to the Twenty-First Century He describes how England started to import cotton cloth (callicoe) from India in the second half of 17 century until they by 1700 was dependent on them. 130 years later India (due to the navigation laws) imported cheap ...


-2

I think it is also necessary to recognize that the southern states 1860 basically was in the same situation as the small states (and not so small states in Latin America) or the states in Africa after the great depression 1930: dependency on cotton, sugar and rice as cash crops but which is heavily exposed to changes in international commerce. the Northern ...


1

From the Wikipedia on the Supermarine Spitfire: "On 3 June 1936, the Air Ministry placed an order for 310 aircraft, at a cost of £1,395,000.... In mid-1938, the first production Spitfire rolled off the assembly line and was flown by Jeffrey Quill on 15 May 1938, almost 24 months after the initial order. The final cost of the first 310 aircraft, ...


5

Question: Why are the historical large cities in the southern US not the large cities in the South today? Antebellum South: Charleston, Richmond, Savannah, and New Orleans Post-bellum South: Atlanta, Charlotte, Miami, and Houston Short Answer: What really changed in the post-bellum south was ...


15

The question is still a little bit fuzzy, but I think its due to not understanding what drove trade in the pre-industrial era, so I'm just going to get into that. The basic consideration here is transport. Prior to the invention of the railroad, shipping over water was vastly more efficient than doing it any other way. So back then it was almost more ...


3

There is ample evidence for the positive answer to your question 1. This phenomenon is well-known and is often mentioned. On question 2, my answer is "it is not completely clear". And on question 3, I think it has not been investigated in full generality. As an example, let me cite the first few lines of the preface to the book by Janos Horwath, Panorama of ...


1

You are probably thinking of the "Martians from Hungary" — a group of prominent and very successful scientists, mostly physicists and mathematicians who emigrated to the United States in the early half of the 20th century. Quite some of them attended even the same school in Budapest. There are several theories about the cause, but one of the most ...


Top 50 recent answers are included