45

Ironically, it seems to coincide with the addition of the very word 'ampersand' to the dictionaries. But the process took a while to complete and a precise date seems to be undeterminable, not in the least because it wasn't universally adopted ever. The character got its corrupted name around 1837 and from then on lost popularity so much that by the late ...


24

This goes back to Frederick Barbarossa. He granted the university the so called scholar's privilege the privilegium scholasticum or authentica habita in 1150s. Full universities had to be granted papal or princely privileges to be founded but from 1150s on they had judicial autonomy. It was the result of active and collective defiance of students and ...


10

Among the best primary sources for this are Institutio Oratoria by Quintilian (c.35 to c.100 BC) and Dialogus de oratoribus, usually attributed to Tacitus (c.56 to c.100). Both of these are cited extensively by Stanley Bonner in Education in Ancient Rome: From the Elder Cato to the Younger Pliny. It should be noted, though, that the liberal education ...


8

I'm going to address your question in two parts: 1. The accuracy of the claim that attendance dropped. 2. The effect that the lectures had on the attendees. Firstly, as you rightly hypothesised, the tale of dropping attendance was false. This stemmed from a preface to the book, written by David Goodstein and Gerry Neugebauer. They wrote that "… as the ...


7

Why do universities prefer to have their own police force? I can address this a little bit in the United States context. As you noted, the rise of campus police forces came after campus protests in the 1960s. Many state legislatures passed laws that instructed college administrators to address "disorder," such as this one in New York state from 1969: ...


6

The short answer is: where there was even a small Muslim population, there were usually schools for children at the elementary level, even in villages. Overall, we are thus talking about numbers which dwarf the number of Christian missions. Without a basic religious education, Muslims cannot perform the duties required of them. Some of these schools were ...


6

One of the first students to be sent away for education may have been the son of José de la Guerra y Noriega, Juan José Noriega, who was sent to Liverpool, England for education in 1825. When he returned to California in c.1831 at the age of about 21 he was tutored in higher mathematics by Father Patrick Short who in 1834 jointly with William Hartnell, who ...


5

As you said, by the 17th century many people were literate and had a copy of the Bible. The following figure shows the literacy rate throughout the last 500 years in several countries: An interesting point for me is the sharp increase in the UK and Netherlands, both Protestant countries, compared to Italy and France which remained Catholic (Italy in ...


5

The keyword to search for is Schulungslager, this is what Nazi "re-education camps" were called. These camps were used for indoctrination not only of teachers but also other professionals. Here is an excerpt (discussing such camps) from the PhD dissertation Forestopia: The Use of the Forest Landscape in Naturalizing National Socialist Ideologies of Volk, ...


4

Wikipedia's article on Jewish deicide makes clear that the Catholic Church had downplayed Jewish responsibility for the death of Jesus at the Council of Trent, centuries before. As you suggest, at Vatican II the concept was explicitly rejected. Of course, these edicts are not necessarily what is taught or learned in local schools. Your story is sadly ...


4

The Wikipedia article Myth of the flat Earth gives a general summary for the Western world as: According to Stephen Jay Gould, "there never was a period of 'flat Earth darkness' among scholars (regardless of how the public at large may have conceptualized our planet both then and now). ... Historian Jeffrey Burton Russell says the flat-Earth error ...


3

To focus on a single type of schoolbook, we can look at the McGuffey Readers. If we look at the wiki page discussing these, we find an explanation of the progression through this series of books. (emphasis mine) Most schools of the 19th century used only the first two in the series of McGuffey's four readers. The first Reader taught reading by using ...


3

This is my idea how this happen. Japan during the Meiji Era started the modernization of Japan and started copying everything western. I believe even the sailor suit used by school children was copied from Britain. As for the bell chime, it seems it was started only near 1950s. According to this site (In Japanese), after WW2 around the 1950s, the school ...


2

I have a story idea about a schoolchild who, among other unusual atributes, skips grades, and I just found this: http://theconversation.com/should-i-grade-skip-my-gifted-child-663591 Claiming that about 1 percent of school students in the USA skip grades, giving as its source: http://www.accelerationinstitute.org/research/...


2

When I was young (in 1960-80) there was a notion of "(industrially) developed country" and "developing country" (a. k. a. the 3-d world). Japan was the only country in the whole Asia which qualified as "developed". Perhaps this division is out of date. But when you count the number of Nobel prizes you surely count from the beginning, and they are awarded ...


1

Was Deicide officially taught in American Catholic (“parochial”) schools and if so, when did it officially end? Short Answer: This isn't a Catholic thing it's a Christian thing and historically and in modern times is more associated with scapegoating, superstition, and prejudice than it is with main stream Christian beliefs. No it has never ...


1

No, deicide was not taught in any Catholic schools in the 20th century, except possibly heretical or mistaken ones. The reason is simple--deicide is not possible in Catholic doctrine, since God cannot die. This has been Catholic (and Greek Orthodox and, following them both, mainline Protestant) teaching at least since the Council of Chalcedon in 451, which ...


1

You can't find much info about grants as scholarships from the government are a fairly recent development. In the 18th and 19th century rich individuals gave grants. The terms of each grant varied very much. Your teenager is probably a child of the lower or (lower) middle class. Most likely the middle class. It wasn't impossible for lower class children, ...


1

The letter present on the dress is in fact the "TAU - greek letter", but it's the lowercase version. The letter on the first step of the staircase (counting from above) is the "PI - greek letter" but it's a different lowercase version called the "POMEGA". SIDE NOTE: If you search on the 13 page of 617 on the link below, you will find the hebrew and greek ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible