Episode #125 of the Stack Overflow podcast is here. We talk Tilde Club and mechanical keyboards. Listen now
85

You could call it a 'large scale protest' that following the Presidential election held on 6 November 1860, I assume once the votes were counted and reported by telegraph it was known by 7 or 8 November that Abraham Lincoln had won, the state legislature of South Carolina voted on 9 November to declare Lincoln's election a hostile act and its intention to ...


34

This is because the USA uses the first-past-the-post principle in all its elections rather than proportional representation like Russia uses. The effect of first-past-the-post is that only a party with a good chance of winning the most votes can ever have a shot at any representation whatsoever. Since there mathematically can be no more than two such ...


33

It actually happens fairly often. The last was in 2004, where a Minnesota elector (who would not own up to it) voted for Edwards (the VP candidate) instead of John Kerry. The assumption has been that this was done out of incompetence rather than malice. The cycle before that, the DC elector refused to vote, in protest to DC having no congressional ...


31

Unless a particular Air Force General 'fesses up in an autobiography, the first question is unanswerable. On the second question, absolutely that was happening. It had been happening for years, escalating in quantity and variety of supplies transported, since at least 1959. The supply trail was known as the Ho Chi Minh Trail, ran through the mountains of ...


25

I don't recall hearing about protests after Obama's election, or inauguration. George W Bush's election took until December 12th to become definite because of the lawsuits over the Florida voting and recounts. There were protests over that at his inauguration. You can find some more documentation easily with Google: here's an example search.


23

The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland was created in 1801, by the merger of the Kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland under the Acts of Union. The previous Parliament (the last Parliament of Great Britain) had held its last general election in 1796, so that Parliament became the first UK Parliament on 22 January 1801. So, the first General ...


19

From a comment by Sassa NF: In real life I asked my parents why they would still go and vote - I asked this after USSR collapsed. The answer was exactly what I said - "are you mad? It would instantly be known and there would be consequences" I became curious and asked my mother. She was born in early 1950s, so her reply covers the years 1969 to 1986. (...


17

Yes. Absolutism is rarely, if ever, as absolute as the name suggests. Even after the ascension of Louis XIV, the Estates of France continued to meet in assemblies. The most famous and powerful was of course the Estates General, a national body which admittedly only met once in this period. And it ended up ushering in the French Revolution. However, on the ...


15

Depending on exactly what you mean by a "serious effort" the answer would seem to be no. I am assuming that you would consider a proposed constitutional amendment that got to the states and did not receive enough votes in the states as serious. There have however been numerous efforts to reform or abolish the electoral college. According to archives.gov ...


15

As per the decree law of 16 November 1940, elections were only allowed for the "smallest communes". This law was published in the Journal Officiel 12 December 12, 1940 and ...provided for the abolition of elected councils in communes and municipalities of 2,000 population and over....It is now provided that the members of councils in towns with a ...


14

As per your original question: The Wikipedia section does not claim that Joseph P Kennedy bought John F Kennedy's victory. Such claims would be rather outlandish as it would mean that he was the only or the major contributor to the primary election campaign. As JFK would not have been able to win the democratic primary election unless he had widespread ...


13

There is an effort underway now called the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact. These reform efforts wax and wane as demographics meet the various political parties interests. Right now, "progressives" are really excited about the popular vote, because they can successfully get key voting blocks to vote their way with mass media. In earlier times, ...


13

The currently accepted answer is a good one*. However, it leaves out one very important beef that the Republican Establishment had with Reagan: racial politics. The Liberal wing of the Republican party was actually instrumental during the 50's and 60's in getting Civil Rights legislation passed. There was essentially a coalition of moderate Democrats and ...


12

In that time (the quote comes from 1872), brown-bread was just recently introduced as having any benefits for health. Edward Smith started to promote brown-bread in his book "Practical dietary for families, schools, and the laboring classes", released in 1865 in London. Earlier it was treated as worse (because of ingredients) and commonly used as a meal for ...


12

First of all, I don't really buy the premise that elections were often limited to city states mainly because of logistical problems. I would rather argue that it was because the polis was the primary societal identification for most freemen in the Mediterranean lands, and therefore it was natural for the people of each city-state to want to govern their own ...


12

When you are talking about participation and the numbers of votes for the candidate, you should take into account that these numbers were mostly fake. Nobody really counted. Another thing which is difficult to understand to the Westerners is the permanent feeling of fear. People knew that there was a record, who voted and who did not. They also believed that ...


12

Even in USA your participation in elections is recorded: as you come to the booth, your name is marked in the logs. It was most certainly recorded in USSR, and, because of the "propiska" (the mandatory registration of your address with the local government), the officials knew exactly where to find those who showed their disloyalty to the government by ...


11

Reagan's weakness was that he was not a member of the "Eastern Establishment." Ford was, as well as the incumbent President. That fact led many "established" Republicans to support him "automatically". Reagan needed a "breakthrough". He came close in New Hampshire, with something like 49.5% of the two-candidate vote. Topping Ford there would have been huge. ...


11

Presumably this would be ancient Rome during the early Empire. The best numbers available come, I think, from Augustus' official autobiography. The English text can be found here. In paragraph 8 he says that in the Empire-wide census of 14CE "were counted 4,937,000 of the heads of Roman citizens". Now, it seems to be a vexing questions for historians what ...


11

My understanding, as confirmed by your intuition and this article in the New Yorker exploration into presidential biographies starting with John Eaton's 1817 work "Life of Jackson" was that it wasn't until 1824 that attitudes on running a presidential campaign substantially changed. From said article, The election of 1824 brought the first campaign ...


11

This happened around 1800, when the USA was growing. The first state to have no property requirements for voting was Vermont, when it joined the union in 1791. So it was not really a matter of "abolishing" those restrictions as of not introducing them in the first place - most new states follwed suit. I think the first state to abolish existing property ...


10

In any election that is described as "unanimous", the winner achieved 100% of the vote. George Washington was unanimously elected twice (by the electoral college), and remains the only US president to have achieved this. In 2002, Saddam Hussein claimed to have achieved all 11 million votes in a single-candidate presidential election. Other examples can be ...


10

Federal Election Results According to The American Presidency Project, the 2010 midterm election holds 2nd place in having flipped the most U.S. House and U.S. Senate seats. By position, the top five midterm elections which have resulted in the most U.S. Congress (House and Senate) seats lost / flipped are as follows: 1938 (Franklin D. Roosevelt), House ...


9

If your question is specifically about the candidate hitting the campaign trail and personally campaigning then the answer is the election of 1880. According to the Miller Center at the University of Virginia during the election of 1828 "neither candidate personally campaigned in 1828, but their political followers organized rallies, parades, and ...


9

Presumably he is referring to the Burr conspiracy: The Burr conspiracy in the beginning of the 19th century was a suspected treasonous cabal of planters, politicians, and army officers allegedly led by former U.S. Vice President Aaron Burr. According to the accusations against him, Burr’s goal was to create an independent nation in the center of ...


8

Most states choose Presidential electors based on the candidate who got the most votes in the November election, but not all do. In particular, Nebraska (which has 3 congressional districts and therefore 5 electoral votes) allocates 2 electors to the state-wide winner, and each of the other 3 to the winner in each congressional district. In the 2008 ...


8

Male citizens over the age of 25 were eligible to vote, except for members of the Imperial Army or Navy and the Imperial family. Originally, suffrage was limited to only those who had paid 15 yen in taxes. This initially meant that rural landowners dominated the franchise. However, the tax restriction was reduced to 10 yen and then 3 yen, and eventually ...


8

Until the seventeenth century there were frequent alterations, but almost all for new places to be enfranchised, which I suspect isn't the sort of change you're thinking of. If you go back long enough, the counties were relatively stable, but the number of towns varied - for example, 88 in 1394, 81 in 1399, and 87 in 1421. By 1509, there were 98 boroughs, ...


8

Wikipedia suggest the yearly trail capacity in 1968 was between 10000 (1964) tons, 81000 (1968 reserved offensive supplies) tons and 40000 (end 1970) tons. It usefully doesn’t specify which ton. The first and last estimate appear to be for the overland route controlled by the 559th. Nixon’s statement regarding the logistic capacity of the PLAF/PAVN appears ...


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