Hot answers tagged

10

Cromwell was a Puritan, and Puritan were scriptural literal-ists. They found no scriptural justification for the celebration of Christmas. They associated it with paganism, and residual Papist idolatry. To be fair Christmas traditions in seventeenth century Britain were pretty boisterous.. The Puritans believed in plain dress, no singing (outside of ...


10

The hand gesture showing the middle fingers together has been variously described as a ‘W’ or ‘pseudo-zygodactylous gesture’ or the ‘El Greco gesture’. It seems to have originated in late renaissance or Mannerism period from 1520 to the late 17th century, and was subsequently adopted by many artists in later periods. El Greco was not the first to use this ...


10

Many, including William II, Henry I, Stephen, Henry II, John, Henry IV, Edward IV, Richard III, Henry VII, William III, Mary II, Anne, George I (i.e., were not next heir of previous monarch by primogeniture). Richard III is squishy. It depends whether Edward V and his brother were already dead. Note that I was explicit about how I interpreted "line of ...


9

Ell In England, the ell was usually 45 in (1.143 m), or a yard and a quarter. It was mainly used in the tailoring business but is now obsolete. Although the exact length was never defined in English law, standards were kept; the brass ell examined at the Exchequer by Graham in the 1740s had been in use "since the time of Queen Elizabeth". Selvedge A ...


6

Robert Bartlett, professor of Medieval History at the University of St Andrews, has written that the success of Henry II's short cross type coinage issued in 1180 was so great that no one was willing even to tamper with its inscription, so that English pennies bore the legend 'King Henry' throughout the reigns of Richard I and John. Source: Robert ...


6

This is what the War of the Roses was about. The Houses of Lancaster and York fought each other until the Lancaster branch went extinct. For a moment it seemed like things may have ended there -- which is to say, England moving on, with an usurper on the throne. But the House of Tudor inherited the Lancastrian claim, and its supporters ultimately prevailed.


4

Are you asking if there were any usurpers in English history, when someone overthrows and replaces the ruling king? Or a person who is not the rightful heir of the king according to normal inheritance customs becoming king when the old king dies. Both have happened in English history. An example of the second is when King Richard I died in 1199. His ...


2

Lady Jane Grey (possibly reluctantly) attempted to upset the line of succession stipulated by Henry VIII being the Nine Days' Queen from 10 July until 19 July 1553 After the death of Edward VI (age 15), his sister Mary Tutor, based on the Third Succession Act of July 1543, was the intended successor. For political/religious reasons having a non ...


2

Haha well, Rex is Lex! The king (or mayhap queen) sold you monopolies. If they then sold an overlapping monopoly to someone else, you couldn't do a thing about it. It was also known for the sovereign to sell a monopoly and then sell exemptions from same. You can read about it in the the King's Peace. It was not possible to challenge the sovereign's ...


2

This has happened more than once. One of the earliest incidences was King Stephen. When his predecessor Henry I's heir died, he settled on his daughter Matilda as heir. At the time of his death, Matilda could be seen by that right as being "first in line of succession". But with the inherent misogyny of the time, England was not ready for a queen regnant,...


2

Since the background of the Robin Hood legend is, in most cases, based on the events surrounding the Third Crusade (1189–1192), the intoduction of the Saracen (as Muslims were called then) character Nasir in the Robin of Sherwood series is very straightforward and plausible: he was taken, as a prisoner, back to England So it would seem that the British ...


1

I don't know why Richard or John wouldn't get around to changing the name on the coins, especially if they did change the dates on the coins. And if they didn't change the dates on the coins, how do coin experts know there are coins from the reigns of Richard and John with the name of Henry? One sort of analogous situation is the continued minting of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible