22

No. On the one side, we have Hamilton denouncing Cromwell in the Federalist Papers No. 21: Without a guaranty the assistance to be derived from the Union in repelling those domestic dangers which may sometimes threaten the existence of the State constitutions, must be renounced. Usurpation may rear its crest in each State, and trample upon the ...


14

THE SHORT ANSWER Charles I did borrow money from abroad but it was never enough to meet his needs. The financial drain of the Thirty Years War on much of Europe, a muddled foreign policy, and a lack of both collateral and trust were the main reasons Charles I could not borrow enough abroad. Potential lenders were also reluctant to help the king due to the ...


8

First, what is an official attitude, and did one exist in Williamite England? In modern times, governments try to influence public opinion by the use of spokesmen in democracies, and propaganda in dictatorships. They have a 'line' on this or that issue which they repeat, hoping to make it catch on. I suppose this is what you'd call an official attitude. ...


7

This is a question I've never heard asked about the English Civil War (+1 for thoughtfulness and creativity!), but perhaps for the reason that it's not relevant to the conflict. The overwhelming present-day historical consensus holds that the tensions and causes of eventual warfare between Charles I, Parliament, and the realms over which they ruled were ...


7

I think this is seriously overstating the effects of Parliament's declaration. King Charles set out from Nottingham with something like five foot regiments on 13 September. It's possible his ranks were suddenly swelled within the space of one week because of Parliament. Given the relatively low speed of transport and communications at the time however, it ...


7

(Hint; I may be of Irish ancestry). (Hint 2: I'm trying to go over the top for humorous value; I mean no offense to anyone but Cromwell and Napoleon, and I'm relatively sure they won't take offense). If you're Irish, then the official view is to recognize that Cromwell was a murdering bastard who only fell short of genocide because he was lazy. Later, ...


7

On 20 October 1645, Parliament resolved that the Committee of Both Kingdoms should consider which castles and fortifications were to be slighted. Through 1646 and beyond, Parliament passed a series of resolutions to slight castles. I'm not sure that a central list exists but you can probably compile one easily if you search for "slighted" in the Journal of ...


6

Because there was no need to. During the English Civil War, the old Wardour Castle was besieged and largely blown up by the 3rd Baron Arundell. This is not readily apparent from the Wikipedia article, which depicts this photo: (Photo by Simon Burchell CC BY_SA 3.0) Well, that seems formidable enough. However - if you walk around the castle, you'll see this:...


5

I can't offer a good answer, so I'll offer a bad one. * One of the impacts of the English Civil war was the creation of Whig philosophy - the notion that although England would remain a Monarchy, supreme power lay in the hands of Parliament. (Obvious oversimplification here; it might be more accurate to ascribe this to the Glorious Revolution, but to my ...


5

The Roundheads had various names but in general did recognise it as a civil war, more precisely, "civil warre" or "seven yeares’ warre". On Civil War, in a letter from General George Monck to Major-General John Lambert: I desire your Lordshippe to consider seriously the sad consequences of a civill warre, least you involve your self too farre in itt, ...


4

It's one thing to execute your king for making war on Parliament. The ensuing execution - by beheading for a peer or hanging for a commoner - had the saving grace of being a routine public affair for the time, one that regularly attracted crowds out for a day's entertainment. Even women and children were known to enjoy the spectacle. It is another thing ...


4

The historian David Sharp and issu.com call this 6 Sept declaration a 'miscalculation' by John Pym who was the leader of the Long Parliament. Charles I didn't have much support at the time so Parliament thought that the war would be over quickly. But instead of making people who were sympathetic to the king support parliament (because maybe Parliament ...


4

If we are talking about poetry: Milton’s Sonnet 16 (Cromwell, our chief of men...), written in 1652, was first published in Edward Phillips’s “Life of Milton” in 1694, during the reign of William and Mary. It does not seem that there was any official attempt to suppress it.


3

The "official" position during the reigns of William and Mary, Anne and George I can be seen in the national holy days, with special religious services and forms of prayer, which were ordered by them to be observed annually during their reigns. Special services were held in every parish church in England and Wales. These were A form of Prayer and Fasting ...


3

You might consult Challis, C. E., ed. 1992. A New History of the Royal Mint.; or, Craig, J. 1953. The Mint: A History of the London Mint from A.D. 287 to 1948. The Quarterly Journal of Economics (available from the unciteable Google Books) cites the following primary sources: Burnet's History of my own time and Rushworth's Historical Collections and ...


2

That blog post is presenting the argument of Albion's Seed. However, he's presenting it in a somewhat twisted way. It looks like he's trying to make political points as much as he is historical ones, and that's causing him to both simplify and outright misrepresent some of his history. For that reason, I'd suggest reading the original book, if you are ...


2

Dr Lila Rakoczy wrote a thesis on the topic. You can read it for free: http://etheses.whiterose.ac.uk/11092/ I think the number of castles slighted was over 100 (can't remember exactly).


2

Parliament was already walking on legal thin ice Biggest legal dilemma facing Rump Parliament in the trial of Charles I was the question do they actually have the authority to judge him. Defense of Charles was actually exactly that, he had divine rights of king, he was set up to rule England by the will of God, and no earthly power could take this right ...


1

If it pleases your honour, allow me to address the Court of HSE: The Learned Samuel Russell is of the opinion: "Charles I was aware of this." I submit, this is immaterial to the matter at hand, simply, it was not up to the late Charles I to decide on his own punishment. On the contrary, I do submit, it does matter if the newly constituted "High Court of ...


1

Question: Did the 'founding fathers' of the United States see Oliver Cromwell as a role model? Oliver Cromwell died 1658, more than a century before the Declaration of Independence. Cromwell was religious fanatic, a regicidal dictator who waged religious genocide. He was the founding fathers worst nightmare, their model of what not to do. Can you ...


1

Extemely short and simple answer: No, because for one thing, Cromwell eventually set himself up as dictator, the "Lord-Protector", which was simply a title for the person in charge. He first created a non-elected "representative" system before that, where the people in that system were simply nominated but not elected. In other words, he was very much like ...


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