94

They were called paper darts in the 19th century, as evidenced in this article, which contains many detailed references going back as far as 1864, and many illustrations In fact, it appears that they continued to be called "paper darts" until the mid-20th century, when the terminology switched largely because airplanes had come to more closely ...


78

Short Answer (Paper) Dart and (Paper) Arrow These terms were used from at least the 1860s. However, not all of these designs were what we would today recognize and call 'paper planes'. Some clearly looked like the darts thrown at dart boards. Details There are 19th century references (with images resembling paper planes) to 'paper dart' and 'arrow' (UK &...


51

At least regarding when, we can see with Google Books Ngrams. First let's look at "atomic energy" vs. "nuclear energy": In the 1940s, both terms were in use, but "atomic energy" was the far more common one, by about factor of 10 in the late 1940s and by a factor of 4 in the late 1950s. But the popularity of "atomic energy&...


20

The oldest universities in today's English-speaking world are Oxford and Cambridge, having mottoes Dominus illuminatio mea, "The Lord is my light", and Hinc lucem et pocula sacra, "From here, light and sacred draughts". These mottoes, as LangLangC pointed out, are not as old as the universities themselves. Mottoes often accompany coats of arms, which the ...


19

Professor David Crystal has written a whole book on this, but it is possible to provide a reasonable answer without going to great lengths. First, though, it would help to define what a global language is. Why, for example, is English widely considered to be the global language when there are far more native speakers of Mandarin? Crystal, in English as a ...


17

The Holland Lop is a popular species of lop-eared rabbit. The accusation of being a "lop-eared Dutch" is of cowardice, an expectation that the accused will "run like a rabbit" from battle; and perhaps an allusion to First Manassas. The "Dutch" portion of the phrase would reference not only the (Amish and Mennonite) German ...


8

Do you know what the difference is between an endonym and an exonym? An exonym or xenonym is an external name for a geographical place, a group of people, an individual person, or a language or dialect1. It is a common name used only outside the place, group, or linguistic community in question. An endonym or autonym is an internal name for a geographical ...


7

The Holland lop rabbit breed is from 1952 and was only introduced to America at the end of the 1970s. That's what it says on the Wikipedia page for that breed already. Rabbits are also certainly not the only species known for having droopy ears. These are found for example in pigs, horses and asses. That is just a quite common sign in many domesticated ...


7

John Pickering's A vocabulary, or collection of words and phrases which have been supposed to be peculiar to the United States of America of 1816, does not use the phrase "American English"; but he refers (p.10) to "a language, that is to be called at some future day the American tongue!". This latter is contained in "An Essay on the ...


6

It has been claimed that the parish of an Englishman's birth can be identified from hearing him speak a few sentences. Likewise in Modern America the accents and usages of Boston, New York, Charlottesville, Chicago, Dallas, and Los Angeles are today, and always have been, very different. Despite these disparities, there is no such animal as "American ...


6

Following the citation in Wikipedia to the book in google books the signature there (page 480) is presented as "Tho." not "Tho:". "Tho." is the standard abbreviation of "Thomas", the first name of writer of the letter, as suggested in the comments by @jamesqf


6

Yes flak was used by pilots and crews in the Japanese theater, specifically Curtis LeMay who said after an incendiary bombing raid, "Large fires observed. Flak moderate. Fighter opposition nil." And if Curtis LeMay was calling it flak it can be assumed pilots under him were doing the same. Additionally because of the war in Europe, pilots were ...


5

While I cannot actually answer your question regarding the pacific theatre in particular, the term "Flak" (Flugzeugabwehrkanone / literally Aircraft-Defense-Cannon) came into being in May 1916, after being officially renamed/redesignated from its former name of "BAK" (Ballonabwehrkanone / literally Balloon-Defense-Cannon). So people could ...


4

Few languages are created by a dictionary writer.* The differences emerging between 'English English' and 'American English' were observable a lot earlier than the very desire for American Independence from Britain came into being, let alone to fruition We therefore need to go further back than the publication of that dictionary. A certain Mr Webster just ...


2

"Paper darts" were the best way to have fun in the 1860s. As early as 1864, kids were flying "paper darts" that looked like what we call "paper airplanes" today.They were called paper darts because they looked and acted like "darts" to a degree of thinking.


1

I have a diary and some papers from this period. My family had a farm near West Plains, Missouri. My ancestor was German of recent immigration married to a Scots-Irish woman. Since he and his immediate family became enriched by this marriage / situation and owned slaves they were confederate sympathizers. The rest of German relatives (Uncles, cousins, ...


1

There are still quite a lot of uses of "atomic" in this kind of context floating around, particular in organisation names. For eaxmple, in the UK, the Atomic Weapons Establishment is responsible for the maintenance of the UK's nuclear weapons arsenal; the International Atomic Energy Agency is a body involved in use of nuclear power - I'm sure there ...


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