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They were called paper darts in the 19th century, as evidenced in this article, which contains many detailed references going back as far as 1864, and many illustrations In fact, it appears that they continued to be called "paper darts" until the mid-20th century, when the terminology switched largely because airplanes had come to more closely ...


78

Short Answer (Paper) Dart and (Paper) Arrow These terms were used from at least the 1860s. However, not all of these designs were what we would today recognize and call 'paper planes'. Some clearly looked like the darts thrown at dart boards. Details There are 19th century references (with images resembling paper planes) to 'paper dart' and 'arrow' (UK &...


10

A count in the 9th century? Well, then we are speaking not just about a very rich person, we are speaking about a head of his own state. He is not subject to any other state authority except loose alliances. Possibly he respects the authority of the Pope and/or Charlemagne, but that's it. He also can be opposed to both. He definitely would not go to theatre ...


8

UK Pre-decimal Currency: there were twenty shillings (s) to a pound and twelve pence (d) to a shilling. If written '7/6, this means 7 shillings and 6 pence. Exchange rate: for most of the war, £1 = $4.03 so 1 shilling was about 20 US cents. Prices varied enormously, depending on the theatre, the cast, and (especially) where you were seated. A box for four or ...


8

So there is actually a difference in Medieval and Renaissance times, between a Jester and a Fool. Jesters were typically known for their witticisms and wordplay - essentially their ability to work clever jests. Fools were typically physically and/or mentally impaired people who provided entertainment because of unintentional behaviour or speech. There was ...


5

The earliest use of Golden Age with reference to musical theatre in general which I've been able to find is in this May 3rd 1977 New York Times review by Clive Barnes of a revival of The King and I with Yul Brynner. The title is of the review is: 'King and I,’ Reminder of Golden Age The review goes on to call The King and I a reminder of what the Broadway ...


3

As i remember, there are jesters & fools in the triumphal procession of Maximilian I, a paper procession printed by the Emperor as dynastic and personal propaganda. The woodcuts have often be reproduced, as in my copy of The Triumph of Maximilian I: 137 woodcuts by Hans Burgkemair and Others, Stanley Applebaum, Dover Press, NY, 1964. On page 6 of the ...


3

No. Gary Sinise has done over 100 USO tours. According to an article at USO.org dated April 18, 2017, Gary Sinise & Lt. Dan Band Performance Marks Actor's 97th USO Tour A later article,just last month(Mar 27, 2019), also at USO, says Today, Sinise will perform his 100th USO Tour in Virginia Beach, Virginia, and we’d like to salute his service ...


2

"Paper darts" were the best way to have fun in the 1860s. As early as 1864, kids were flying "paper darts" that looked like what we call "paper airplanes" today.They were called paper darts because they looked and acted like "darts" to a degree of thinking.


2

Courty is actually Courty, Pascal. 2003. "Some Economics of Ticket Resale ." Journal of Economic Perspectives, 17 (2): 85-97. DOI: 10.1257/089533003765888449 This is not the appropriate journal for a historical “review article” of the state of historiography on the monetary bourgeoisification of culture, including as commodity. Nor is it the ...


2

Hardly definitive, but I just took a search through the Medieval and Early Modern Sources Online database (MEMSO). There are about 150 references to jesters over about 300 years, and no indication of any disability associated with them, whether physical or mental. If anything, the implication is usually of sharp-wittedness and cunning. For instance, James VI ...


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